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The Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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The Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103598

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103468

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel

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Saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) facing an ant carrying a dandelion seed, Sabzevar, IranSaw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) facing an ant carrying a dandelion seed, Sabzevar, IranSaw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) facing an ant carrying a dandelion seed, Sabzevar, Iran© Frank Deschandol & Philippe Sabine / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) facing an ant carrying a

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Honey bee covered with pollen, Provence, FranceHoney bee covered with pollen, Provence, FranceHoney bee covered with pollen, Provence, France© Philippe Giraud / Biosgarden / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bee covered with pollen, Provence, France

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Aztec ants on Cecropia - Barro Colorado Panama ; The Aztec ants live in association with a fast growing tree, the Cecropia. The hollow trunk of Cecropia allows ants to install and it secret at the base of its leaves nectar that feeds them. In return, the ants protect the tree aztec against climbing plants seeking support and herbivores. A fine example of cooperation.Aztec ants on Cecropia - Barro Colorado PanamaAztec ants on Cecropia - Barro Colorado Panama ; The Aztec ants live in association with a fast growing tree, the Cecropia. The hollow trunk of Cecropia allows ants to install and it secret at the base of its leaves nectar that feeds them. In return, the ants protect the tree aztec against climbing plants seeking support and herbivores. A fine example of cooperation.© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Aztec ants on Cecropia - Barro Colorado Panama ; The Aztec ants

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Leaf-cutter ants carrying leaves Bolivia Leaf-cutter ants carrying leaves Bolivia Leaf-cutter ants carrying leaves Bolivia © Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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Leaf-cutter ants carrying leaves Bolivia 

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Ant with captured dragonfly as food, Eurasian Bluet (Coenagrion), Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, EuropeAnt with captured dragonfly as food, Eurasian Bluet (Coenagrion), Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, EuropeAnt with captured dragonfly as food, Eurasian Bluet (Coenagrion), Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, Europe© Thomas Hinsche / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Ant with captured dragonfly as food, Eurasian Bluet (Coenagrion),

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Honey Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) - Arizona. Honey Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) with engorged gasters -Arizona - Lives in undergound colonies that protect them from harsh desert conditions - Specialized members of the colony-called repletes-store liquid food in their engorged gasters which is shared with other members of the colony as neededHoney Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) - Arizona. Honey Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) with engorged gasters -Arizona - Lives in undergound colonies that protect them from harsh desert conditions - Specialized members of the colony-called repletes-store liquid food in their engorged gasters which is shared with other members of the colony as neededHoney Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) - Arizona. Honey Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) with engorged gasters -Arizona - Lives in undergound colonies that protect them from harsh desert conditions - Specialized members of the colony-called repletes-store liquid food in their engorged gasters which is shared with other members of the colony as needed© John Cancalosi / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Spain and Portugal
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Honey Pot Ant (Myrmecocystus spp) - Arizona. Honey Pot Ant

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Nasutitermitinae ; Termites with translucent cuticles ; Termites have very thin cuticles that are often translucent. It's thought to be an adaptation to avoid wasting nitrogen, which is in limited supply for a lot of termite species. ; SingaporeNasutitermitinae ; Termites with translucent cuticles ; Termites have very thin cuticles that are often translucent. It's thought to be an adaptation to avoid wasting nitrogen, which is in limited supply for a lot of termite species. ; SingaporeNasutitermitinae ; Termites with translucent cuticles ; Termites have very thin cuticles that are often translucent. It's thought to be an adaptation to avoid wasting nitrogen, which is in limited supply for a lot of termite species. ; Singapore© Melvyn Yeo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Nasutitermitinae ; Termites with translucent cuticles ; Termites

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Ant (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, SardiniaAnt (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, SardiniaAnt (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Ant (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro,

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Ant (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, SardiniaAnt (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, SardiniaAnt (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Ant (Temnothorax sp) under limestone rock, Province of Nuoro,

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Black ants and cocoons under a stone, SardiniaBlack ants and cocoons under a stone, SardiniaBlack ants and cocoons under a stone, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Black ants and cocoons under a stone, Sardinia

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood,

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood,

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) in dead pine wood,

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, SardiniaSaintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in dead pine wood, Sardinia© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Saintonge Termite (Reticulitermes santonensis) winged imago in

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frame© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees on a hive frame

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Yellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), future queens: winged sexual adult giant compared to non-winged forms, Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, FranceYellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), future queens: winged sexual adult giant compared to non-winged forms, Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, FranceYellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), future queens: winged sexual adult giant compared to non-winged forms, Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, France© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), future queens: winged sexual

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Yellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, FranceYellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, FranceYellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), Bouxières aux dames, Lorraine, France© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow meadow ant (Lasius flavus), Bouxières aux dames,

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Honey bee swarm (Apis mellifera), National Nature Reserve of Plaine des Maures, Vidauban, Var, FranceHoney bee swarm (Apis mellifera), National Nature Reserve of Plaine des Maures, Vidauban, Var, FranceHoney bee swarm (Apis mellifera), National Nature Reserve of Plaine des Maures, Vidauban, Var, France© Michel Cavalier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bee swarm (Apis mellifera), National Nature Reserve of

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Himantoglossum hircinum, pollination by a European bee (Apis mellifera), Bollenberg, Orschwihr, Haut-Rhin, FranceHimantoglossum hircinum, pollination by a European bee (Apis mellifera), Bollenberg, Orschwihr, Haut-Rhin, FranceHimantoglossum hircinum, pollination by a European bee (Apis mellifera), Bollenberg, Orschwihr, Haut-Rhin, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Himantoglossum hircinum, pollination by a European bee (Apis

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Low angle shot of a big ant (Camponotus singularis) major, MalaysiaLow angle shot of a big ant (Camponotus singularis) major, MalaysiaLow angle shot of a big ant (Camponotus singularis) major, Malaysia© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Low angle shot of a big ant (Camponotus singularis) major,

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Minor worker ants protecting the major worker ant (Formicidae - Myrmicinae - Carebara diversa).Minor worker ants protecting the major worker ant (Formicidae - Myrmicinae - Carebara diversa).Minor worker ants protecting the major worker ant (Formicidae - Myrmicinae - Carebara diversa).© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Minor worker ants protecting the major worker ant (Formicidae -

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive,

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive,

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Buff-tailed Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. Nest interior with worker, honey chambers and larvae chambers. Cut off of one larvae chamber to show the inside. Nests are usually underground, in banks or among tree roots. The queen creates a circular chamber in which she builds a wax egg cell, and she lays her first batch of eggs inside. The eggs are laid on a layer of pollen, which is collected by the queen, and then covered with a layer of wax. After hatching, the white larvae are fed on honey and pollen by the queen. When they are fully-grown, the larvae develop into pupae after spinning a protective silk cocoon around themselves. During the pupal stage, the larvae develop into adult workers. Portugal.Buff-tailed Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. Nest interior with worker, honey chambers and larvae chambers. Cut off of one larvae chamber to show the inside. Nests are usually underground, in banks or among tree roots. The queen creates a circular chamber in which she builds a wax egg cell, and she lays her first batch of eggs inside. The eggs are laid on a layer of pollen, which is collected by the queen, and then covered with a layer of wax. After hatching, the white larvae are fed on honey and pollen by the queen. When they are fully-grown, the larvae develop into pupae after spinning a protective silk cocoon around themselves. During the pupal stage, the larvae develop into adult workers. Portugal.Buff-tailed Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. Nest interior with worker, honey chambers and larvae chambers. Cut off of one larvae chamber to show the inside. Nests are usually underground, in banks or among tree roots. The queen creates a circular chamber in which she builds a wax egg cell, and she lays her first batch of eggs inside. The eggs are laid on a layer of pollen, which is collected by the queen, and then covered with a layer of wax. After hatching, the white larvae are fed on honey and pollen by the queen. When they are fully-grown, the larvae develop into pupae after spinning a protective silk cocoon around themselves. During the pupal stage, the larvae develop into adult workers. Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2167876

Buff-tailed Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. Nest interior with

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on a crushed pearHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on a crushed pearHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on a crushed pear© Alexandre Petzold / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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2145872

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on a crushed pear

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The Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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The Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant.

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126411

The Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and

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The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126408

The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The

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The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126407

The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the

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The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126404

The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of

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The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126403

The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of

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The Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126402

The Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126401

The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126400

The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange

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The Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126399

The Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de

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The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126397

The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126395

The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126394

The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The

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The Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126392

The Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange

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Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2121215

Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali,

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Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali, Indonesia.© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2121214

Oecophyllous ants (Oecophylla longinoda) making their nest, Bali,

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Stingless bee (Melipona beecheii) on a comb, Mexico. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeStingless bee (Melipona beecheii) on a comb, Mexico. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeStingless bee (Melipona beecheii) on a comb, Mexico. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105279

Stingless bee (Melipona beecheii) on a comb, Mexico. Mexico

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Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105276

Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii,

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Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105275

Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during

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Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105274

Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during

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Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105273

Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii,

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The brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105272

The brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out

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Two beecheii bees cling to a wax surface. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeTwo beecheii bees cling to a wax surface. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeTwo beecheii bees cling to a wax surface. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105271

Two beecheii bees cling to a wax surface. Mexico stingless

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Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeOf the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii, only leaves a very narrow entrance to its trunk hive to protect itself from attack by predators and rivals. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105268

Of the size of a European bee, the Maya bee, melipona beecheii,

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Unlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeUnlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeUnlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105266

Unlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee

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A trigona scaptotrigona bee on a coffee flower. The breeding of this bee brings the cooperative an undeniable extra in terms of the pollination of the coffee plants and therefore the quality of the coffee beans. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeA trigona scaptotrigona bee on a coffee flower. The breeding of this bee brings the cooperative an undeniable extra in terms of the pollination of the coffee plants and therefore the quality of the coffee beans. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeA trigona scaptotrigona bee on a coffee flower. The breeding of this bee brings the cooperative an undeniable extra in terms of the pollination of the coffee plants and therefore the quality of the coffee beans. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105265

A trigona scaptotrigona bee on a coffee flower. The breeding of

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Belonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeBelonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeBelonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105261

Belonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s

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A trigona scaptotrigona bee takes flight from the wax cone at the entrance to the earthen hive. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeA trigona scaptotrigona bee takes flight from the wax cone at the entrance to the earthen hive. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeA trigona scaptotrigona bee takes flight from the wax cone at the entrance to the earthen hive. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105260

A trigona scaptotrigona bee takes flight from the wax cone at the

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The guard bees watch over the entrance to the hive, a veritable takeoff runway built of wax. The populations of trigona scaptotrigona can mainly be found on the central plateaus of Mexico (Sierra Madre). This bee is kept for its honey and for the pollination of the coffee plants. The trigona scaptotrigona can also be found in Africa and Australia. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe guard bees watch over the entrance to the hive, a veritable takeoff runway built of wax. The populations of trigona scaptotrigona can mainly be found on the central plateaus of Mexico (Sierra Madre). This bee is kept for its honey and for the pollination of the coffee plants. The trigona scaptotrigona can also be found in Africa and Australia. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe guard bees watch over the entrance to the hive, a veritable takeoff runway built of wax. The populations of trigona scaptotrigona can mainly be found on the central plateaus of Mexico (Sierra Madre). This bee is kept for its honey and for the pollination of the coffee plants. The trigona scaptotrigona can also be found in Africa and Australia. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105258

The guard bees watch over the entrance to the hive, a veritable

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On the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, AustraliaOn the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, AustraliaOn the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105161

On the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a

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Urban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” GermanyUrban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” GermanyUrban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103639

Urban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles

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Urban Beekeeping - “Berlinbees” is written on the beeswax frames of the Berlin Cathedral. Since 2011 and the Berlin Summt (Berlin is Buzzing) program which placed hives on well-known public buildings in Berlin, the Berliners really have the impression that their city buzzes with bees. However, Berlin already counted 750 beekeepers and nearly 2500 hives throughout the year and over 15,000 during the blossoming of the Lindens when professional beekeepers bring their hives into the city. GermanyUrban Beekeeping - “Berlinbees” is written on the beeswax frames of the Berlin Cathedral. Since 2011 and the Berlin Summt (Berlin is Buzzing) program which placed hives on well-known public buildings in Berlin, the Berliners really have the impression that their city buzzes with bees. However, Berlin already counted 750 beekeepers and nearly 2500 hives throughout the year and over 15,000 during the blossoming of the Lindens when professional beekeepers bring their hives into the city. GermanyUrban Beekeeping - “Berlinbees” is written on the beeswax frames of the Berlin Cathedral. Since 2011 and the Berlin Summt (Berlin is Buzzing) program which placed hives on well-known public buildings in Berlin, the Berliners really have the impression that their city buzzes with bees. However, Berlin already counted 750 beekeepers and nearly 2500 hives throughout the year and over 15,000 during the blossoming of the Lindens when professional beekeepers bring their hives into the city. Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103631

Urban Beekeeping - “Berlinbees” is written on the beeswax

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Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USA© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103626

Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She

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Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USA© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103625

Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She

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A bee lands on a cardoon flower. It's wings can flap more than 200 times per second. They carry the worker bee up to three kilometres from the hive at an average speed of 20km/h (peaking at 50 km/h). In this photo taken at 1/2000 of a second, we can see the wing's movement.A bee lands on a cardoon flower. It's wings can flap more than 200 times per second. They carry the worker bee up to three kilometres from the hive at an average speed of 20km/h (peaking at 50 km/h). In this photo taken at 1/2000 of a second, we can see the wing's movement.A bee lands on a cardoon flower. It's wings can flap more than 200 times per second. They carry the worker bee up to three kilometres from the hive at an average speed of 20km/h (peaking at 50 km/h). In this photo taken at 1/2000 of a second, we can see the wing's movement.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103600

A bee lands on a cardoon flower. It's wings can flap more than

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Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Honey is made from the flowers' nectar, certain components of which are hard to digest. When the worker bees bring the pollen back to the hive, they transfer it through trophallaxis (mouth-to-mouth) to the receiving bees. These latter transfer it several times between their mouth and their crop then pass it on to other receiving bees and so on. Under the effects of an enzyme from glandular secretions, the invertase, the sugars are slowly modified.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Honey is made from the flowers' nectar, certain components of which are hard to digest. When the worker bees bring the pollen back to the hive, they transfer it through trophallaxis (mouth-to-mouth) to the receiving bees. These latter transfer it several times between their mouth and their crop then pass it on to other receiving bees and so on. Under the effects of an enzyme from glandular secretions, the invertase, the sugars are slowly modified.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Honey is made from the flowers' nectar, certain components of which are hard to digest. When the worker bees bring the pollen back to the hive, they transfer it through trophallaxis (mouth-to-mouth) to the receiving bees. These latter transfer it several times between their mouth and their crop then pass it on to other receiving bees and so on. Under the effects of an enzyme from glandular secretions, the invertase, the sugars are slowly modified.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103599

Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Honey is made from the

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Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - During the construction of the wax combs, the bees make a chain to pass the flakes of wax on to the bees near the combs.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - During the construction of the wax combs, the bees make a chain to pass the flakes of wax on to the bees near the combs.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - During the construction of the wax combs, the bees make a chain to pass the flakes of wax on to the bees near the combs.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103597

Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - During the construction

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Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Opening a beehive is amazingItalian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Opening a beehive is amazingItalian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Opening a beehive is amazing© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103590

Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Opening a beehive is

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103585

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax comb. They start at the top and little by little connect the vertical honey combs.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103584

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The bees are busy building a new wax

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the brood, the bees incubate the sealed cells that contain the pupae to maintain their temperature at 35°. We can also see empty cells in the brood and others filled with bee bread (chunks of pollen) for raising the larvae.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the brood, the bees incubate the sealed cells that contain the pupae to maintain their temperature at 35°. We can also see empty cells in the brood and others filled with bee bread (chunks of pollen) for raising the larvae.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the brood, the bees incubate the sealed cells that contain the pupae to maintain their temperature at 35°. We can also see empty cells in the brood and others filled with bee bread (chunks of pollen) for raising the larvae.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103583

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the brood, the bees incubate the

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the flight board, a pollen carrying bee wipes the grains of pollen on its eyes and thorax with its front legs. Then, one of its sisters approaches to test the pollen's quality.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the flight board, a pollen carrying bee wipes the grains of pollen on its eyes and thorax with its front legs. Then, one of its sisters approaches to test the pollen's quality.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the flight board, a pollen carrying bee wipes the grains of pollen on its eyes and thorax with its front legs. Then, one of its sisters approaches to test the pollen's quality.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103582

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On the flight board, a pollen

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In this photo of bees on a brood frame, we can observe the difference in color of certain bees, which attests to the genetic mixing between different lines of half-sister. This genetic mixing is the result of the fertilization of the queen by a dozen or more males.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In this photo of bees on a brood frame, we can observe the difference in color of certain bees, which attests to the genetic mixing between different lines of half-sister. This genetic mixing is the result of the fertilization of the queen by a dozen or more males.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In this photo of bees on a brood frame, we can observe the difference in color of certain bees, which attests to the genetic mixing between different lines of half-sister. This genetic mixing is the result of the fertilization of the queen by a dozen or more males.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103581

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In this photo of bees on a brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bees on the honey combs of a natural wax construction. In the natural nest, the bees do not always build parallel combs but adapt the nest's architecture to the environment for more robustness.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bees on the honey combs of a natural wax construction. In the natural nest, the bees do not always build parallel combs but adapt the nest's architecture to the environment for more robustness.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bees on the honey combs of a natural wax construction. In the natural nest, the bees do not always build parallel combs but adapt the nest's architecture to the environment for more robustness.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103580

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bees on the honey combs of a natural

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two bees on cells of honey feeding themselves.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two bees on cells of honey feeding themselves.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two bees on cells of honey feeding themselves.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103579

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two bees on cells of honey feeding

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees control the temperature of the brood of bees and of males.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees control the temperature of the brood of bees and of males.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees control the temperature of the brood of bees and of males.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103578

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees control the

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bee bread is raw pollen fermented by the bees in the hive's cells. Its nutritional value and antibiotic properties is three times greater than those of normal pollen. It has bactericide; bacteriostatic and germicide properties.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bee bread is raw pollen fermented by the bees in the hive's cells. Its nutritional value and antibiotic properties is three times greater than those of normal pollen. It has bactericide; bacteriostatic and germicide properties.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bee bread is raw pollen fermented by the bees in the hive's cells. Its nutritional value and antibiotic properties is three times greater than those of normal pollen. It has bactericide; bacteriostatic and germicide properties.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103577

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Bee bread is raw pollen fermented by

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103576

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybees nurses on pollen cells-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybees nurses on pollen cells-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybees nurses on pollen cells-© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103575

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybees nurses on pollen cells-

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A multitude of bees between two frames. From 20,000 to 80,000 worker live in a hive, even more during the good season, 1000 drones (males) and a queen.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A multitude of bees between two frames. From 20,000 to 80,000 worker live in a hive, even more during the good season, 1000 drones (males) and a queen.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A multitude of bees between two frames. From 20,000 to 80,000 worker live in a hive, even more during the good season, 1000 drones (males) and a queen.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103574

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A multitude of bees between two

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Fanning bees in full force on the flight board. The fanning bees (+- 18 days after birth) create an air stream through the colony to decrease the humidity, regulate the temperature and renew the air.-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Fanning bees in full force on the flight board. The fanning bees (+- 18 days after birth) create an air stream through the colony to decrease the humidity, regulate the temperature and renew the air.-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Fanning bees in full force on the flight board. The fanning bees (+- 18 days after birth) create an air stream through the colony to decrease the humidity, regulate the temperature and renew the air.-© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103573

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Fanning bees in full force on the

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the warmth of the wax nest, the bees build the wax combs and the cells for storing the honey and raising the brood.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the warmth of the wax nest, the bees build the wax combs and the cells for storing the honey and raising the brood.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the warmth of the wax nest, the bees build the wax combs and the cells for storing the honey and raising the brood.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103572

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the warmth of the wax nest, the

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103571

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103570

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee encounters a Thomisidae hidden in a field scabious flower. Commonly called a crab spider, it hunts the bees on the flowers with a very particular technique. The spider grabs the bee with its legs, disorients it with rapid movements then sinks its fangs into the bee's thorax.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee encounters a Thomisidae hidden in a field scabious flower. Commonly called a crab spider, it hunts the bees on the flowers with a very particular technique. The spider grabs the bee with its legs, disorients it with rapid movements then sinks its fangs into the bee's thorax.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee encounters a Thomisidae hidden in a field scabious flower. Commonly called a crab spider, it hunts the bees on the flowers with a very particular technique. The spider grabs the bee with its legs, disorients it with rapid movements then sinks its fangs into the bee's thorax.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103567

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee encounters a Thomisidae hidden

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee secreting wax scales. The bee has 8 wax glands of which the bee controls the functioning in well-determined, heat and dietary conditions. Only the bees between the ages of 12 to 18 days produce wax.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee secreting wax scales. The bee has 8 wax glands of which the bee controls the functioning in well-determined, heat and dietary conditions. Only the bees between the ages of 12 to 18 days produce wax.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee secreting wax scales. The bee has 8 wax glands of which the bee controls the functioning in well-determined, heat and dietary conditions. Only the bees between the ages of 12 to 18 days produce wax.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103566

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee secreting wax scales. The bee

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive on the cells full of pollen, a bee transports two grains of pollen pollen baskets. A stock keeping bee approaches to test the food before unloading it.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive on the cells full of pollen, a bee transports two grains of pollen pollen baskets. A stock keeping bee approaches to test the food before unloading it.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive on the cells full of pollen, a bee transports two grains of pollen pollen baskets. A stock keeping bee approaches to test the food before unloading it.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103565

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive on the cells full of

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm lands on a branch while waiting to find a habitat. The swarm is made up of the old queen, drones and half the worker bees from the original colony. A few dozen explorer bees set off on reconnaissance flights to search for their new habitat.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm lands on a branch while waiting to find a habitat. The swarm is made up of the old queen, drones and half the worker bees from the original colony. A few dozen explorer bees set off on reconnaissance flights to search for their new habitat.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm lands on a branch while waiting to find a habitat. The swarm is made up of the old queen, drones and half the worker bees from the original colony. A few dozen explorer bees set off on reconnaissance flights to search for their new habitat.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103564

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm lands on a branch while

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A beekeeper face to face with a swarm of bees.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A beekeeper face to face with a swarm of bees.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A beekeeper face to face with a swarm of bees.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103563

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A beekeeper face to face with a

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm of bees on a branch of a cherry tree.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm of bees on a branch of a cherry tree.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm of bees on a branch of a cherry tree.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103562

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A swarm of bees on a branch of a

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Brother Adam from Buckfast Abbey in England was one of the pioneers in the hybridization of bees. He developed this hybrid bee to obtain “the ideal bee”. At the time, it was a question of improving the local race decimated by the Isle of Wight disease (caused by Acaparis woodi). Today, the beekeepers pursue his methods in order to find an excellent foraging bee, clean, not very aggressive and also with a lower propensity for swarming. The Buckfast is thus the result of a hybridization that professionals consider a success.-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Brother Adam from Buckfast Abbey in England was one of the pioneers in the hybridization of bees. He developed this hybrid bee to obtain “the ideal bee”. At the time, it was a question of improving the local race decimated by the Isle of Wight disease (caused by Acaparis woodi). Today, the beekeepers pursue his methods in order to find an excellent foraging bee, clean, not very aggressive and also with a lower propensity for swarming. The Buckfast is thus the result of a hybridization that professionals consider a success.-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Brother Adam from Buckfast Abbey in England was one of the pioneers in the hybridization of bees. He developed this hybrid bee to obtain “the ideal bee”. At the time, it was a question of improving the local race decimated by the Isle of Wight disease (caused by Acaparis woodi). Today, the beekeepers pursue his methods in order to find an excellent foraging bee, clean, not very aggressive and also with a lower propensity for swarming. The Buckfast is thus the result of a hybridization that professionals consider a success.-© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2103561

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Brother Adam from Buckfast Abbey in

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