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Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic

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Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom

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Photo denunciation, garbage in the sea. No matter the place if not the consequences. Curiously, some waste becomes a refuge for some species. Grey triggerfish (Balistes capriscus).Photo denunciation, garbage in the sea. No matter the place if not the consequences. Curiously, some waste becomes a refuge for some species. Grey triggerfish (Balistes capriscus).Photo denunciation, garbage in the sea. No matter the place if not the consequences. Curiously, some waste becomes a refuge for some species. Grey triggerfish (Balistes capriscus).© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Photo denunciation, garbage in the sea. No matter the place if

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Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.© Sergi Garcia Fernandez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros

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Discarded waste on a beach in Tel Aviv after a storm, IsraelDiscarded waste on a beach in Tel Aviv after a storm, IsraelDiscarded waste on a beach in Tel Aviv after a storm, Israel© Franck Gueffier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Discarded waste on a beach in Tel Aviv after a storm, Israel

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Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water. AtlanticSubmarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water. AtlanticSubmarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water. Atlantic© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails

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Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water.Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water.Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails and the fact that the negative effects on the environmental impact can always be reduced, in this image it is a controlled discharge of treated water.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Submarine emissary. In spite of the visual impact that it entails

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Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It

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Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It does not matter the place if not the consequences.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Photo complaint, garbage in the sea. Abandoned fishing pots. It

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Wrecks of abandoned vintage cars in a wood, Savoie, FranceWrecks of abandoned vintage cars in a wood, Savoie, FranceWrecks of abandoned vintage cars in a wood, Savoie, France© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Wrecks of abandoned vintage cars in a wood, Savoie, France

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Thread algae growing on Cryptocorynes in aquariumThread algae growing on Cryptocorynes in aquariumThread algae growing on Cryptocorynes in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Thread algae growing on Cryptocorynes in aquarium

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Thread algae in aquariumThread algae in aquariumThread algae in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Thread algae in aquarium

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Thread algae growing on aquarium plantThread algae growing on aquarium plantThread algae growing on aquarium plant© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Thread algae growing on aquarium plant

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A floating, abandoned net in the ocean, Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean.A floating, abandoned net in the ocean, Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean.A floating, abandoned net in the ocean, Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean.© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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A floating, abandoned net in the ocean, Dominica, Caribbean Sea,

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River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France -

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Bacteria and dead leaves on a polluted river. The Seran, in Bugey, Ain, France. Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.Bacteria and dead leaves on a polluted river. The Seran, in Bugey, Ain, France. Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.Bacteria and dead leaves on a polluted river. The Seran, in Bugey, Ain, France. Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bacteria and dead leaves on a polluted river. The Seran, in

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River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France - Very high summer season due to various water withdrawals and drought. The presence of nitrates and phosphates causes proliferation of algae and bacteria.© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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River polluted at low water. Seran river, in Bugey, Ain, France -

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Green algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, FranceGreen algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, FranceGreen algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, France© Frédéric Tournay / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz

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Green algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, FranceGreen algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, FranceGreen algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz Scaff, Plougrescant, Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, France© Frédéric Tournay / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green algae (Ulva spp) at the exit of a channeled creek, Porz

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag

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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

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Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405317

Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny

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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

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Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401764

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401762

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401761

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401760

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401759

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401758

Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge

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Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401757

Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in

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Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401756

Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the

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Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401755

Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic

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Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401754

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic,

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Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401753

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic,

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Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401752

Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the

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Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401751

Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the

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Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401750

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a

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Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401749

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2399587

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2399586

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of

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Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2399585

Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of

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Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of them has been rescued alive and the other died. The place does not matter, but the problem generated by the interaction of man in the sea.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2399584

Loggerhead turtle (caretta caretta) trapped by a nylon. One of

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Several Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. These fishes feed mostly on seaweeds that grow on the rocks but also eat jellyfishes. This translucent white plastic bottle should look to them very similar to a jellyfish. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite imageSeveral Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. These fishes feed mostly on seaweeds that grow on the rocks but also eat jellyfishes. This translucent white plastic bottle should look to them very similar to a jellyfish. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite imageSeveral Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. These fishes feed mostly on seaweeds that grow on the rocks but also eat jellyfishes. This translucent white plastic bottle should look to them very similar to a jellyfish. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397562

Several Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a

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Stellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite imageStellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite imageStellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397561

Stellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle.

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Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397560

Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup.

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Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397559

Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic

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Golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageGolden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageGolden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397558

Golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle.

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397557

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397556

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397555

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian

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Six pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imageSix pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imageSix pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397554

Six pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish

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Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397553

Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes

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Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397552

Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young

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Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397551

Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus

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Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. Azores© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397550

Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397549

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397548

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Concept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean. A young Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus), is eating the algae that grows on the skull surface. Kuwait, Persian Gulf. Composite imageConcept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean. A young Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus), is eating the algae that grows on the skull surface. Kuwait, Persian Gulf. Composite imageConcept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean. A young Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus), is eating the algae that grows on the skull surface. Kuwait, Persian Gulf. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397547

Concept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage

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Concept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean.. Kuwait, Persian GulfConcept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean.. Kuwait, Persian GulfConcept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage drifting in the oceans. Toy representing a skull in the middle of various plastic garbage floating in the ocean.. Kuwait, Persian Gulf© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397546

Concept image alluding to death caused by plastic garbage

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Sea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397545

Sea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite

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Sea turtle eating a detergent plastic bottle. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent plastic bottle. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent plastic bottle. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397544

Sea turtle eating a detergent plastic bottle. Tailand - Composite

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Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397543

Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is

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Sea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397542

Sea turtle eating a detergent styrofoam cup. Tailand - Composite

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Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397541

Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is

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Sea lion nibbling a plastic bottle underwater. - Composite image. Composite imageSea lion nibbling a plastic bottle underwater. - Composite image. Composite imageSea lion nibbling a plastic bottle underwater. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397540

Sea lion nibbling a plastic bottle underwater. - Composite image.

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Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397539

Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped

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Young northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), tangled in a nylon rope, and dragging grimly behind her a string of nets, cables, and fishing wires. Is doomed to die of hunger or to infect the wound in the neck. USAYoung northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), tangled in a nylon rope, and dragging grimly behind her a string of nets, cables, and fishing wires. Is doomed to die of hunger or to infect the wound in the neck. USAYoung northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), tangled in a nylon rope, and dragging grimly behind her a string of nets, cables, and fishing wires. Is doomed to die of hunger or to infect the wound in the neck. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397538

Young northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), tangled in a nylon

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Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397537

Sea lion, with nylon strings and piece of fishing net wrapped

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Young sea lion playing with plastic bottle. - Composite image. Composite imageYoung sea lion playing with plastic bottle. - Composite image. Composite imageYoung sea lion playing with plastic bottle. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397536

Young sea lion playing with plastic bottle. - Composite image.

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California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with nylon strings wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound. USACalifornia sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with nylon strings wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound. USACalifornia sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with nylon strings wrapped around his neck that caused him a deep wound. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397535

California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with nylon strings

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Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite imageHawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite imageHawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397534

Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty

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Hermit crab using a small plastic football ball as a shell. Funny wildlife. Seychelles - Composite image. Composite imageHermit crab using a small plastic football ball as a shell. Funny wildlife. Seychelles - Composite image. Composite imageHermit crab using a small plastic football ball as a shell. Funny wildlife. Seychelles - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397533

Hermit crab using a small plastic football ball as a shell. Funny

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Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397528

Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image.

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Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397527

Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image.

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Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397526

Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image.

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Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397525

Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image.

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Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397524

Plastic turtle thrown by the sea in a beach. - Composite image.

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Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2397131

Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin

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Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin can, Lembeh Strait, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2397130

Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a tin

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Invasion of the small port of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, by seaweed Sargasso, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, June 2018Invasion of the small port of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, by seaweed Sargasso, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, June 2018Invasion of the small port of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, by seaweed Sargasso, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, June 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396921

Invasion of the small port of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, by

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Massive stranding of Sargasso on the strike of the Porte d'enfer, town of Moule, Guadeloupe, May 2018Massive stranding of Sargasso on the strike of the Porte d'enfer, town of Moule, Guadeloupe, May 2018Massive stranding of Sargasso on the strike of the Porte d'enfer, town of Moule, Guadeloupe, May 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396920

Massive stranding of Sargasso on the strike of the Porte d'enfer,

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Sargasso Bank drifting off Pointe des Châteaux, municipality of Saint François, Guadeloupe, May 2018Sargasso Bank drifting off Pointe des Châteaux, municipality of Saint François, Guadeloupe, May 2018Sargasso Bank drifting off Pointe des Châteaux, municipality of Saint François, Guadeloupe, May 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396919

Sargasso Bank drifting off Pointe des Châteaux, municipality of

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Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396918

Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of

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Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396917

Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of

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Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of Gosier, Guadeloupe, French West Indies, May 2018© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396916

Stranding of Sargasso on the beach of Saint Felix, commune of

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Ocean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageOcean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageOcean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396879

Ocean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by

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Airliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West IndiesAirliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West IndiesAirliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West Indies© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2396024

Airliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West Indies

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Airliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West IndiesAirliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West IndiesAirliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West Indies© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2396023

Airliner landing at Saint Martin airport, West Indies

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