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White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2153238

White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with

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Pantherophis guttatus, two headed snakePantherophis guttatus, two headed snakePantherophis guttatus, two headed snake© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2124772

Pantherophis guttatus, two headed snake

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Pinnate bat fish juvenile (Platax pinnatus), Lembeh IndonesiaPinnate bat fish juvenile (Platax pinnatus), Lembeh IndonesiaPinnate bat fish juvenile (Platax pinnatus), Lembeh Indonesia© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2118778

Pinnate bat fish juvenile (Platax pinnatus), Lembeh Indonesia

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Southern Brown Egg Eater (Dasypeltis inornata) a egg, Sub-Saharan Africa.Southern Brown Egg Eater (Dasypeltis inornata) a egg, Sub-Saharan Africa.Southern Brown Egg Eater (Dasypeltis inornata) a egg, Sub-Saharan Africa.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081742

Southern Brown Egg Eater (Dasypeltis inornata) a egg, Sub-Saharan

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Tomato grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) at shrimp cleaningTomato grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) at shrimp cleaningTomato grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) at shrimp cleaning© Vincent Truchet / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072476

Tomato grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) at shrimp cleaning

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Portrait of Dusky Parrotfish - French Polynesia Portrait of Dusky Parrotfish - French Polynesia Portrait of Dusky Parrotfish - French Polynesia © Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2042038

Portrait of Dusky Parrotfish - French Polynesia

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Bornean Orang-utan female and young Bornean Orang-utan female and young Bornean Orang-utan female and young © Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

1992608

Bornean Orang-utan female and young

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Bornean Orang-utan female and young Bornean Orang-utan female and young Bornean Orang-utan female and young © Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

1992607

Bornean Orang-utan female and young

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Female Bornean Orang-utanFemale Bornean Orang-utanFemale Bornean Orang-utan© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

1992605

Female Bornean Orang-utan

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Manta ray face to faceManta ray face to faceManta ray face to face© Vincent Truchet / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

1987399

Manta ray face to face

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Portrait of a Sloane's viperfishPortrait of a Sloane's viperfishPortrait of a Sloane's viperfish© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1968065

Portrait of a Sloane's viperfish

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Magnificent Sea Anemone eating Striped Butterflyfish Red SeaMagnificent Sea Anemone eating Striped Butterflyfish Red SeaMagnificent Sea Anemone eating Striped Butterflyfish Red Sea© Jeffrey Rotman / BiosphotoJPG - RM

892207

Magnificent Sea Anemone eating Striped Butterflyfish Red Sea

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" on a black background in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" on a black background in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" on a black background in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" on a black background

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi yellow and black in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi yellow and black in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi yellow and black in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411595

Short-tailed betta male plakat koi yellow and black in aquarium

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" two males displaying in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" two males displaying in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" two males displaying in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" two males displaying

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Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" in aquariumShort-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411593

Short-tailed betta male plakat koi "candy" in aquarium

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Betta male in aquariumBetta male in aquariumBetta male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411592

Betta male in aquarium

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Betta male full moon or over 180 ° in aquariumBetta male full moon or over 180 ° in aquariumBetta male full moon or over 180 ° in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411591

Betta male full moon or over 180 ° in aquarium

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Toba betta (Betta rubra) male in aquariumToba betta (Betta rubra) male in aquariumToba betta (Betta rubra) male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411590

Toba betta (Betta rubra) male in aquarium

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The Banded red snake (Lycodon rufozonatum ) is found across a large part of East Asia, from the Korean Peninsula in the north (and extending just into easternmost Russia) to northern Laos and Vietnam in the south,the bulk of its range in found in eastern China.The Banded red snake (Lycodon rufozonatum ) is found across a large part of East Asia, from the Korean Peninsula in the north (and extending just into easternmost Russia) to northern Laos and Vietnam in the south,the bulk of its range in found in eastern China.The Banded red snake (Lycodon rufozonatum ) is found across a large part of East Asia, from the Korean Peninsula in the north (and extending just into easternmost Russia) to northern Laos and Vietnam in the south,the bulk of its range in found in eastern China.© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2410586

The Banded red snake (Lycodon rufozonatum ) is found across a

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black samurai.© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) Variety Plakat black

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Four-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, PortugalFour-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, PortugalFour-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Four-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407994

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, SvalbardSnow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, SvalbardSnow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, Svalbard© Raphaël Sané / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

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Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its

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Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, SvalbardSnow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, SvalbardSnow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its chicks in a nest built in a whale vertebra, Svalbard© Raphaël Sané / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

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Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) adult male feeding its

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Glowlight rasbora (Trigonostigma hengeli) Rasbora profil in aquariumGlowlight rasbora (Trigonostigma hengeli) Rasbora profil in aquariumGlowlight rasbora (Trigonostigma hengeli) Rasbora profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Glowlight rasbora (Trigonostigma hengeli) Rasbora profil in

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Inca Stone Fish (Tahuantinsuyoa macantzatza) male profil in aquariumInca Stone Fish (Tahuantinsuyoa macantzatza) male profil in aquariumInca Stone Fish (Tahuantinsuyoa macantzatza) male profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406451

Inca Stone Fish (Tahuantinsuyoa macantzatza) male profil in

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Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus coloured in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus coloured in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus coloured in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406450

Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus coloured in aquarium

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Striped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), Striped panchax profil in aquariumStriped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), Striped panchax profil in aquariumStriped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), Striped panchax profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Striped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), Striped panchax profil in

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Striped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), 2 Striped panchax profil in aquariumStriped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), 2 Striped panchax profil in aquariumStriped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), 2 Striped panchax profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Striped panchax (Aplocheilus lineatus), 2 Striped panchax profil

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Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406447

Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquarium

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Aspe (Aspius aspius). Aspe juvénile en aquariumAspe (Aspius aspius). Aspe juvénile en aquariumAspe (Aspius aspius). Aspe juvénile en aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406445

Aspe (Aspius aspius). Aspe juvénile en aquarium

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta half moon mustardgasSiamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta half moon mustardgasSiamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta half moon mustardgas© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406444

Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta half moon

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Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta male full moon in aquariumSiamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta male full moon in aquariumSiamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta male full moon in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406443

Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), Betta male full moon in

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African Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquariumAfrican Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquariumAfrican Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406442

African Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male

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Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquariumDistichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Distichodus (Distichodus lefini), Distichodus in aquarium

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(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus), Rainbow sharkminnow albino in aquarium(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus), Rainbow sharkminnow albino in aquarium(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus), Rainbow sharkminnow albino in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406434

(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus), Rainbow sharkminnow albino in aquarium

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Hump-head (Cyrtocara moorii), Hump-head male profile in aquariumHump-head (Cyrtocara moorii), Hump-head male profile in aquariumHump-head (Cyrtocara moorii), Hump-head male profile in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406432

Hump-head (Cyrtocara moorii), Hump-head male profile in aquarium

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Kambuzi (Copadichromis spilonotus), mâle profile in aquariumKambuzi (Copadichromis spilonotus), mâle profile in aquariumKambuzi (Copadichromis spilonotus), mâle profile in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Kambuzi (Copadichromis spilonotus), mâle profile in aquarium

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Haplochromis salmon (Haplochromis sp) Haplochromis displaying in front of another maleHaplochromis salmon (Haplochromis sp) Haplochromis displaying in front of another maleHaplochromis salmon (Haplochromis sp) Haplochromis displaying in front of another male© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Haplochromis salmon (Haplochromis sp) Haplochromis displaying in

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Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406429

Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male

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Haplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquariumHaplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquariumHaplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406428

Haplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquarium

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Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406427

Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in

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Guppy Endler (Poecilia wingei). Guppy endler male variety Black fireGuppy Endler (Poecilia wingei). Guppy endler male variety Black fireGuppy Endler (Poecilia wingei). Guppy endler male variety Black fire© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406422

Guppy Endler (Poecilia wingei). Guppy endler male variety Black

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White-spotted Cichlid (Tropheus duboisi), Young in aquariumWhite-spotted Cichlid (Tropheus duboisi), Young in aquariumWhite-spotted Cichlid (Tropheus duboisi), Young in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406421

White-spotted Cichlid (Tropheus duboisi), Young in aquarium

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African Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquariumAfrican Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquariumAfrican Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406420

African Butterfly Cichlid (Anomalochromis thomasi) Thomasi male

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher). Pelmato male in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher). Pelmato male in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher). Pelmato male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher). Pelmato male in aquarium

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Molly saffron (Poecilia sphenops). Molly saffron male in aquariumMolly saffron (Poecilia sphenops). Molly saffron male in aquariumMolly saffron (Poecilia sphenops). Molly saffron male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Molly saffron (Poecilia sphenops). Molly saffron male in aquarium

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Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) red coral platyfish in

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Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus). Platy blue coral in aquariumPlaty (Xiphophorus maculatus). Platy blue coral in aquariumPlaty (Xiphophorus maculatus). Platy blue coral in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus). Platy blue coral in aquarium

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Haplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquariumHaplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquariumHaplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Haplochromis (Haplochromis theteuterion) Makobe. Male in aquarium

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Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis open mouth male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis open mouth male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis open mouth male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis open

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Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquariumPundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406400

Pundamilia (Pundamilia nyererei) Python Island. Haplochromis male

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Pygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Male in aquariumPygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Male in aquariumPygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Male in aquarium

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Pygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Female in aquariumPygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Female in aquariumPygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Female in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pygmy swordtail (Xiphophorus pygmaeus). Female in aquarium

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Armoured catfish (Nannoptopoma sp). Nannoptopoma profile posed on a root in aquariumArmoured catfish (Nannoptopoma sp). Nannoptopoma profile posed on a root in aquariumArmoured catfish (Nannoptopoma sp). Nannoptopoma profile posed on a root in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406389

Armoured catfish (Nannoptopoma sp). Nannoptopoma profile posed on

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Cherry barb (Puntius titteya), Cherry barb male in aquariumCherry barb (Puntius titteya), Cherry barb male in aquariumCherry barb (Puntius titteya), Cherry barb male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406379

Cherry barb (Puntius titteya), Cherry barb male in aquarium

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Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) Guppy full black male in aquariumGuppy (Poecilia reticulata) Guppy full black male in aquariumGuppy (Poecilia reticulata) Guppy full black male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406377

Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) Guppy full black male in aquarium

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Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus), Platy Hi fin red (veil) in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus), Platy Hi fin red (veil) in aquariumSouthern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus), Platy Hi fin red (veil) in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Southern platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus), Platy Hi fin red

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato male in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato male in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato male in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato male in aquarium

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Platy parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy male variety Hawaii in aquariumPlaty parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy male variety Hawaii in aquariumPlaty parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy male variety Hawaii in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Platy parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy male variety Hawaii in

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Platy parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy female variety Hawaii in aquariumPlaty parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy female variety Hawaii in aquariumPlaty parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy female variety Hawaii in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Platy parrot (Xiphophorus variatus). Platy female variety Hawaii

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato female in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato female in aquariumPelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato female in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pelmato (Pelvicachromis pulcher), Pelmato female in aquarium

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406357

Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium

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Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) male guppy mozaic in aquariumGuppy (Poecilia reticulata) male guppy mozaic in aquariumGuppy (Poecilia reticulata) male guppy mozaic in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) male guppy mozaic in aquarium

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Guppy (Poecilia reticulata), Aquarium with several guppy malesGuppy (Poecilia reticulata), Aquarium with several guppy malesGuppy (Poecilia reticulata), Aquarium with several guppy males© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Guppy (Poecilia reticulata), Aquarium with several guppy males

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), group profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), group profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), group profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), group profil in aquarium

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Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquariumDadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406348

Dadio (Laubuca dadiburjori), profil in aquarium

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405137

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405135

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405130

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405129

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405128

Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio

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Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405126

Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405125

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the

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Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405123

Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs

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Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405122

Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing

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Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403441

Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close

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Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403440

Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on

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Several Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. Group of animals eating a jellyfish. These fish have already been seen to nibble on translucent plastic objects that look quite like a jellyfish to them. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite imageSeveral Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. Group of animals eating a jellyfish. These fish have already been seen to nibble on translucent plastic objects that look quite like a jellyfish to them. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite imageSeveral Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a plastic bottle. Group of animals eating a jellyfish. These fish have already been seen to nibble on translucent plastic objects that look quite like a jellyfish to them. Kuwait, Persian Gulf - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397563

Several Streaked spinefoot (Siganus javus) eating a piece of a

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Stellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite imageStellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite imageStellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle. Philippines - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397561

Stellate puffer (Arothron stellatus) eating a plastic bottle.

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Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397560

Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup.

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Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397559

Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic

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Golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageGolden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageGolden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397558

Golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) eating plastic bottle.

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Silver-cheeked toadfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus). Young animal. Red SeaSilver-cheeked toadfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus). Young animal. Red SeaSilver-cheeked toadfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus). Young animal. Red Sea© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397532

Silver-cheeked toadfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus). Young animal.

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Tripodfish or tripod spiderfish (Bathypterois grallator). Composite imageTripodfish or tripod spiderfish (Bathypterois grallator). Composite imageTripodfish or tripod spiderfish (Bathypterois grallator). Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2394472

Tripodfish or tripod spiderfish (Bathypterois grallator).

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Female Short-finned Molly, Poecilia sphenops. Dalmatian Lyretail variety. Mollies are strictly American fish, found particularly around Central America and the Southern United States. While many fish in this genus can be found in the wild they have been kept by aquarists for decades.Female Short-finned Molly, Poecilia sphenops. Dalmatian Lyretail variety. Mollies are strictly American fish, found particularly around Central America and the Southern United States. While many fish in this genus can be found in the wild they have been kept by aquarists for decades.Female Short-finned Molly, Poecilia sphenops. Dalmatian Lyretail variety. Mollies are strictly American fish, found particularly around Central America and the Southern United States. While many fish in this genus can be found in the wild they have been kept by aquarists for decades.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393054

Female Short-finned Molly, Poecilia sphenops. Dalmatian Lyretail

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Green swordtail couple (female bellow), Xiphophorus hellerii. The name ‘swordtail’ is derived from the elongated lower lobe of the male’s caudal fin. It's a popular aquarium fish but has become a nuisance pest as an introduced species in a number of countries. It has caused ecological damage because of its ability to rapidly reproduce in high numbers. Native from North and Central America.Green swordtail couple (female bellow), Xiphophorus hellerii. The name ‘swordtail’ is derived from the elongated lower lobe of the male’s caudal fin. It's a popular aquarium fish but has become a nuisance pest as an introduced species in a number of countries. It has caused ecological damage because of its ability to rapidly reproduce in high numbers. Native from North and Central America.Green swordtail couple (female bellow), Xiphophorus hellerii. The name ‘swordtail’ is derived from the elongated lower lobe of the male’s caudal fin. It's a popular aquarium fish but has become a nuisance pest as an introduced species in a number of countries. It has caused ecological damage because of its ability to rapidly reproduce in high numbers. Native from North and Central America.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393053

Green swordtail couple (female bellow), Xiphophorus hellerii. The

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detail of human eyedetail of human eyedetail of human eye© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2392324

detail of human eye

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Goldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black backgroundGoldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black backgroundGoldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black background© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171548

Goldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black background

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Goldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black backgroundGoldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black backgroundGoldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black background© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171547

Goldfish (Carassius auratus) 'Red Cap Oranda' on black background

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Pearly razorfish (Xyrichtys novacula) Composite image. Portugal.. Composite imagePearly razorfish (Xyrichtys novacula) Composite image. Portugal.. Composite imagePearly razorfish (Xyrichtys novacula) Composite image. Portugal.. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168148

Pearly razorfish (Xyrichtys novacula) Composite image. Portugal..

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Iberian-roach, Squalius alburnoides. Couple. Endemic species of the Iberian peninsula. It is restricted to the southwest of the Iberian peninsula in Portugal and Spain. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageIberian-roach, Squalius alburnoides. Couple. Endemic species of the Iberian peninsula. It is restricted to the southwest of the Iberian peninsula in Portugal and Spain. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageIberian-roach, Squalius alburnoides. Couple. Endemic species of the Iberian peninsula. It is restricted to the southwest of the Iberian peninsula in Portugal and Spain. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168111

Iberian-roach, Squalius alburnoides. Couple. Endemic species of

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Escalo-do-Arade, Squalius aradensis. Endemic species to Portugal. Restricted to three river basins Arade, Algibre and Bordeira. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageEscalo-do-Arade, Squalius aradensis. Endemic species to Portugal. Restricted to three river basins Arade, Algibre and Bordeira. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageEscalo-do-Arade, Squalius aradensis. Endemic species to Portugal. Restricted to three river basins Arade, Algibre and Bordeira. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168109

Escalo-do-Arade, Squalius aradensis. Endemic species to Portugal.

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Saramugo, Anaecypris hispanica, It is the only living member of the genus Anaecypris, that can be found in Spain and Portugal. It is threatened by habitat loss. Considered the most endangered primary fish in Iberian waters. On soft mud bottom river. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageSaramugo, Anaecypris hispanica, It is the only living member of the genus Anaecypris, that can be found in Spain and Portugal. It is threatened by habitat loss. Considered the most endangered primary fish in Iberian waters. On soft mud bottom river. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite imageSaramugo, Anaecypris hispanica, It is the only living member of the genus Anaecypris, that can be found in Spain and Portugal. It is threatened by habitat loss. Considered the most endangered primary fish in Iberian waters. On soft mud bottom river. Digital composite. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168090

Saramugo, Anaecypris hispanica, It is the only living member of

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