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383 pictures found

snooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia .Pacific Oceansnooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia .Pacific Oceansnooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia .Pacific Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2437412

snooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica,

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Pelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French PolynesiaPelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French PolynesiaPelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French Polynesia© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents
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2397174

Pelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the

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Chameleon prawn (Hippolyte varians) on a colony Star ascidians (Botryllus schlosseri), Bergen, Hordaland, Norway, EuropeChameleon prawn (Hippolyte varians) on a colony Star ascidians (Botryllus schlosseri), Bergen, Hordaland, Norway, EuropeChameleon prawn (Hippolyte varians) on a colony Star ascidians (Botryllus schlosseri), Bergen, Hordaland, Norway, Europe© SeaTops / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2417830

Chameleon prawn (Hippolyte varians) on a colony Star ascidians

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Salpe, planktonic tunicate (Pegea confoederata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate (Pegea confoederata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate (Pegea confoederata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2465184

Salpe, planktonic tunicate (Pegea confoederata). Marine

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Various individuals from salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Various individuals from salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Various individuals from salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2464821

Various individuals from salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic

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Thetys Salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Thetys Salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Thetys Salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2464820

Thetys Salpe (Thetys vagina), planktonic tunicate. Marine

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Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2463390

Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary

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Sea squirt (Halocynthia papillosa). Hard and rough cartilaginous tunic about 6 cm in length. It is fed by filtration of the organic matter in suspension. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Sea squirt (Halocynthia papillosa). Hard and rough cartilaginous tunic about 6 cm in length. It is fed by filtration of the organic matter in suspension. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Sea squirt (Halocynthia papillosa). Hard and rough cartilaginous tunic about 6 cm in length. It is fed by filtration of the organic matter in suspension. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2462573

Sea squirt (Halocynthia papillosa). Hard and rough cartilaginous

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Seafan, Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and light-bulb sea squirt, Clavelina lepadiformis, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, MediterraneanSeafan, Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and light-bulb sea squirt, Clavelina lepadiformis, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, MediterraneanSeafan, Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and light-bulb sea squirt, Clavelina lepadiformis, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, Mediterranean© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2460464

Seafan, Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and light-bulb sea

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Seafan, Yellow and Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and Clavelina lepadiformis, light-bulb sea squirt, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, MediterraneanSeafan, Yellow and Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and Clavelina lepadiformis, light-bulb sea squirt, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, MediterraneanSeafan, Yellow and Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and Clavelina lepadiformis, light-bulb sea squirt, Punta Carena, Capri Island, Sorrentine Peninsula, Italy, Tyrrhenian Sea, Mediterranean© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2460462

Seafan, Yellow and Red Gorgonian, Paramuricea clavata and

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Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga) in the Thau lagoon, Mèze, Hérault, Occitania, France.Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga) in the Thau lagoon, Mèze, Hérault, Occitania, France.Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga) in the Thau lagoon, Mèze, Hérault, Occitania, France.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2459728

Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga) in the Thau lagoon, Mèze,

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Sponges and Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), colonising mangrove roots, in the National Park of the Queen's Gardens, CubaSponges and Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), colonising mangrove roots, in the National Park of the Queen's Gardens, CubaSponges and Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), colonising mangrove roots, in the National Park of the Queen's Gardens, Cuba© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2458745

2458745

Sponges and Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata),

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Orange flake-ascidian (Aplidium punctum)Orange flake-ascidian (Aplidium punctum)Orange flake-ascidian (Aplidium punctum)© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2458471

Orange flake-ascidian (Aplidium punctum)

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Sea squirt (Ciona robusta), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.Sea squirt (Ciona robusta), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.Sea squirt (Ciona robusta), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2453514

Sea squirt (Ciona robusta), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault,

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Bunch of Light bulb sea squirt (Clavelina lepadiformis), in the protected marine area of the Agathoise coast, Hérault, Occitania, FranceBunch of Light bulb sea squirt (Clavelina lepadiformis), in the protected marine area of the Agathoise coast, Hérault, Occitania, FranceBunch of Light bulb sea squirt (Clavelina lepadiformis), in the protected marine area of the Agathoise coast, Hérault, Occitania, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2453507

2453507

Bunch of Light bulb sea squirt (Clavelina lepadiformis), in the

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Bunch of Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.Bunch of Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.Bunch of Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga), in the Thau lagoon, Hérault, Occitania, France.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2453502

2453502

Bunch of Speckled sea-squirt (Clavelina oblonga), in the Thau

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Colony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, FranceColony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, FranceColony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2450240

Colony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope

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Colony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, FranceColony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, FranceColony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope under a pontoon, in front of Balaruc-les-Bains in the Thau lagoon, Herault, Occitania, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2450239

2450239

Colony of Compound ascidian (Botrylloides sp) covering a rope

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Group of ascidians on reef: Ink-spot sea squirt (Polycarpa aurata), Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum), Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle), Urn Ascidian (Didemnum sp), off Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaGroup of ascidians on reef: Ink-spot sea squirt (Polycarpa aurata), Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum), Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle), Urn Ascidian (Didemnum sp), off Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaGroup of ascidians on reef: Ink-spot sea squirt (Polycarpa aurata), Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum), Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle), Urn Ascidian (Didemnum sp), off Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2450238

Group of ascidians on reef: Ink-spot sea squirt (Polycarpa

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Colonial tunicate (Symplegma sp) on Red Boring Sponge (Cliona delitrix), in the Natural Marine Park of Martinique.Colonial tunicate (Symplegma sp) on Red Boring Sponge (Cliona delitrix), in the Natural Marine Park of Martinique.Colonial tunicate (Symplegma sp) on Red Boring Sponge (Cliona delitrix), in the Natural Marine Park of Martinique.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2449726

Colonial tunicate (Symplegma sp) on Red Boring Sponge (Cliona

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Blue Sea Squirt (Rhopalaea crassa), Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaBlue Sea Squirt (Rhopalaea crassa), Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaBlue Sea Squirt (Rhopalaea crassa), Gangga Island, North Sulawesi, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2449715

Blue Sea Squirt (Rhopalaea crassa), Gangga Island, North

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Close-up of the Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle) canal system, Bangka Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaClose-up of the Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle) canal system, Bangka Island, North Sulawesi, IndonesiaClose-up of the Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle) canal system, Bangka Island, North Sulawesi, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2449714

Close-up of the Tall Urn Ascidian (Didemnum molle) canal system,

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Blue Tunicate, Clavelina, Kimbe Bay, New Britain, Papua New GuineaBlue Tunicate, Clavelina, Kimbe Bay, New Britain, Papua New GuineaBlue Tunicate, Clavelina, Kimbe Bay, New Britain, Papua New Guinea© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2449662

Blue Tunicate, Clavelina, Kimbe Bay, New Britain, Papua New Guinea

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Phronima. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it raise its young. In this case the babies are very developed and the ones sitting on the outside of the Salp are ready to jump off and become independent. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanPhronima. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it raise its young. In this case the babies are very developed and the ones sitting on the outside of the Salp are ready to jump off and become independent. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanPhronima. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it raise its young. In this case the babies are very developed and the ones sitting on the outside of the Salp are ready to jump off and become independent. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2449390

2449390

Phronima. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps,

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Phronima and babies. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanPhronima and babies. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanPhronima and babies. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2449360

2449360

Phronima and babies. a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks

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White Speck Tunicate (Didemnum conchyliatum) in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceWhite Speck Tunicate (Didemnum conchyliatum) in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceWhite Speck Tunicate (Didemnum conchyliatum) in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2448444

2448444

White Speck Tunicate (Didemnum conchyliatum) in the Marine

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Orange-fringed blue sea squirt (Rhopalaea fusca), Cebu, PhilippinesOrange-fringed blue sea squirt (Rhopalaea fusca), Cebu, PhilippinesOrange-fringed blue sea squirt (Rhopalaea fusca), Cebu, Philippines© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2448434

Orange-fringed blue sea squirt (Rhopalaea fusca), Cebu,

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Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), in a cymodocea seagrass, off the lagoon of Ain Ghazalah, Libya. An antitumor agent, trabectedin, comes from this social ascidia.Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), in a cymodocea seagrass, off the lagoon of Ain Ghazalah, Libya. An antitumor agent, trabectedin, comes from this social ascidia.Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), in a cymodocea seagrass, off the lagoon of Ain Ghazalah, Libya. An antitumor agent, trabectedin, comes from this social ascidia.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2447787

Mangrove tunicate (Ecteinascidia turbinata), in a cymodocea

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Sea strawberry (Aplidium elegans)Sea strawberry (Aplidium elegans)Sea strawberry (Aplidium elegans)© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2447669

2447669

Sea strawberry (Aplidium elegans)

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Ascidian (Diazona violacea) off Barcarès, Marine Natural Park of the Gulf of Lion, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitanie, FranceAscidian (Diazona violacea) off Barcarès, Marine Natural Park of the Gulf of Lion, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitanie, FranceAscidian (Diazona violacea) off Barcarès, Marine Natural Park of the Gulf of Lion, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2445925

Ascidian (Diazona violacea) off Barcarès, Marine Natural Park of

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Lessepsian ascidians (Herdmania momus), in the Kas Kekova marine protected area, Turkey.Lessepsian ascidians (Herdmania momus), in the Kas Kekova marine protected area, Turkey.Lessepsian ascidians (Herdmania momus), in the Kas Kekova marine protected area, Turkey.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2445473

Lessepsian ascidians (Herdmania momus), in the Kas Kekova marine

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A female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, taking a ride on a Pyrosome. Photographed during a blackwater dive in 50 feet of water with the bottom 400 feet below. Anilao, Philippines, Pacific Ocean.A female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, taking a ride on a Pyrosome. Photographed during a blackwater dive in 50 feet of water with the bottom 400 feet below. Anilao, Philippines, Pacific Ocean.A female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, taking a ride on a Pyrosome. Photographed during a blackwater dive in 50 feet of water with the bottom 400 feet below. Anilao, Philippines, Pacific Ocean.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2445449

2445449

A female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, taking a ride on a

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Paper Nautilus / Argonauta. Female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, found riding on a Salp during a blackwater drift dive. Palm Beach, Florida, USA, Atlantic Ocean.Paper Nautilus / Argonauta. Female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, found riding on a Salp during a blackwater drift dive. Palm Beach, Florida, USA, Atlantic Ocean.Paper Nautilus / Argonauta. Female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta species, found riding on a Salp during a blackwater drift dive. Palm Beach, Florida, USA, Atlantic Ocean.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2444921

2444921

Paper Nautilus / Argonauta. Female Paper Nautilus, Argonauta

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Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) hidden in a crevice, off Calella de Palafrugel, Costa Brava, Spain.Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) hidden in a crevice, off Calella de Palafrugel, Costa Brava, Spain.Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) hidden in a crevice, off Calella de Palafrugel, Costa Brava, Spain.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2443217

Common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) hidden in a crevice, off

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Hairy shrimp with eggs, Phycocaris species, perched on a tunicate, Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Pacific OceanHairy shrimp with eggs, Phycocaris species, perched on a tunicate, Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Pacific OceanHairy shrimp with eggs, Phycocaris species, perched on a tunicate, Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Pacific Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2437988

Hairy shrimp with eggs, Phycocaris species, perched on a

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snooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia . Bali Sea, Pacific Oceansnooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia . Bali Sea, Pacific Oceansnooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica, guarding its eggs laid on a tunicate, Rhopalaea sp., Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia . Bali Sea, Pacific Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2437986

2437986

snooted Many Host, or Ghost Goby, Pleurosicya mossambica,

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2436869

2436869

a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp while pushing it from the outside like a baby carriage. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp while pushing it from the outside like a baby carriage. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding several babies in a red salp while pushing it from the outside like a baby carriage. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2436865

2436865

a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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Gammarid Amphipods on a Blue Tunicate. Also known as a Ladybug Amphipods. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia, Pacific Ocean.Gammarid Amphipods on a Blue Tunicate. Also known as a Ladybug Amphipods. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia, Pacific Ocean.Gammarid Amphipods on a Blue Tunicate. Also known as a Ladybug Amphipods. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia, Pacific Ocean.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2436861

2436861

Gammarid Amphipods on a Blue Tunicate. Also known as a Ladybug

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. unidentified deep water Tripodfish larva, Ipnopidae family, photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. unidentified deep water Tripodfish larva, Ipnopidae family, photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. unidentified deep water Tripodfish larva, Ipnopidae family, photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
2436851

2436851

a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding the few remaining babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding the few remaining babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding the few remaining babies in a red salp. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2436373

a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceana Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out the inside where it will eventually raise its young. In this case the adult is guarding many babies. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2435814

a Hyperiid amphipod, Phronima, that attacks salps, hollows out

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Thalia dealbata, Koï, Cyprinus carpioThalia dealbata, Koï, Cyprinus carpioThalia dealbata, Koï, Cyprinus carpio© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2424374

Thalia dealbata, Koï, Cyprinus carpio

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Ascidian depths to 70 meters deep, Mayotte.Une colony of ascidians color the penumbra of a red color, once it lit by my lamp.Ascidian depths to 70 meters deep, Mayotte.Une colony of ascidians color the penumbra of a red color, once it lit by my lamp.Ascidian depths to 70 meters deep, Mayotte.Une colony of ascidians color the penumbra of a red color, once it lit by my lamp.© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2417042

Ascidian depths to 70 meters deep, Mayotte.Une colony of

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ANFÍPODO pelagic. It is a species related to the SALPE (lives in its transparent body). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.ANFÍPODO pelagic. It is a species related to the SALPE (lives in its transparent body). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.ANFÍPODO pelagic. It is a species related to the SALPE (lives in its transparent body). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2403892

ANFÍPODO pelagic. It is a species related to the SALPE (lives in

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Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2403891

Salpe, planktonic tunicate. Marine invertebrates of the Canary

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Tunicate (Polycarpa aurata) and Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum) on a coral pinnacle, Bangka Island, IndonesiaTunicate (Polycarpa aurata) and Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum) on a coral pinnacle, Bangka Island, IndonesiaTunicate (Polycarpa aurata) and Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum) on a coral pinnacle, Bangka Island, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2397167

Tunicate (Polycarpa aurata) and Urn ascidian (Atriolum robustum)

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