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Green black-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis moreletii) leaping and leaving its trail. Take a single shot. El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.Green black-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis moreletii) leaping and leaving its trail. Take a single shot. El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.Green black-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis moreletii) leaping and leaving its trail. Take a single shot. El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.© Jorge Figueroa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green black-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis moreletii) leaping and

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Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) ponting during the take off, Quebec, CanadaCanadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) ponting during the take off, Quebec, CanadaCanadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) ponting during the take off, Quebec, Canada© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) ponting during the take off,

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Spot-billed pelican or grey pelican (Pelecanus philippensis), drinking during the flight, take some water in the beak and sometimes the head can be projected backwards under the body, Yala national park, Sri LankaSpot-billed pelican or grey pelican (Pelecanus philippensis), drinking during the flight, take some water in the beak and sometimes the head can be projected backwards under the body, Yala national park, Sri LankaSpot-billed pelican or grey pelican (Pelecanus philippensis), drinking during the flight, take some water in the beak and sometimes the head can be projected backwards under the body, Yala national park, Sri Lanka© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spot-billed pelican or grey pelican (Pelecanus philippensis),

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Lesser Flamingos in flight - Lake Magadi KenyaLesser Flamingos in flight - Lake Magadi KenyaLesser Flamingos in flight - Lake Magadi Kenya© Michel & Christine Denis-Huot / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Lesser Flamingos in flight - Lake Magadi Kenya

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Man photographing an Indian Cobra in the grass ; Photographer: Daniel HeuclinMan photographing an Indian Cobra in the grassMan photographing an Indian Cobra in the grass ; Photographer: Daniel Heuclin© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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Man photographing an Indian Cobra in the grass ; Photographer:

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Chacma baboon grooming a teddy bear - South Africa ; Conflict between man and baboon in urban areas.<br>Baboons manage to go inside the flats looking for food. They take some stuff for play like curtains their favorite and sometime a teddy bear! Strange grooming behaviour with a teddy bear! Chacma baboon grooming a teddy bear - South AfricaChacma baboon grooming a teddy bear - South Africa ; Conflict between man and baboon in urban areas.
Baboons manage to go inside the flats looking for food. They take some stuff for play like curtains their favorite and sometime a teddy bear! Strange grooming behaviour with a teddy bear!
© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Chacma baboon grooming a teddy bear - South Africa ; Conflict

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Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.

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Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Homme sarclant un rang potager, au printemps.

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People strolling on a beach on the Opal Coast, Escalles, Pas de Calais, FrancePeople strolling on a beach on the Opal Coast, Escalles, Pas de Calais, FrancePeople strolling on a beach on the Opal Coast, Escalles, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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People strolling on a beach on the Opal Coast, Escalles, Pas de

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Cape Cormorant (Phalacrocorax capensis), side view of an adult at take-off, Western Cape, South AfricaCape Cormorant (Phalacrocorax capensis), side view of an adult at take-off, Western Cape, South AfricaCape Cormorant (Phalacrocorax capensis), side view of an adult at take-off, Western Cape, South Africa© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cape Cormorant (Phalacrocorax capensis), side view of an adult at

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Path arranged to access the beach of Lourtuais, Brittany, FrancePath arranged to access the beach of Lourtuais, Brittany, FrancePath arranged to access the beach of Lourtuais, Brittany, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Path arranged to access the beach of Lourtuais, Brittany, France

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Woman cutting the main axis of a cherry tree to encourage it to take a more spreading habit. Training pruning in summer (pruning in green).Woman cutting the main axis of a cherry tree to encourage it to take a more spreading habit. Training pruning in summer (pruning in green).Woman cutting the main axis of a cherry tree to encourage it to take a more spreading habit. Training pruning in summer (pruning in green).© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Woman cutting the main axis of a cherry tree to encourage it to

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A Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), sneaks in to take a bite of a carcass while a King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa), feeds. Costa Rica.A Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), sneaks in to take a bite of a carcass while a King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa), feeds. Costa Rica.A Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), sneaks in to take a bite of a carcass while a King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa), feeds. Costa Rica.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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A Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), sneaks in to take a bite of a

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Greenshank (Tringa nebularia), adult at take off, Campania, ItalyGreenshank (Tringa nebularia), adult at take off, Campania, ItalyGreenshank (Tringa nebularia), adult at take off, Campania, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Greenshank (Tringa nebularia), adult at take off, Campania, Italy

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Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) a male bird on a twig on a flowering field. Take in the middle of summer in Stockholm, Sweden.Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) a male bird on a twig on a flowering field. Take in the middle of summer in Stockholm, Sweden.Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) a male bird on a twig on a flowering field. Take in the middle of summer in Stockholm, Sweden.© Ivan Sjögren / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) a male bird on a twig on a

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, BrazilPhoto safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Photo safari on Cuiaba river, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil

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Cutting of the hydrangea to the smothered. Jar placed on a Hydrangea spike (Hydrangea sp) to encourage it to take root in a humid atmosphere.Cutting of the hydrangea to the smothered. Jar placed on a Hydrangea spike (Hydrangea sp) to encourage it to take root in a humid atmosphere.Cutting of the hydrangea to the smothered. Jar placed on a Hydrangea spike (Hydrangea sp) to encourage it to take root in a humid atmosphere.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cutting of the hydrangea to the smothered. Jar placed on a

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Woman walking her dog in the forest of Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine, Ile-de-France, FranceWoman walking her dog in the forest of Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine, Ile-de-France, FranceWoman walking her dog in the forest of Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine, Ile-de-France, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Woman walking her dog in the forest of Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine,

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is

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Take of raspberry rejection. Multiplication of a raspberry tree by pulling off a rejection (sucker)Take of raspberry rejection. Multiplication of a raspberry tree by pulling off a rejection (sucker)Take of raspberry rejection. Multiplication of a raspberry tree by pulling off a rejection (sucker)© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Take of raspberry rejection. Multiplication of a raspberry tree

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Planting a sage step by step: take the plant out of the pot.Planting a sage step by step: take the plant out of the pot.Planting a sage step by step: take the plant out of the pot.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Planting a sage step by step: take the plant out of the pot.

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Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus), side view of an adult at take off, Campania, ItalyGreen Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus), side view of an adult at take off, Campania, ItalyGreen Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus), side view of an adult at take off, Campania, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus), side view of an adult at take

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on

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Golden Bridge, Sun World Ba Na Hills, Danang, Vietnam, AsiaGolden Bridge, Sun World Ba Na Hills, Danang, Vietnam, AsiaGolden Bridge, Sun World Ba Na Hills, Danang, Vietnam, Asia© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Golden Bridge, Sun World Ba Na Hills, Danang, Vietnam, Asia

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Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with

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Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with naturalist photographer. Tenerife, Canary Islands. Photograph taken with the mandatory permits of the MAPAMA.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pilot group. Calderón (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with

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Free diver photographing California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) feeding on sardine's bait ball (Sardinops sagax), Magdalena Bay, West Coast of Baja California, Pacific Ocean, MexicoFree diver photographing California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) feeding on sardine's bait ball (Sardinops sagax), Magdalena Bay, West Coast of Baja California, Pacific Ocean, MexicoFree diver photographing California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus) feeding on sardine's bait ball (Sardinops sagax), Magdalena Bay, West Coast of Baja California, Pacific Ocean, Mexico© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Free diver photographing California Sea Lion (Zalophus

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Spotted Sandgrouse (Pterocles senegallus), smal flock at take-off from a drinking pool, Draâ-Tafilalet, MoroccoSpotted Sandgrouse (Pterocles senegallus), smal flock at take-off from a drinking pool, Draâ-Tafilalet, MoroccoSpotted Sandgrouse (Pterocles senegallus), smal flock at take-off from a drinking pool, Draâ-Tafilalet, Morocco© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spotted Sandgrouse (Pterocles senegallus), smal flock at take-off

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Scopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, ItalyScopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, ItalyScopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an

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Brown-necked Raven (Corvus ruficollis), adult at take-off in a moroccan desert Draâ-Tafilalet, MoroccoBrown-necked Raven (Corvus ruficollis), adult at take-off in a moroccan desert Draâ-Tafilalet, MoroccoBrown-necked Raven (Corvus ruficollis), adult at take-off in a moroccan desert Draâ-Tafilalet, Morocco© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Brown-necked Raven (Corvus ruficollis), adult at take-off in a

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Scopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, ItalyScopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, ItalyScopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an adult taking off from the water, Tuscany, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scopoli's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), side view of an

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Droplets, drop of waters left by a Wood Sandpiper at take off, Campania, ItalyDroplets, drop of waters left by a Wood Sandpiper at take off, Campania, ItalyDroplets, drop of waters left by a Wood Sandpiper at take off, Campania, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Droplets, drop of waters left by a Wood Sandpiper at take off,

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Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola), adult at take off, Campania, ItalyWood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola), adult at take off, Campania, ItalyWood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola), adult at take off, Campania, Italy© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola), adult at take off, Campania,

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Walker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, FranceWalker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, FranceWalker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, France© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Walker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest),

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Walker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, FranceWalker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, FranceWalker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest), Regional Natural Park of Vosges du Nord, France© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Walker in the snowy Vosges forest (pine-beech-fir forest),

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton

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