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Search result Snakelocks Sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata)

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Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2464389

Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of

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Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2462502

Snakelocks anemones (Anemonia sulcata). Marine invertebrates of

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Marbled rock crab looking to get rid of Anemone FranceMarbled rock crab looking to get rid of Anemone FranceMarbled rock crab looking to get rid of Anemone France© Eric Polidori / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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1777774

Marbled rock crab looking to get rid of Anemone France

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Sea anemone Sardinia Tyrrhenian SeaSea anemone Sardinia Tyrrhenian SeaSea anemone Sardinia Tyrrhenian Sea© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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1258602

Sea anemone Sardinia Tyrrhenian Sea

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Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the  Cnidaire. Here Copepod is catched by a tentacle (dark part of the picture).Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentaclesAnemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the Cnidaire. Here Copepod is catched by a tentacle (dark part of the picture).© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123329

Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires

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Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the  Cnidaire. Here Copepod is catched by a tentacle (dark part of the picture), the microscopic filaments are invisible on this scale.Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentaclesAnemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the Cnidaire. Here Copepod is catched by a tentacle (dark part of the picture), the microscopic filaments are invisible on this scale.© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
123327

123327

Anemone catching a copepod with one of its tentacles ; Cnidaires

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Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the  Cnidaire. Here a Copepod of the zooplancton and two Radiolarian are catched by a tentacle (on the dark part of the picture).Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarianAnemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the Cnidaire. Here a Copepod of the zooplancton and two Radiolarian are catched by a tentacle (on the dark part of the picture).© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123323

Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed

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Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.<br>@ Filament.<br>As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the longest filaments is 0,4 millimeter.Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemoneDischarge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@ Filament.
As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the longest filaments is 0,4 millimeter.
© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123317

Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@

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Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.<br>@ Filament.<br>As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the filaments is 0,6 millimeter.Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemoneDischarge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@ Filament.
As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the filaments is 0,6 millimeter.
© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123314

Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@

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Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.<br>@ Filament.<br>As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the filaments ranges between 0,5 and 0,8 millimetre.Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemoneDischarge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@ Filament.
As soon as there is contact, the cnidocils start the opening of the nematocysts which project the armed filaments towards the target in contact. This partial sight shows only one small part of the filaments. The length of the filaments ranges between 0,5 and 0,8 millimetre.
© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123313

Discharge of cnidocysts by a sea anemone ; @ Cnidocyst.
@

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Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the  Cnidaire. Here a Copepod of the zooplancton and two Radiolarian are catched by a tentacle (on the dark part of the picture).Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarianAnemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed themselves by capturing small animals which pass near their tentacles. Those are covered with irritant capsules (Nematocysts) which kill almost instantaneously any individual who makes the error to pass very close to them or touch them, that is to say while swimming or by moving the waves. The projected microscopic filaments maintain the preys, then the tentacle deposit them in the mouth of the Cnidaire. Here a Copepod of the zooplancton and two Radiolarian are catched by a tentacle (on the dark part of the picture).© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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123310

Anemone catching a copepod and two radiolarian ; Cnidaires feed

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Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1467296

Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1467295

1467295

Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaSnakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1467118

Snakelocks Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Opolet Anemone, Susac Island, Adriatic Sea, CroatiaOpolet Anemone, Susac Island, Adriatic Sea, CroatiaOpolet Anemone, Susac Island, Adriatic Sea, Croatia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746438

Opolet Anemone, Susac Island, Adriatic Sea, Croatia

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Opolet Anemone, Port-Cros Island, Hyeres, Cote d'Azur, FranceOpolet Anemone, Port-Cros Island, Hyeres, Cote d'Azur, FranceOpolet Anemone, Port-Cros Island, Hyeres, Cote d'Azur, France© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746410

Opolet Anemone, Port-Cros Island, Hyeres, Cote d'Azur, France

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Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746373

746373

Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746372

746372

Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, SloveniaColony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746371

746371

Colony of Opolet Anemone, Piran, Adriatic Sea, Slovenia

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Opolet Anemone at Coral Reef, Maun Island, Adriatic Sea, CroatiaOpolet Anemone at Coral Reef, Maun Island, Adriatic Sea, CroatiaOpolet Anemone at Coral Reef, Maun Island, Adriatic Sea, Croatia© Borut Furlan / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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746287

746287

Opolet Anemone at Coral Reef, Maun Island, Adriatic Sea, Croatia

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Opelet Anemone, Marettimo, Aegadian Islands, Sicily, Mediterranean Sea, ItalyOpelet Anemone, Marettimo, Aegadian Islands, Sicily, Mediterranean Sea, ItalyOpelet Anemone, Marettimo, Aegadian Islands, Sicily, Mediterranean Sea, Italy© Franco Banfi / WaterFrame - Agence / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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745704

745704

Opelet Anemone, Marettimo, Aegadian Islands, Sicily,

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