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The critically endangered Indri indri photographed in the Mitsinjo natural reserve. This wild individual was feed by leaves to a scientist that was monitoring this group. Madagascar Finalist at Montier en der et à Namur festival 2018.The critically endangered Indri indri photographed in the Mitsinjo natural reserve. This wild individual was feed by leaves to a scientist that was monitoring this group. Madagascar Finalist at Montier en der et à Namur festival 2018.The critically endangered Indri indri photographed in the Mitsinjo natural reserve. This wild individual was feed by leaves to a scientist that was monitoring this group. Madagascar Finalist at Montier en der et à Namur festival 2018.© Quentin Martinez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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The critically endangered Indri indri photographed in the

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This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.© Quentin Martinez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed

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volcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunionvolcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunionvolcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunion© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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volcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification MissionScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base FloridaScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification Mission© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris

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Dark fruit-eating bat (Artibeus obscurus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruDark fruit-eating bat (Artibeus obscurus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruDark fruit-eating bat (Artibeus obscurus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, Peru© Ignacio Yufera / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Dark fruit-eating bat (Artibeus obscurus), held by researcher,

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Greater fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruGreater fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruGreater fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, Peru© Ignacio Yufera / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Greater fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), held by

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Lesser spear-nosed bat (Phyllostomus elongatus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruLesser spear-nosed bat (Phyllostomus elongatus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruLesser spear-nosed bat (Phyllostomus elongatus), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, Peru© Ignacio Yufera / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Lesser spear-nosed bat (Phyllostomus elongatus), held by

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White-throated round-eared bat (Lophostoma silvicolum), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruWhite-throated round-eared bat (Lophostoma silvicolum), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, PeruWhite-throated round-eared bat (Lophostoma silvicolum), held by researcher, Madre de Dios, Peru© Ignacio Yufera / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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White-throated round-eared bat (Lophostoma silvicolum), held by

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Dwarf gecko (Lepidoblepharis emberawoundule), adult male in the hand of Dr Abel Batista, who described it to Science in 2014. Guna Yala, Panama, February.Dwarf gecko (Lepidoblepharis emberawoundule), adult male in the hand of Dr Abel Batista, who described it to Science in 2014. Guna Yala, Panama, February.Dwarf gecko (Lepidoblepharis emberawoundule), adult male in the hand of Dr Abel Batista, who described it to Science in 2014. Guna Yala, Panama, February.© Ignacio Yufera / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Dwarf gecko (Lepidoblepharis emberawoundule), adult male in the

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Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.© Andy Murch / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research,

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Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research, Bimini Shark Lab, South Bimini Island, Caribbean Sea.© Andy Murch / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Bull Shark, Carcharius leucas, shark tagging, shark research,

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Kayak for naturalist observation on the Loire between La Charité and Cosne sur Loire, Loire Valley, FranceKayak for naturalist observation on the Loire between La Charité and Cosne sur Loire, Loire Valley, FranceKayak for naturalist observation on the Loire between La Charité and Cosne sur Loire, Loire Valley, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

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Kayak for naturalist observation on the Loire between La Charité

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Hawksbill Sea Turtle hatchlings on their way into the sea, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaHawksbill Sea Turtle hatchlings on their way into the sea, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaHawksbill Sea Turtle hatchlings on their way into the sea, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Hawksbill Sea Turtle hatchlings on their way into the sea,

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Sea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaSea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaSea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New

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Eggs inside Sea turtle nest, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaEggs inside Sea turtle nest, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaEggs inside Sea turtle nest, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Eggs inside Sea turtle nest, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland,

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Marine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Marine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus

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Marine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Marine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus

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Marine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Marine biologists measuring a young Spiny lobster (Palinurus

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Marine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, FranceMarine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus elephas), in the Marine Protected Area of the Agathoise Coast, Roc de Brescou Marine Reserve, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Marine biologist marking a young common spiny lobster (Palinurus

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, AntarcticaWeddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, AntarcticaWeddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack

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"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base,

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Study of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaStudy of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaStudy of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Study of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of

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Unloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville

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Snowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, AntarcticaSnowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, AntarcticaSnowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Snowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, Antarctica

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Every Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaEvery Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaEvery Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Every Saturday, the population of the base participates in the

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Ornithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaOrnithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaOrnithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Ornithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie

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The winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaThe winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaThe winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally,

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally,

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Bust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, AntarcticaBust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, AntarcticaBust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric

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The two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticThe two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticThe two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, Antarctic© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on

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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui Island© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University

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How to hold a kiwi for beak measuring, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli)How to hold a kiwi for beak measuring, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli)How to hold a kiwi for beak measuring, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli)© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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How to hold a kiwi for beak measuring, Research programm of

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinator© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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