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Goeldi's Monkey (Callimico goeldii) observing a brown bumblebee (Bombus pascuorum) in a cage in the Menagerie Zoo of the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris, FranceGoeldi's Monkey (Callimico goeldii) observing a brown bumblebee (Bombus pascuorum) in a cage in the Menagerie Zoo of the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris, FranceGoeldi's Monkey (Callimico goeldii) observing a brown bumblebee (Bombus pascuorum) in a cage in the Menagerie Zoo of the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris, France© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Goeldi's Monkey (Callimico goeldii) observing a brown bumblebee

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White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with

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To try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. FranceTo try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. FranceTo try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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To try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the

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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of

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Apidologie - Bees in a flight tunnel. This procedure was used to show that the evaluation of distance by bees proceeds from their visual system. And through the white and black stripes, its has been shown that it also depends on the landscape's structure. This experiment was carried out by then calculating the length of the bees's dance in relation to the food source of which the distance was identified. /Apidologie - Bees in a flight tunnel. This procedure was used to show that the evaluation of distance by bees proceeds from their visual system. And through the white and black stripes, its has been shown that it also depends on the landscape's structure. This experiment was carried out by then calculating the length of the bees's dance in relation to the food source of which the distance was identified. /Apidologie - Bees in a flight tunnel. This procedure was used to show that the evaluation of distance by bees proceeds from their visual system. And through the white and black stripes, its has been shown that it also depends on the landscape's structure. This experiment was carried out by then calculating the length of the bees's dance in relation to the food source of which the distance was identified. /© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Apidologie - Bees in a flight tunnel. This procedure was used to

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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers

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volcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunionvolcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunionvolcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano eruption 16 of september 2016, Reunion© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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volcanologist on Piton de la Fournaise in activity, Volcano

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, China© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base,

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Caribbean flamingo on a nest with chick. Cuba.Caribbean flamingo on a nest with chick. Cuba.Caribbean flamingo on a nest with chick. Cuba.© Andrey Gudkov / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Caribbean flamingo on a nest with chick. Cuba.

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Two Komodo Dragons are fighting each other. Very rare picture.Two Komodo Dragons are fighting each other. Very rare picture.Two Komodo Dragons are fighting each other. Very rare picture.© Andrey Gudkov / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Two Komodo Dragons are fighting each other. Very rare picture.

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West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification MissionScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base FloridaScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification Mission© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris

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Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright background, magnification x 40. Colors by computer processing.Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright background, magnification x 40. Colors by computer processing.© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright

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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light 

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Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa 

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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil © Bruno Pambour / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil 

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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil © Bruno Pambour / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil 

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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil © Bruno Pambour / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Jaguar yawning Encontros das Aguas Pantanal Brazil 

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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscopeSpicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in

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Rose Chafer with the wings spread in collectionRose Chafer with the wings spread in collectionRose Chafer with the wings spread in collection© Tristan Da Cunha / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Rose Chafer with the wings spread in collection

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), two years, China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, AsiaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), two years, China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, AsiaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), two years, China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, Asia© GTW / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Use for calendar prohibited in France 31-12-2022
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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), two years, China

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Orange Ladybird or Orange Ladybug (Halyzia sedecimguttata), in flightOrange Ladybird or Orange Ladybug (Halyzia sedecimguttata), in flightOrange Ladybird or Orange Ladybug (Halyzia sedecimguttata), in flight© André Skonieczny / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Orange Ladybird or Orange Ladybug (Halyzia sedecimguttata), in

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Several bone carving of a sperm whale, dolphins and sailing boats. Lajes do Pico, Pico island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic ocean.Several bone carving of a sperm whale, dolphins and sailing boats. Lajes do Pico, Pico island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic ocean.Several bone carving of a sperm whale, dolphins and sailing boats. Lajes do Pico, Pico island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic ocean.© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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Several bone carving of a sperm whale, dolphins and sailing

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Erika Diaz Hernandez, part of the team of surveillance, controls the monitors installed in the enclosures and collects data. Centro de Cría del Lince Ibérico El Acebuche, Donana National Park, Andalusia, Spain.Erika Diaz Hernandez, part of the team of surveillance, controls the monitors installed in the enclosures and collects data. Centro de Cría del Lince Ibérico El Acebuche, Donana National Park, Andalusia, Spain.Erika Diaz Hernandez, part of the team of surveillance, controls the monitors installed in the enclosures and collects data. Centro de Cría del Lince Ibérico El Acebuche, Donana National Park, Andalusia, Spain.© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Erika Diaz Hernandez, part of the team of surveillance, controls

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Cutting of earthwormCutting of earthwormCutting of earthworm© Jean-Claude Louchet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Cutting of earthworm

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Cutting of Ivy petioleCutting of Ivy petioleCutting of Ivy petiole© Jean-Claude Louchet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Cutting of Ivy petiole

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Hydrangea (Hydrangea sp) petal on black backgroundHydrangea (Hydrangea sp) petal on black backgroundHydrangea (Hydrangea sp) petal on black background© Jean-Claude Louchet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Hydrangea (Hydrangea sp) petal on black background

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Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.© Antoine Lorgnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin

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Young Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Young Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Young Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.© Antoine Lorgnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Young Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles

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Feeding the Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Feeding the Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Feeding the Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.© Antoine Lorgnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Feeding the Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) at the Charles

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Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin research center. Puerto Ayora. Island Santa Cruz. Galapagos archipelago. Ecuador.© Antoine Lorgnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp) eating at the Charles Darwin

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Harvested tomatoes. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Harvested tomatoes. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Harvested tomatoes. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy (white pipes) and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Bananas and other tropical plants. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy (white pipes) and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Bananas and other tropical plants. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy (white pipes) and are used to do research on the growth of plants under icelandic conditions.Bananas and other tropical plants. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2512211

Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses of a university in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter months the greenhouses are illuminated. In the background steam from geothermal springs. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter months the greenhouses are illuminated. In the background steam from geothermal springs. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter months the greenhouses are illuminated. In the background steam from geothermal springs. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2512210

Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2512209

Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2512208

Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in

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Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, marchHothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in Hveragerdi in winter. They are heated by geothermal energy and supply a large part of the icelandic demand of vegetables like tomatoes and bell peppers. Crop growing is done all year round, during the dark winter month the greenhouses are illuminated. europe, northern europe, iceland, march© Martin Zwick / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2512207

Hothouses in Hveragerdi, Iceland. Hothouses, greenhouses in

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Feathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede Alipes sp. Togo MilkingFeathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede Alipes sp. Togo MilkingFeathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede Alipes sp. Togo Milking© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2511481

Feathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail

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Feathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede (Alipes sp) Milking, TogoFeathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede (Alipes sp) Milking, TogoFeathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail centipede (Alipes sp) Milking, Togo© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2511480

Feathertail centipede, Flagtail centipede , Cameroon flag tail

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Section of an beachgrass' leaf. A dye was used to show the structure of the leaf. Magnification of 27 on a 24x36Section of an beachgrass' leaf. A dye was used to show the structure of the leaf. Magnification of 27 on a 24x36Section of an beachgrass' leaf. A dye was used to show the structure of the leaf. Magnification of 27 on a 24x36© Jean-Claude Louchet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2511413

Section of an beachgrass' leaf. A dye was used to show the

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Cross-section of a Wheat leaf. Dyes were used to distinguish the different parts of the leaf. Magnification of 20 in 24x36Cross-section of a Wheat leaf. Dyes were used to distinguish the different parts of the leaf. Magnification of 20 in 24x36Cross-section of a Wheat leaf. Dyes were used to distinguish the different parts of the leaf. Magnification of 20 in 24x36© Jean-Claude Louchet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2511412

Cross-section of a Wheat leaf. Dyes were used to distinguish the

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A. Apple mummy left on the twig (2021), B. Twospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) on the stalk of the mummy (macrography) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, FranceA. Apple mummy left on the twig (2021), B. Twospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) on the stalk of the mummy (macrography) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, FranceA. Apple mummy left on the twig (2021), B. Twospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) on the stalk of the mummy (macrography) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, France© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2510524

A. Apple mummy left on the twig (2021), B. Twospotted Spider Mite

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Apple mummy left on the twig, Mites are not visible at this scale. (2021) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, FranceApple mummy left on the twig, Mites are not visible at this scale. (2021) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, FranceApple mummy left on the twig, Mites are not visible at this scale. (2021) on 04.04.2022, Banyuls sur mer, Pyrénées-Orientales, France© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2510523

Apple mummy left on the twig, Mites are not visible at this

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Twospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) in motion on an appleTwospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) in motion on an appleTwospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) in motion on an apple© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2510518

Twospotted Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae) in motion on an apple

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