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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Pictures of the artisanal manufacture of the traps which however requires a few tools, including an 80w soldering iron, a bottle piercing tool that makes holes with claws that hold the tubes of centrifuges with a diameter of 10.5 mm. All this for a cost of 0.4 cents per bottle-trap, plus an attractant to put in the bottles. Fearsome efficiency for the catches.Pictures of the artisanal manufacture of the traps which however requires a few tools, including an 80w soldering iron, a bottle piercing tool that makes holes with claws that hold the tubes of centrifuges with a diameter of 10.5 mm. All this for a cost of 0.4 cents per bottle-trap, plus an attractant to put in the bottles. Fearsome efficiency for the catches.Pictures of the artisanal manufacture of the traps which however requires a few tools, including an 80w soldering iron, a bottle piercing tool that makes holes with claws that hold the tubes of centrifuges with a diameter of 10.5 mm. All this for a cost of 0.4 cents per bottle-trap, plus an attractant to put in the bottles. Fearsome efficiency for the catches.© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Pictures of the artisanal manufacture of the traps which however

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Cultivation in Petri box of a piece of nut contaminated by Xanthomonas arboricolaen. Whitish colonies on agar; in the insert Microphotography of Xanthomonas arboricola bacteria five days later. Gr. X 300 -Cultivation in Petri box of a piece of nut contaminated by Xanthomonas arboricolaen. Whitish colonies on agar; in the insert Microphotography of Xanthomonas arboricola bacteria five days later. Gr. X 300 -Cultivation in Petri box of a piece of nut contaminated by Xanthomonas arboricolaen. Whitish colonies on agar; in the insert Microphotography of Xanthomonas arboricola bacteria five days later. Gr. X 300 -© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Cultivation in Petri box of a piece of nut contaminated by

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Image of the 200 Rhagoletis flies counted in a trap bottle (185 in the field, nearly 200 in total) Bottles hung in a walnut tree. Isère, France, September 3, 2019Image of the 200 Rhagoletis flies counted in a trap bottle (185 in the field, nearly 200 in total) Bottles hung in a walnut tree. Isère, France, September 3, 2019Image of the 200 Rhagoletis flies counted in a trap bottle (185 in the field, nearly 200 in total) Bottles hung in a walnut tree. Isère, France, September 3, 2019© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Image of the 200 Rhagoletis flies counted in a trap bottle (185

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Fight against Lepidoptera: depending on the dates of capture, different species are caught by these trap-bottles including Plodia interpunctella and Cydia pomonella which parasitize nuts and apples. These traps operate night and day for four to five months during the summer. Model designed by the author.Fight against Lepidoptera: depending on the dates of capture, different species are caught by these trap-bottles including Plodia interpunctella and Cydia pomonella which parasitize nuts and apples. These traps operate night and day for four to five months during the summer. Model designed by the author.Fight against Lepidoptera: depending on the dates of capture, different species are caught by these trap-bottles including Plodia interpunctella and Cydia pomonella which parasitize nuts and apples. These traps operate night and day for four to five months during the summer. Model designed by the author.© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Fight against Lepidoptera: depending on the dates of capture,

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Electric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, FranceElectric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, FranceElectric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, France© Jean-François Noblet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Electric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel

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Electric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, FranceElectric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, FranceElectric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel Régional de Chartreuse, Alpes, France© Jean-François Noblet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Electric fishing on the Guiers, labeled wild river, Parc Naturel

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Various means of control: adhesive plates with attractive pheromones for Lepidopeters with many Plodia interpunctella individuals captured. Pheromone bioprox bioprox - Cybele agrocareVarious means of control: adhesive plates with attractive pheromones for Lepidopeters with many Plodia interpunctella individuals captured. Pheromone bioprox bioprox - Cybele agrocareVarious means of control: adhesive plates with attractive pheromones for Lepidopeters with many Plodia interpunctella individuals captured. Pheromone bioprox bioprox - Cybele agrocare© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Various means of control: adhesive plates with attractive

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Black mold (Aspergillus niger) sporangia under development on agar in petri dish. April 8, 2019 -Black mold (Aspergillus niger) sporangia under development on agar in petri dish. April 8, 2019 -Black mold (Aspergillus niger) sporangia under development on agar in petri dish. April 8, 2019 -© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Black mold (Aspergillus niger) sporangia under development on

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Two systems for catching flies: commercial trap on the left, artisanal trap on the right that catches more insects than the other.Two systems for catching flies: commercial trap on the left, artisanal trap on the right that catches more insects than the other.Two systems for catching flies: commercial trap on the left, artisanal trap on the right that catches more insects than the other.© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Two systems for catching flies: commercial trap on the left,

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Yellow adhesive plate to capture Rhagoletis flies. The screen prevents insectivorous birds from sticking to it. Isère, France, 2019Yellow adhesive plate to capture Rhagoletis flies. The screen prevents insectivorous birds from sticking to it. Isère, France, 2019Yellow adhesive plate to capture Rhagoletis flies. The screen prevents insectivorous birds from sticking to it. Isère, France, 2019© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Yellow adhesive plate to capture Rhagoletis flies. The screen

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Bouteille piège installée à Varacieux sous un noyer avec les mouches Rhagoletis capturées, Isère, France. le 12.09.2019Bouteille piège installée à Varacieux sous un noyer avec les mouches Rhagoletis capturées, Isère, France. le 12.09.2019Bouteille piège installée à Varacieux sous un noyer avec les mouches Rhagoletis capturées, Isère, France. le 12.09.2019© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Bouteille piège installée à Varacieux sous un noyer avec les mo

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Various flies including flies Rhagoletis completa captured in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)Various flies including flies Rhagoletis completa captured in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)Various flies including flies Rhagoletis completa captured in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Various flies including flies Rhagoletis completa captured in a

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About 180 flies of Rhagoletis completa caught in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)About 180 flies of Rhagoletis completa caught in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)About 180 flies of Rhagoletis completa caught in a trap bottle. The 11.9.2018 - (Varacieux Isère, France)© Jean Lecomte / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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About 180 flies of Rhagoletis completa caught in a trap bottle.

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Scuba diver in front of an acoustic recorder installed for the study of the frequency and impact of acoustic diving, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, FranceScuba diver in front of an acoustic recorder installed for the study of the frequency and impact of acoustic diving, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, FranceScuba diver in front of an acoustic recorder installed for the study of the frequency and impact of acoustic diving, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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Scuba diver in front of an acoustic recorder installed for the

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Installation of an acoustic recorder for the study of the frequentation and impact of acoustic diving, in the Natural Marine Reserve of Cerbère-Banyuls, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, FranceInstallation of an acoustic recorder for the study of the frequentation and impact of acoustic diving, in the Natural Marine Reserve of Cerbère-Banyuls, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, FranceInstallation of an acoustic recorder for the study of the frequentation and impact of acoustic diving, in the Natural Marine Reserve of Cerbère-Banyuls, Pyrénées-Orientales, Occitania, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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Installation of an acoustic recorder for the study of the

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Herbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, FranceHerbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, FranceHerbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, France© Lamontagne / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Herbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture,

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Herbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, FranceHerbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, FranceHerbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture, constitution, realization, France© Lamontagne / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Herbarium, observation, composition, protection, manufacture,

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Beekeeper looking for the queen using a magnifying glass. Buckfast Bees, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, FranceBeekeeper looking for the queen using a magnifying glass. Buckfast Bees, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, FranceBeekeeper looking for the queen using a magnifying glass. Buckfast Bees, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, France© Georges Lopez / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Beekeeper looking for the queen using a magnifying glass.

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Sea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaSea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New GuineaSea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sea Turtle Conservation program, Eretmochelys imbricata, New

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Runway collapsed following permafross thaw, Polychrome Pass, Denali NP, AlaskaRunway collapsed following permafross thaw, Polychrome Pass, Denali NP, AlaskaRunway collapsed following permafross thaw, Polychrome Pass, Denali NP, Alaska© Robert Valarcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Runway collapsed following permafross thaw, Polychrome Pass,

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Scuba diver marine biologist mapping a Posidonia herbarium using acoustic telemetry. Site of Aresquiers, off Frontignan, Hérault, Occitanie, France.Scuba diver marine biologist mapping a Posidonia herbarium using acoustic telemetry. Site of Aresquiers, off Frontignan, Hérault, Occitanie, France.Scuba diver marine biologist mapping a Posidonia herbarium using acoustic telemetry. Site of Aresquiers, off Frontignan, Hérault, Occitanie, France.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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Scuba diver marine biologist mapping a Posidonia herbarium using

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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric

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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui Island© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinator© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State University© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b Tara© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples

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