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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103518

Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103464

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers

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Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright background, magnification x 40. Colors by computer processing.Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright background, magnification x 40. Colors by computer processing.© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Transversal cut of a spine of sea urchin  ; Lighting in bright

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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light 

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Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Microscopic view of moss branch Tortula papillosa 

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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscopeSpicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Bubble site 3D model preview  9°49'25" S 150°49'2" E, Bubble site, Normanby Island, Papua New Guinea, preview of animated photogrammetry model, Bubble Reef. This is a punctual record of a volcanic seeps site that is being investigated by several scientific missions. The scaled, georeferenced 3Dmodel is of millimetric resolution, it covers about 1000 m2 and includes the transect area of 600 m2 which has been investigated by the Tara team in 2017.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Bubble site 3D model preview  9°49'25" S 150°49'2" E, Bubble site, Normanby Island, Papua New Guinea, preview of animated photogrammetry model, Bubble Reef. This is a punctual record of a volcanic seeps site that is being investigated by several scientific missions. The scaled, georeferenced 3Dmodel is of millimetric resolution, it covers about 1000 m2 and includes the transect area of 600 m2 which has been investigated by the Tara team in 2017.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Bubble site 3D model preview  9°49'25" S 150°49'2" E, Bubble site, Normanby Island, Papua New Guinea, preview of animated photogrammetry model, Bubble Reef. This is a punctual record of a volcanic seeps site that is being investigated by several scientific missions. The scaled, georeferenced 3Dmodel is of millimetric resolution, it covers about 1000 m2 and includes the transect area of 600 m2 which has been investigated by the Tara team in 2017.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Bubble site 3D model

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405130

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405129

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405128

Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio

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Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405127

Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio

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Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405126

Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them by a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the sugar distributors. It is thus possible to monitor the bee's activities on an individual level, such as the hours they leave the hive.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them by a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the sugar distributors. It is thus possible to monitor the bee's activities on an individual level, such as the hours they leave the hive.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them by a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the sugar distributors. It is thus possible to monitor the bee's activities on an individual level, such as the hours they leave the hive.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103568

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The microchips are used by

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Head of a bee with its proboscis, its tongue taken with a photographic technique of focus stacking. We can see, from top to bottom: an ocellus, the compound eyes, the antennas, the mandibles and the tongue. The ocelli are set in a triangle on the top of the head of a worker bee. The worker bee's compound eyes have 5000 facets. The antennas are composed of a flagellum (divided into 10 segments in the worker bee), a pedicle and a scape. The mandibles permit the bees to knead and shape the wax and propolis, fight, clean the hive and care for their queen or their brood. The tongue, called the proboscis, is a complex organ made up of many parts.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Head of a bee with its proboscis, its tongue taken with a photographic technique of focus stacking. We can see, from top to bottom: an ocellus, the compound eyes, the antennas, the mandibles and the tongue. The ocelli are set in a triangle on the top of the head of a worker bee. The worker bee's compound eyes have 5000 facets. The antennas are composed of a flagellum (divided into 10 segments in the worker bee), a pedicle and a scape. The mandibles permit the bees to knead and shape the wax and propolis, fight, clean the hive and care for their queen or their brood. The tongue, called the proboscis, is a complex organ made up of many parts.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Head of a bee with its proboscis, its tongue taken with a photographic technique of focus stacking. We can see, from top to bottom: an ocellus, the compound eyes, the antennas, the mandibles and the tongue. The ocelli are set in a triangle on the top of the head of a worker bee. The worker bee's compound eyes have 5000 facets. The antennas are composed of a flagellum (divided into 10 segments in the worker bee), a pedicle and a scape. The mandibles permit the bees to knead and shape the wax and propolis, fight, clean the hive and care for their queen or their brood. The tongue, called the proboscis, is a complex organ made up of many parts.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103549

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Head of a bee with its proboscis,

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Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103526

Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of

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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, FranceApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, FranceApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103519

Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows

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Apidologie - Bee's eye magnified X 270: In the electron microscope, the enlarged and coloured eye of a bee (Apis mellifera).Apidologie - Bee's eye magnified X 270: In the electron microscope, the enlarged and coloured eye of a bee (Apis mellifera).Apidologie - Bee's eye magnified X 270: In the electron microscope, the enlarged and coloured eye of a bee (Apis mellifera).© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Apidologie - Bee's eye magnified X 270: In the electron

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Seahorse Hypocampus sp. X-ray. PortugalSeahorse Hypocampus sp. X-ray. PortugalSeahorse Hypocampus sp. X-ray. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Seahorse Hypocampus sp. X-ray. Portugal

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Common polypodyCommon polypodyCommon polypody© Georges Lopez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Common polypody

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Commo, polypodyCommo, polypodyCommo, polypody© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Commo, polypody

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Sunday sawfly ovipositor ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 40Sunday sawfly ovipositorSunday sawfly ovipositor ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 40© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Sunday sawfly ovipositor ; Polarized light illumination

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Rabbit flee on white background  ; Brightfield illumination, x 20Rabbit flee on white background Rabbit flee on white background ; Brightfield illumination, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Rabbit flee on white background ; Brightfield illumination, x 20

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Radiolarians on pink background  ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 50Radiolarians on pink background Radiolarians on pink background ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Radiolarians on pink background ; Polarized light illumination

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Knotted thread hydroid on black background  ; Darkfield illumination, x 50Knotted thread hydroid on black background Knotted thread hydroid on black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Knotted thread hydroid on black background ; Darkfield

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Cross the spine of hen feather on black background  ; Darkfield illumination, x 50Cross the spine of hen feather on black background Cross the spine of hen feather on black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cross the spine of hen feather on black background ; Darkfield

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Copper sulphate crystals in polarized light ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 100Copper sulphate crystals in polarized lightCopper sulphate crystals in polarized light ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Copper sulphate crystals in polarized light ; Polarized light

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Cross section of a human incisor  ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate cellophane x 50Cross section of a human incisor Cross section of a human incisor ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate cellophane x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cross section of a human incisor ; Polarized light illumination

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Scale Sole gray background  ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 50Scale Sole gray background Scale Sole gray background ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scale Sole gray background ; Polarized light illumination

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Pork Tapeworm scolex  ; Light polarized light with gypsum compensating plate, x 100Pork Tapeworm scolex Pork Tapeworm scolex ; Light polarized light with gypsum compensating plate, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pork Tapeworm scolex ; Light polarized light with gypsum

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Oyster spat on a black background  ; Darkfield illumination, x 50Oyster spat on a black background Oyster spat on a black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Oyster spat on a black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 50

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Scale GoldFish on black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 20Scale GoldFish on black backgroundScale GoldFish on black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scale GoldFish on black background ; Darkfield illumination, x 20

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Scale GoldFish on blue background ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 20Scale GoldFish on blue backgroundScale GoldFish on blue background ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scale GoldFish on blue background ; Polarized light illumination

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Radula of Round-mouthed Snail on black background  ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum x 100 Radula of Round-mouthed Snail on black background Radula of Round-mouthed Snail on black background ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate gypsum x 100 © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Radula of Round-mouthed Snail on black background ; Polarized

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Cross section of Sea Lamprey  ; Brightfield illumination, x 20Cross section of Sea Lamprey Cross section of Sea Lamprey ; Brightfield illumination, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cross section of Sea Lamprey ; Brightfield illumination, x 20

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Cross section of cat tongue tinted injected  ; Darkfield illumination, x 100Cross section of cat tongue tinted injected Cross section of cat tongue tinted injected ; Darkfield illumination, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Cross section of cat tongue tinted injected ; Darkfield

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Section of rabbit caecum  ; Darkfield illumination, x 100Section of rabbit caecum Section of rabbit caecum ; Darkfield illumination, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Section of rabbit caecum ; Darkfield illumination, x 100

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Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion  ; Light polarized light, x 100Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion ; Light polarized light, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781922

Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion ; Light polarized light, x 100

RMRight Managed

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Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion  ; Light polarized light, x 100Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion ; Light polarized light, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781921

Pedipalp Pseudo-Scorpion ; Light polarized light, x 100

RMRight Managed

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Prostigmata Cheyletoidea male mite  ; Light polarized light, x 100Prostigmata Cheyletoidea male mite Prostigmata Cheyletoidea male mite ; Light polarized light, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781920

Prostigmata Cheyletoidea male mite ; Light polarized light, x 100

RMRight Managed

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Female mite Chicken on blue background  ; Light polarized light, x 100Female mite Chicken on blue background Female mite Chicken on blue background ; Light polarized light, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781919

Female mite Chicken on blue background ; Light polarized light,

RMRight Managed

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Chick embryo 48 hours  ; Oblique illumination in brightfield, x 20Chick embryo 48 hours Chick embryo 48 hours ; Oblique illumination in brightfield, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781918

Chick embryo 48 hours ; Oblique illumination in brightfield, x 20

RMRight Managed

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Microscopic view of Deutzia Hair ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 160Microscopic view of Deutzia HairMicroscopic view of Deutzia Hair ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 160© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781917

Microscopic view of Deutzia Hair ; Polarized light illumination

RMRight Managed

JPG

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Male fern sporangia  ; Light polarized light, x 20Male fern sporangia Male fern sporangia ; Light polarized light, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781916

Male fern sporangia ; Light polarized light, x 20

RMRight Managed

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Male fern sporangia  ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate cellophane x 50Male fern sporangia Male fern sporangia ; Polarized light illumination compensator plate cellophane x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781915

Male fern sporangia ; Polarized light illumination compensator

RMRight Managed

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Longitudinal section of peristome of Ergot of rye ; Darkfield illumination polarization x 50Longitudinal section of peristome of Ergot of ryeLongitudinal section of peristome of Ergot of rye ; Darkfield illumination polarization x 50© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781914

Longitudinal section of peristome of Ergot of rye ; Darkfield

RMRight Managed

JPG

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Capsule Polytrichum  ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 20Capsule Polytrichum Capsule Polytrichum ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781901

Capsule Polytrichum ; Polarized light illumination compensator

RMRight Managed

JPG

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Cross section of Smotthleaf Elm bud  ; Light polarized light, x 100Cross section of Smotthleaf Elm bud Cross section of Smotthleaf Elm bud ; Light polarized light, x 100© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781900

Cross section of Smotthleaf Elm bud ; Light polarized light, x

RMRight Managed

JPG

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Cross section on Royal Fern ; Brightfield illumination, x 20Cross section on Royal FernCross section on Royal Fern ; Brightfield illumination, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781899

Cross section on Royal Fern ; Brightfield illumination, x 20

RMRight Managed

JPG

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Cross section of rod of Apple tree ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 20Cross section of rod of Apple treeCross section of rod of Apple tree ; Polarized light illumination compensator Bereck, x 20© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1781898

Cross section of rod of Apple tree ; Polarized light illumination

RMRight Managed

JPG

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