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Red lionfish - Asia ; Rascasse volanteRed lionfish - AsiaRed lionfish - Asia ; Rascasse volante© Gérard Lacz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1953946

Red lionfish - Asia ; Rascasse volante

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Pacific sea nettle Jellyfishes floating in water CaliforniaPacific sea nettle Jellyfishes floating in water CaliforniaPacific sea nettle Jellyfishes floating in water California© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

997184

Pacific sea nettle Jellyfishes floating in water California

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Broadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetusBroadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetusBroadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetus© Claude Guihard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

923830

Broadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetus

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Giant clams (Tridacna sp.) in aquariumGiant clams (Tridacna sp.) in aquariumGiant clams (Tridacna sp.) in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424378

Giant clams (Tridacna sp.) in aquarium

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Coral propagation, Marine aquarium, Cap d'Agde, FranceCoral propagation, Marine aquarium, Cap d'Agde, FranceCoral propagation, Marine aquarium, Cap d'Agde, France© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424278

Coral propagation, Marine aquarium, Cap d'Agde, France

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Mini-reef marine aquariumMini-reef marine aquariumMini-reef marine aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424241

Mini-reef marine aquarium

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Marine aquariumMarine aquariumMarine aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424240

Marine aquarium

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Mini-reef marine aquariumMini-reef marine aquariumMini-reef marine aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424239

Mini-reef marine aquarium

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Ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris), group in aquariumOcellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris), group in aquariumOcellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris), group in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424227

Ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris), group in aquarium

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408019

Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408007

Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above

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European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407998

European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407997

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407996

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407995

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407994

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Girl watching a fish, Aquarium of Noumea. New Caledonia.Girl watching a fish, Aquarium of Noumea. New Caledonia.Girl watching a fish, Aquarium of Noumea. New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2400891

Girl watching a fish, Aquarium of Noumea. New Caledonia.

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Geography cone or Geographer cone, Conus geographus, eating a blenny. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all. Several human deaths have been attributed to this species of snail. Is a carnivorous species, and uses a radula (like a microscopic harpoon) to inject a conotoxin to kill its prey. The proboscis, the tip of which holds the harpoon-like radular tooth, is capable of being extended to any part of its own shell. The living animal is a risk to any person handling it who has not taken proper care to protect exposed skin. Aquarium photographyGeography cone or Geographer cone, Conus geographus, eating a blenny. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all. Several human deaths have been attributed to this species of snail. Is a carnivorous species, and uses a radula (like a microscopic harpoon) to inject a conotoxin to kill its prey. The proboscis, the tip of which holds the harpoon-like radular tooth, is capable of being extended to any part of its own shell. The living animal is a risk to any person handling it who has not taken proper care to protect exposed skin. Aquarium photographyGeography cone or Geographer cone, Conus geographus, eating a blenny. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all. Several human deaths have been attributed to this species of snail. Is a carnivorous species, and uses a radula (like a microscopic harpoon) to inject a conotoxin to kill its prey. The proboscis, the tip of which holds the harpoon-like radular tooth, is capable of being extended to any part of its own shell. The living animal is a risk to any person handling it who has not taken proper care to protect exposed skin. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393057

Geography cone or Geographer cone, Conus geographus, eating a

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Warasebo (Odontamblyopus lacepedii), Kyushu Island, Japan, marketed fish, to be eaten once dried. This long-lived fish lives in the mud. His head, and especially his strong teeth, earned him the nickname "alien" in reference to the creature of the science fiction film.Warasebo (Odontamblyopus lacepedii), Kyushu Island, Japan, marketed fish, to be eaten once dried. This long-lived fish lives in the mud. His head, and especially his strong teeth, earned him the nickname "alien" in reference to the creature of the science fiction film.Warasebo (Odontamblyopus lacepedii), Kyushu Island, Japan, marketed fish, to be eaten once dried. This long-lived fish lives in the mud. His head, and especially his strong teeth, earned him the nickname "alien" in reference to the creature of the science fiction film.© Rémi Masson / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2172429

Warasebo (Odontamblyopus lacepedii), Kyushu Island, Japan,

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Copperband butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus. Composite image. Portugal.. Composite imageCopperband butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus. Composite image. Portugal.. Composite imageCopperband butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus. Composite image. Portugal.. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168009

Copperband butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus. Composite image.

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Blind goby, Typhlogobius californiensis. Inside burrow with Ghost shrimp, Thalianassa affinis. This goby lives commensally with this shrimp that makes their burrows on the sand. The burrows are entirely constructed by the shrimp the that also keep it in good opening conditions. The constant flow oh water produced by the paddles on the underside of the shrimp transports microscopic preys and other organic detritus that are used as food for the shrimp and the host goby. The goby helps to repel invasions of the burrow from other burrowing animals. Photographed in aquarium inside sand burrow. California, USA.Blind goby, Typhlogobius californiensis. Inside burrow with Ghost shrimp, Thalianassa affinis. This goby lives commensally with this shrimp that makes their burrows on the sand. The burrows are entirely constructed by the shrimp the that also keep it in good opening conditions. The constant flow oh water produced by the paddles on the underside of the shrimp transports microscopic preys and other organic detritus that are used as food for the shrimp and the host goby. The goby helps to repel invasions of the burrow from other burrowing animals. Photographed in aquarium inside sand burrow. California, USA.Blind goby, Typhlogobius californiensis. Inside burrow with Ghost shrimp, Thalianassa affinis. This goby lives commensally with this shrimp that makes their burrows on the sand. The burrows are entirely constructed by the shrimp the that also keep it in good opening conditions. The constant flow oh water produced by the paddles on the underside of the shrimp transports microscopic preys and other organic detritus that are used as food for the shrimp and the host goby. The goby helps to repel invasions of the burrow from other burrowing animals. Photographed in aquarium inside sand burrow. California, USA.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168007

Blind goby, Typhlogobius californiensis. Inside burrow with Ghost

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Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102644

Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA

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One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102643

One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island

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Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) maleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) maleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) male© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094414

Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) male

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Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) maleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) maleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) male© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094412

Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) male

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Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) femaleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) femaleTwostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) female© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094398

Twostripe lyretail (Aphyosemion bivittatum) female

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Wedge-tail triggerfish; Rhinecanthus rectangulus. Aquarium. PortugalWedge-tail triggerfish; Rhinecanthus rectangulus. Aquarium. PortugalWedge-tail triggerfish; Rhinecanthus rectangulus. Aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2077341

Wedge-tail triggerfish; Rhinecanthus rectangulus. Aquarium.

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Smooth trunkfish, Rhinesomus triqueter, Juvenile. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageSmooth trunkfish, Rhinesomus triqueter, Juvenile. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageSmooth trunkfish, Rhinesomus triqueter, Juvenile. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2077306

Smooth trunkfish, Rhinesomus triqueter, Juvenile. Composite

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Portrait of Yellow Blackspotted Puffer (Arothron nigropunctatus citrinellus)Portrait of Yellow Blackspotted Puffer (Arothron nigropunctatus citrinellus)Portrait of Yellow Blackspotted Puffer (Arothron nigropunctatus citrinellus)© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2071544

Portrait of Yellow Blackspotted Puffer (Arothron nigropunctatus

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Horned Nerite Snail (Clithon corona) in aquarium, Poindimié, New CaledoniaHorned Nerite Snail (Clithon corona) in aquarium, Poindimié, New CaledoniaHorned Nerite Snail (Clithon corona) in aquarium, Poindimié, New Caledonia© David Massemin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2069273

Horned Nerite Snail (Clithon corona) in aquarium, Poindimié, New

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National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2047230

National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark

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National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2047229

National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark

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National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen DenmarkNational Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2047228

National Aquarium Denmark Den Ba Planet - Copenhagen Denmark

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