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Sign, fishing is prohibited, port of San Pedro de Pinatar, Mar Menor, La Manga, Murcia, Spain, EuropeSign, fishing is prohibited, port of San Pedro de Pinatar, Mar Menor, La Manga, Murcia, Spain, EuropeSign, fishing is prohibited, port of San Pedro de Pinatar, Mar Menor, La Manga, Murcia, Spain, Europe© Barbara Boensch / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sign, fishing is prohibited, port of San Pedro de Pinatar, Mar

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Juvenile Emperor Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator), Ghost Bay dive site, Amed, Karangasem Regency, Bali, Indonesia, Indian OceanJuvenile Emperor Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator), Ghost Bay dive site, Amed, Karangasem Regency, Bali, Indonesia, Indian OceanJuvenile Emperor Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator), Ghost Bay dive site, Amed, Karangasem Regency, Bali, Indonesia, Indian Ocean© Colin Marshall / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Juvenile Emperor Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator), Ghost Bay

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Pfeffer's Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) embryo in egg, Puri Jati dive site, Seririt, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaPfeffer's Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) embryo in egg, Puri Jati dive site, Seririt, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaPfeffer's Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) embryo in egg, Puri Jati dive site, Seririt, Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia© Colin Marshall / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Pfeffer's Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) embryo in

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Catamarans at Pointe du Grouin, Emerald Coast, Brittany, FranceCatamarans at Pointe du Grouin, Emerald Coast, Brittany, FranceCatamarans at Pointe du Grouin, Emerald Coast, Brittany, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Catamarans at Pointe du Grouin, Emerald Coast, Brittany, France

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Artist's concept of the dwarf planet Ceres. In this image the artist is suggesting that Ceres, like all small bodies in the Solar System, is a rather sterile, lunar-like world pockmarked with thousands of impact craters. Sprouting from the lower left limb are hypothesized water geysers. . . The dwarf planet Ceres lies in the main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt and contains about a third of the belt's total mass. Ceres is massive enough that, unlike its asteroid neighbors, gravity can pull it into a spherical shape. Dubbed a planet when it was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century, Ceres was subsequently considered an asteroid until 2006 when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet.
Artist's concept of the dwarf planet Ceres. In this image the artist is suggesting that Ceres, like all small bodies in the Solar System, is a rather sterile, lunar-like world pockmarked with thousands of impact craters. Sprouting from the lower left limb are hypothesized water geysers. . . The dwarf planet Ceres lies in the main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt and contains about a third of the belt's total mass. Ceres is massive enough that, unlike its asteroid neighbors, gravity can pull it into a spherical shape. Dubbed a planet when it was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century, Ceres was subsequently considered an asteroid until 2006 when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet. Artist's concept of the dwarf planet Ceres. In this image the artist is suggesting that Ceres, like all small bodies in the Solar System, is a rather sterile, lunar-like world pockmarked with thousands of impact craters. Sprouting from the lower left limb are hypothesized water geysers. . . The dwarf planet Ceres lies in the main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt and contains about a third of the belt's total mass. Ceres is massive enough that, unlike its asteroid neighbors, gravity can pull it into a spherical shape. Dubbed a planet when it was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century, Ceres was subsequently considered an asteroid until 2006 when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of the dwarf planet Ceres. In this image the

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Artist's concept illustrating the gravity assist maneuver used by spacecraft through the solar system. 
Artist's concept illustrating the gravity assist maneuver used by spacecraft through the solar system. Artist's concept illustrating the gravity assist maneuver used by spacecraft through the solar system. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept illustrating the gravity assist maneuver used by

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Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their

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Artist's concept showing how Uranus might look from a position in space several hundred thousand miles above its south pole. . Uranus is a gas giant composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gases surrounding a relatively small, dense core of molten rock and metal. Its bluish color is due to the presence of methane in its upper atmosphere. . Uranus also has a ring system. However, Uranus' rings are over three orders of magnitude dimmer than Saturn's; where Saturn's rings are nearly white, Uranus' rings are more like the color of charcoal. . . One bizarre aspect of Uranus is that its axis of rotation is tipped beyond 90 degrees in relation to the plane of its orbit around the Sun. This puts Uranus' north and south poles, relative to the Sun, where the other planets have their equators.Artist's concept showing how Uranus might look from a position in space several hundred thousand miles above its south pole. . Uranus is a gas giant composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gases surrounding a relatively small, dense core of molten rock and metal. Its bluish color is due to the presence of methane in its upper atmosphere. . Uranus also has a ring system. However, Uranus' rings are over three orders of magnitude dimmer than Saturn's; where Saturn's rings are nearly white, Uranus' rings are more like the color of charcoal. . . One bizarre aspect of Uranus is that its axis of rotation is tipped beyond 90 degrees in relation to the plane of its orbit around the Sun. This puts Uranus' north and south poles, relative to the Sun, where the other planets have their equators.Artist's concept showing how Uranus might look from a position in space several hundred thousand miles above its south pole. . Uranus is a gas giant composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gases surrounding a relatively small, dense core of molten rock and metal. Its bluish color is due to the presence of methane in its upper atmosphere. . Uranus also has a ring system. However, Uranus' rings are over three orders of magnitude dimmer than Saturn's; where Saturn's rings are nearly white, Uranus' rings are more like the color of charcoal. . . One bizarre aspect of Uranus is that its axis of rotation is tipped beyond 90 degrees in relation to the plane of its orbit around the Sun. This puts Uranus' north and south poles, relative to the Sun, where the other planets have their equators.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept showing how Uranus might look from a position in

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Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in orbit around Puck. Puck in turn orbits Uranus at a height of 37 thousand miles above Uranus' cloud tops, completing one orbit in about 18 hours. Due to the fact that Puck's orbit is on the same plane as Uranus' rings, they would appear as little more than a thin line from this vantage point.Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in orbit around Puck. Puck in turn orbits Uranus at a height of 37 thousand miles above Uranus' cloud tops, completing one orbit in about 18 hours. Due to the fact that Puck's orbit is on the same plane as Uranus' rings, they would appear as little more than a thin line from this vantage point.Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in orbit around Puck. Puck in turn orbits Uranus at a height of 37 thousand miles above Uranus' cloud tops, completing one orbit in about 18 hours. Due to the fact that Puck's orbit is on the same plane as Uranus' rings, they would appear as little more than a thin line from this vantage point.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might

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Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in space about a thousand miles above and beyond Puck itself. With a diameter of about 100 miles, Puck is the largest and outermost of the ten known inner satellites that orbit Uranus within a radius of 51 thousand miles. . Further in toward Uranus on the right is Belinda, a moon that is about 40 miles in diameter. Even closer to Uranus on the far left is the 60-mile-diameter satellite Portia. On Uranus itself can be seen a giant, cyclonic storm that's nearly as big as the Earth. During the past few years the Hubble Space Telescope has observed storms in Uranus' southern hemisphere, but the structure and an nature of these storms is unknown.Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in space about a thousand miles above and beyond Puck itself. With a diameter of about 100 miles, Puck is the largest and outermost of the ten known inner satellites that orbit Uranus within a radius of 51 thousand miles. . Further in toward Uranus on the right is Belinda, a moon that is about 40 miles in diameter. Even closer to Uranus on the far left is the 60-mile-diameter satellite Portia. On Uranus itself can be seen a giant, cyclonic storm that's nearly as big as the Earth. During the past few years the Hubble Space Telescope has observed storms in Uranus' southern hemisphere, but the structure and an nature of these storms is unknown.Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might look from a position in space about a thousand miles above and beyond Puck itself. With a diameter of about 100 miles, Puck is the largest and outermost of the ten known inner satellites that orbit Uranus within a radius of 51 thousand miles. . Further in toward Uranus on the right is Belinda, a moon that is about 40 miles in diameter. Even closer to Uranus on the far left is the 60-mile-diameter satellite Portia. On Uranus itself can be seen a giant, cyclonic storm that's nearly as big as the Earth. During the past few years the Hubble Space Telescope has observed storms in Uranus' southern hemisphere, but the structure and an nature of these storms is unknown.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how Uranus and its tiny satellite Puck might

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Artist's concept showing Uranus (left) and Earth (right) to scale. Uranus is four times the diameter of Earth. Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun, Earth is the third.Artist's concept showing Uranus (left) and Earth (right) to scale. Uranus is four times the diameter of Earth. Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun, Earth is the third.Artist's concept showing Uranus (left) and Earth (right) to scale. Uranus is four times the diameter of Earth. Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun, Earth is the third.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept showing Uranus (left) and Earth (right) to

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Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to

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Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one

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Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to

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A full Mars. In this image the massive volcano Olympus Mons is clearly visible upper left of center, while at center are the three Tharsis Montes volcanoes. All these volcanoes are believed to be extinct. To the right of the Tharsis Montes are the deep canyons of Valles Marineris, a meandering network of channels as long as the United States is wide. . Mars has been known historically as a bright, reddish star in Earth's sky. The ruddy hue is due to the presence of iron oxide (i.e., rust) on the martian surface. Mars is often host to white clouds of water-ice crystals (like the high-altitude cirrus clouds on Earth) and experiences seasonal dust storms that can cover the entire planet.A full Mars. In this image the massive volcano Olympus Mons is clearly visible upper left of center, while at center are the three Tharsis Montes volcanoes. All these volcanoes are believed to be extinct. To the right of the Tharsis Montes are the deep canyons of Valles Marineris, a meandering network of channels as long as the United States is wide. . Mars has been known historically as a bright, reddish star in Earth's sky. The ruddy hue is due to the presence of iron oxide (i.e., rust) on the martian surface. Mars is often host to white clouds of water-ice crystals (like the high-altitude cirrus clouds on Earth) and experiences seasonal dust storms that can cover the entire planet.A full Mars. In this image the massive volcano Olympus Mons is clearly visible upper left of center, while at center are the three Tharsis Montes volcanoes. All these volcanoes are believed to be extinct. To the right of the Tharsis Montes are the deep canyons of Valles Marineris, a meandering network of channels as long as the United States is wide. . Mars has been known historically as a bright, reddish star in Earth's sky. The ruddy hue is due to the presence of iron oxide (i.e., rust) on the martian surface. Mars is often host to white clouds of water-ice crystals (like the high-altitude cirrus clouds on Earth) and experiences seasonal dust storms that can cover the entire planet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A full Mars. In this image the massive volcano Olympus Mons is

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Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the

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Artist's concept of how Jupiter might look from a position in space just beneath the plane of Jupiter's Main ring. Jupiter's Main ring is believed to be composed of dust and debris from meteoroid impacts with Jupiter's tiny innermost satellites Metis and Adrastea. Jupiter hosts two other broader and more diffuse rings (too faint to be rendered here) which are believed to be generated and replenished by meteoroid impacts on the tiny satellites Thebe and Amalthea.Artist's concept of how Jupiter might look from a position in space just beneath the plane of Jupiter's Main ring. Jupiter's Main ring is believed to be composed of dust and debris from meteoroid impacts with Jupiter's tiny innermost satellites Metis and Adrastea. Jupiter hosts two other broader and more diffuse rings (too faint to be rendered here) which are believed to be generated and replenished by meteoroid impacts on the tiny satellites Thebe and Amalthea.Artist's concept of how Jupiter might look from a position in space just beneath the plane of Jupiter's Main ring. Jupiter's Main ring is believed to be composed of dust and debris from meteoroid impacts with Jupiter's tiny innermost satellites Metis and Adrastea. Jupiter hosts two other broader and more diffuse rings (too faint to be rendered here) which are believed to be generated and replenished by meteoroid impacts on the tiny satellites Thebe and Amalthea.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how Jupiter might look from a position in

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Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter

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Illustration comparing the size of extrasolar planet Gliese 581 c (right) with that of the Earth (left). Gliese 581 c is believed to be about five times more massive than the Earth with a diameter about half-again as large as Earth's. Depending upon the planet's composition, whether mostly rock or a combination of rock and water, a visitor would experience a surface gravity between 1.25 to 2.2 times the Earth's. Gliese 581 c is about 20 light years away from Earth.Illustration comparing the size of extrasolar planet Gliese 581 c (right) with that of the Earth (left). Gliese 581 c is believed to be about five times more massive than the Earth with a diameter about half-again as large as Earth's. Depending upon the planet's composition, whether mostly rock or a combination of rock and water, a visitor would experience a surface gravity between 1.25 to 2.2 times the Earth's. Gliese 581 c is about 20 light years away from Earth.Illustration comparing the size of extrasolar planet Gliese 581 c (right) with that of the Earth (left). Gliese 581 c is believed to be about five times more massive than the Earth with a diameter about half-again as large as Earth's. Depending upon the planet's composition, whether mostly rock or a combination of rock and water, a visitor would experience a surface gravity between 1.25 to 2.2 times the Earth's. Gliese 581 c is about 20 light years away from Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Illustration comparing the size of extrasolar planet Gliese 581 c

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Illustration of a rocky and variegated extrasolar planet, Gliese 581 c. Gliese 581 c is a super-earth extrasolar planet orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581. I's been called a super-earth because it is one of the few known extrasolar planets that has a mass near Earth's, and the only one to occupy its sun's habitable zone.
Illustration of a rocky and variegated extrasolar planet, Gliese 581 c. Gliese 581 c is a super-earth extrasolar planet orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581. I's been called a super-earth because it is one of the few known extrasolar planets that has a mass near Earth's, and the only one to occupy its sun's habitable zone. Illustration of a rocky and variegated extrasolar planet, Gliese 581 c. Gliese 581 c is a super-earth extrasolar planet orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581. I's been called a super-earth because it is one of the few known extrasolar planets that has a mass near Earth's, and the only one to occupy its sun's habitable zone. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Illustration of a rocky and variegated extrasolar planet, Gliese

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Artist's concept of how the brown dwarf Gliese 229 b might appear from a distance of about a half million miles. Glowing like a charcoal ember, Gliese 229 b was discovered in 1995 and is 19 light years from the Earth. This brown dwarf orbits the red dwarf Gliese 229A in the constellation Lepus. Gliese 229A can be seen shining dimly on the upper left. These two dwarfs are about four billion miles apart, about the same distance between Pluto and our sun. . Gliese 229 b is believed to be 30 to 40 times more massive than the planet Jupiter, which is massive enough for Gliese 229 b to sustain deuterium fusion, but not enough mass to initiate hydrogen fusion like our Sun. As a result, Gliese 229 b radiates a temperature of only 1,300º F. It is believed to be two to four billion years old. . . Despite being so much more massive than the planet Jupiter, the diameter of this brown dwarf is believed to be actually slightly less than Jupiter's; Gliese 229 b's greater mass results in its overcoming the internal pressures that sustain Jupiter's greater volume.Artist's concept of how the brown dwarf Gliese 229 b might appear from a distance of about a half million miles. Glowing like a charcoal ember, Gliese 229 b was discovered in 1995 and is 19 light years from the Earth. This brown dwarf orbits the red dwarf Gliese 229A in the constellation Lepus. Gliese 229A can be seen shining dimly on the upper left. These two dwarfs are about four billion miles apart, about the same distance between Pluto and our sun. . Gliese 229 b is believed to be 30 to 40 times more massive than the planet Jupiter, which is massive enough for Gliese 229 b to sustain deuterium fusion, but not enough mass to initiate hydrogen fusion like our Sun. As a result, Gliese 229 b radiates a temperature of only 1,300º F. It is believed to be two to four billion years old. . . Despite being so much more massive than the planet Jupiter, the diameter of this brown dwarf is believed to be actually slightly less than Jupiter's; Gliese 229 b's greater mass results in its overcoming the internal pressures that sustain Jupiter's greater volume.Artist's concept of how the brown dwarf Gliese 229 b might appear from a distance of about a half million miles. Glowing like a charcoal ember, Gliese 229 b was discovered in 1995 and is 19 light years from the Earth. This brown dwarf orbits the red dwarf Gliese 229A in the constellation Lepus. Gliese 229A can be seen shining dimly on the upper left. These two dwarfs are about four billion miles apart, about the same distance between Pluto and our sun. . Gliese 229 b is believed to be 30 to 40 times more massive than the planet Jupiter, which is massive enough for Gliese 229 b to sustain deuterium fusion, but not enough mass to initiate hydrogen fusion like our Sun. As a result, Gliese 229 b radiates a temperature of only 1,300º F. It is believed to be two to four billion years old. . . Despite being so much more massive than the planet Jupiter, the diameter of this brown dwarf is believed to be actually slightly less than Jupiter's; Gliese 229 b's greater mass results in its overcoming the internal pressures that sustain Jupiter's greater volume.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how the brown dwarf Gliese 229 b might appear

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Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago.
Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago. Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out

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This image suggests how an extraterrestrial civilization on an earth-like planet might reveal itself via artificial light sources, in this case brightly lit cities that follow the contours of the ocean coasts. Perhaps some day there will be a telescope powerful enough to resolve such evidence for extrasolar intelligence.This image suggests how an extraterrestrial civilization on an earth-like planet might reveal itself via artificial light sources, in this case brightly lit cities that follow the contours of the ocean coasts. Perhaps some day there will be a telescope powerful enough to resolve such evidence for extrasolar intelligence.This image suggests how an extraterrestrial civilization on an earth-like planet might reveal itself via artificial light sources, in this case brightly lit cities that follow the contours of the ocean coasts. Perhaps some day there will be a telescope powerful enough to resolve such evidence for extrasolar intelligence.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484461

2484461

This image suggests how an extraterrestrial civilization on an

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Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484459

2484459

Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites,

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A young Earth is shrouded in turbulent, roiling clouds, while under the shadow of its night side can be seen flashes of lightning and the ruddy glow of volcanoes and lava fields illuminating the clouds from beneath. The space around the Earth is highlighted by remnants of the nebula from which the Solar System was born. On the upper right is the Earth's Moon whose lava-filled scars from massive impacts are still cooling. . 500 million years after its molten birth the Earth's surface would have cooled enough for a solid crust to form, and gases delivered by comets and emissions from within would have contributed to the Earth's first, albeit primitive, atmosphere.A young Earth is shrouded in turbulent, roiling clouds, while under the shadow of its night side can be seen flashes of lightning and the ruddy glow of volcanoes and lava fields illuminating the clouds from beneath. The space around the Earth is highlighted by remnants of the nebula from which the Solar System was born. On the upper right is the Earth's Moon whose lava-filled scars from massive impacts are still cooling. . 500 million years after its molten birth the Earth's surface would have cooled enough for a solid crust to form, and gases delivered by comets and emissions from within would have contributed to the Earth's first, albeit primitive, atmosphere.A young Earth is shrouded in turbulent, roiling clouds, while under the shadow of its night side can be seen flashes of lightning and the ruddy glow of volcanoes and lava fields illuminating the clouds from beneath. The space around the Earth is highlighted by remnants of the nebula from which the Solar System was born. On the upper right is the Earth's Moon whose lava-filled scars from massive impacts are still cooling. . 500 million years after its molten birth the Earth's surface would have cooled enough for a solid crust to form, and gases delivered by comets and emissions from within would have contributed to the Earth's first, albeit primitive, atmosphere.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484457

2484457

A young Earth is shrouded in turbulent, roiling clouds, while

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The perspective in this image is looking down on the Indian Ocean from an altitude of 25,000 miles. On the Earth's night side artificial lights clearly define the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, and almost the entire African continent, while clouds obscure some of Europe and India. The alignment with the Moon and Sun is such that at this moment a total eclipse of the Sun is visible revealing the Sun's brilliant corona. However the area of totality, i.e., the darkest part of the Moon's shadow, is so small, less than 200 miles wide, that observers on the Earth would not be able to see this total eclipse. The only portion of the eclipse visible from the Earth is in the eastern Indian Ocean where the Moon's penumbra (partial shadow) falls, as can be seen in this image. . The fact that total solar eclipses are visible at all is due in part to one of the most amazing coincidences in the Solar System: the Sun and the Moon appear from Earth to be about the same size in the sky. This is because the Sun's diameter is both 400 times that of the Moon's and is about 400 times as far away from the Earth. The result is that from the Earth, the Moon appears to just barely cover the Sun. If the Moon's diameter were reduced by just 6%, or if it were a little further away, it would never be large enough to ever completely cover the Sun.The perspective in this image is looking down on the Indian Ocean from an altitude of 25,000 miles. On the Earth's night side artificial lights clearly define the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, and almost the entire African continent, while clouds obscure some of Europe and India. The alignment with the Moon and Sun is such that at this moment a total eclipse of the Sun is visible revealing the Sun's brilliant corona. However the area of totality, i.e., the darkest part of the Moon's shadow, is so small, less than 200 miles wide, that observers on the Earth would not be able to see this total eclipse. The only portion of the eclipse visible from the Earth is in the eastern Indian Ocean where the Moon's penumbra (partial shadow) falls, as can be seen in this image. . The fact that total solar eclipses are visible at all is due in part to one of the most amazing coincidences in the Solar System: the Sun and the Moon appear from Earth to be about the same size in the sky. This is because the Sun's diameter is both 400 times that of the Moon's and is about 400 times as far away from the Earth. The result is that from the Earth, the Moon appears to just barely cover the Sun. If the Moon's diameter were reduced by just 6%, or if it were a little further away, it would never be large enough to ever completely cover the Sun.The perspective in this image is looking down on the Indian Ocean from an altitude of 25,000 miles. On the Earth's night side artificial lights clearly define the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, and almost the entire African continent, while clouds obscure some of Europe and India. The alignment with the Moon and Sun is such that at this moment a total eclipse of the Sun is visible revealing the Sun's brilliant corona. However the area of totality, i.e., the darkest part of the Moon's shadow, is so small, less than 200 miles wide, that observers on the Earth would not be able to see this total eclipse. The only portion of the eclipse visible from the Earth is in the eastern Indian Ocean where the Moon's penumbra (partial shadow) falls, as can be seen in this image. . The fact that total solar eclipses are visible at all is due in part to one of the most amazing coincidences in the Solar System: the Sun and the Moon appear from Earth to be about the same size in the sky. This is because the Sun's diameter is both 400 times that of the Moon's and is about 400 times as far away from the Earth. The result is that from the Earth, the Moon appears to just barely cover the Sun. If the Moon's diameter were reduced by just 6%, or if it were a little further away, it would never be large enough to ever completely cover the Sun.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484455

2484455

The perspective in this image is looking down on the Indian Ocean

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In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484452

2484452

In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres,

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Stylized Earth globe, North America view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.Stylized Earth globe, North America view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.Stylized Earth globe, North America view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484427

2484427

Stylized Earth globe, North America view with grey continents and

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Stylized Earth globe, Americas view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.Stylized Earth globe, Americas view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.Stylized Earth globe, Americas view with grey continents and transparent seas to reveal continents on the other side.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484426

2484426

Stylized Earth globe, Americas view with grey continents and

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484407

2484407

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484406

2484406

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484405

2484405

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, with clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, with clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, with clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484404

2484404

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484403

2484403

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484402

2484402

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484401

2484401

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484400

2484400

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa and Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa and Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa and Europe.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484399

2484399

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484398

2484398

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Asia.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484397

2484397

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America and South America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America and South America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America and South America.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484396

2484396

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484395

2484395

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on South America, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484394

2484394

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Pacific Ocean, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484393

2484393

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Oceania, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484392

2484392

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484391

2484391

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe, Africa and Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe, Africa and Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Europe, Africa and Asia.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484390

2484390

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484389

2484389

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Atlantic Ocean, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484388

2484388

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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JPG

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa, Asia and Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa, Asia and Europe.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on Africa, Asia and Europe.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484387

2484387

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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