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2436 pictures found

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081736

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base, Sichuan, China© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for calendar cover in France prohibited 31-12-2019

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca),captive, Chengdu Panda Base,

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Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand  ; Elephant Nature ParkAsian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030655

Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand ; Elephant

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Young Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature ParkYoung Asian Elephant in vegetation - ThailandYoung Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030654

Young Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature

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Young Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature ParkYoung Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - ThailandYoung Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030652

Young Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature

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Roti Island snake-necked turtles on white background ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'Roti Island snake-necked turtles on white backgroundRoti Island snake-necked turtles on white background ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

2016815

Roti Island snake-necked turtles on white background ; Park

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Young Red-footed Tortoise on white background ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'Young Red-footed Tortoise on white backgroundYoung Red-footed Tortoise on white background ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

2011159

Young Red-footed Tortoise on white background ; Park Turtles 'A

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Portrait of young Hilaire's Side-nacked Turtle in water ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'Portrait of young Hilaire's Side-nacked Turtle in waterPortrait of young Hilaire's Side-nacked Turtle in water ; Park Turtles 'A Cupulatta'© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

2011146

Portrait of young Hilaire's Side-nacked Turtle in water ; Park

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Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh Wildlife Rehabilitation CenterBorneo orangutan hanging from a brance - MalaysiaBorneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh Wildlife Rehabilitation Center© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh

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Young Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth and leaf - Costa Rica ; Aviarios Sloth SanctuaryYoung Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth and leaf - Costa RicaYoung Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth and leaf - Costa Rica ; Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1920220

Young Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth and leaf - Costa Rica ;

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Young Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloths - Costa Rica ; Aviarios Sloth SanctuaryYoung Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloths - Costa RicaYoung Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloths - Costa Rica ; Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1920219

Young Orphan Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloths - Costa Rica ; Aviarios

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Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica FranceHatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

1876462

Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park

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Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica FranceHatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

1876461

Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park

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Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica FranceHatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park Turtles "A Cupulatta"© Claude Thouvenin / BiosphotoJPG - RMOrganization's name mandatory

1876459

Hatching African Spurred Tortoise on sand Corsica France ; Park

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Great Bustards looking for food in a meadow in autumn GBGreat Bustards looking for food in a meadow in autumn GBGreat Bustards looking for food in a meadow in autumn GB© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1836989

Great Bustards looking for food in a meadow in autumn GB

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Portrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor KenyaPortrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor KenyaPortrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor Kenya© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1621872

Portrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor Kenya

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Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; 5 years old orphan gorilla involved in a reintroduction project, PPG, managed by Aspinall Foundation. Reintroduction of an autonomous gorilla population in National Parc of Plateau Bateke.Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in GabonPortrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; 5 years old orphan gorilla involved in a reintroduction project, PPG, managed by Aspinall Foundation. Reintroduction of an autonomous gorilla population in National Parc of Plateau Bateke.© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1614289

Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; 5 years

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Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; Gorillon 5-year project PPG (Protection For Gorillas) Aspinall Foundation.Animals for reintroduction into the NP Batéké.Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in GabonPortrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; Gorillon 5-year project PPG (Protection For Gorillas) Aspinall Foundation.Animals for reintroduction into the NP Batéké.© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1614276

Portrait of a young Western lowland gorilla in Gabon ; Gorillon

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Portrait of a Young Western lowland gorilla Gabon ; Gorillon 5-year project PPG (Protection For Gorillas) Aspinall Foundation.Animals for reintroduction into the NP Batéké.Portrait of a Young Western lowland gorilla GabonPortrait of a Young Western lowland gorilla Gabon ; Gorillon 5-year project PPG (Protection For Gorillas) Aspinall Foundation.Animals for reintroduction into the NP Batéké.© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1614265

Portrait of a Young Western lowland gorilla Gabon ; Gorillon

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Rothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue KenyaRothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue KenyaRothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue Kenya© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1370455

Rothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue Kenya

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Orangutans eating termites during flood season BorneoOrangutans eating termites during flood season BorneoOrangutans eating termites during flood season Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1132560

Orangutans eating termites during flood season Borneo

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Orangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island BorneoOrangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island BorneoOrangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1128303

Orangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island Borneo

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Southern Bornean Orangutan eating termites BorneoSouthern Bornean Orangutan eating termites BorneoSouthern Bornean Orangutan eating termites Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1128299

Southern Bornean Orangutan eating termites Borneo

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Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female rhino's habituation to humans could put her at risk.  Eventually she was transferred to a 10 hectares Sanctuary of rainforest where she could be better protected and possibly reproduce.<br>World population is below 400 individuals in 2006.<br>Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest SumatraFemale Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female rhino's habituation to humans could put her at risk. Eventually she was transferred to a 10 hectares Sanctuary of rainforest where she could be better protected and possibly reproduce.
World population is below 400 individuals in 2006.
© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Use for exhibitions prohibited

483783

Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female

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Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female rhino's habituation to humans could put her at risk.  Eventually she was transferred to a 10 hectares Sanctuary of rainforest where she could be better protected and possibly reproduce.<br>World population is below 400 individuals in 2006.<br>Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest SumatraFemale Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female rhino's habituation to humans could put her at risk. Eventually she was transferred to a 10 hectares Sanctuary of rainforest where she could be better protected and possibly reproduce.
World population is below 400 individuals in 2006.
© Cyril Ruoso / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Use for exhibitions prohibited

483770

Female Sumatran Rhinoceros in rainforest Sumatra ; This female

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New-born Green Sea Turtles in a breeding farm Mexico ; Province of Yucatan.<br>Right before the releasing in the seaNew-born Green Sea Turtles in a breeding farm MexicoNew-born Green Sea Turtles in a breeding farm Mexico ; Province of Yucatan.
Right before the releasing in the sea
© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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New-born Green Sea Turtles in a breeding farm Mexico ; Province

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Picardie Nature transport box for seal rescues on the ground at the Pointe du Hourdel beach. Baie de Somme, Picardie, FrancePicardie Nature transport box for seal rescues on the ground at the Pointe du Hourdel beach. Baie de Somme, Picardie, FrancePicardie Nature transport box for seal rescues on the ground at the Pointe du Hourdel beach. Baie de Somme, Picardie, France© Monique Morin / BiosphotoJPG - RMProhibited use to pet shops and from the trade of animals
Use for the promotion of pesticides, or of all other substance destroying environment prohibited
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited
Prohibited use from meat or any animal products advertising
Prohibited use from fishing advertising

2423188

Picardie Nature transport box for seal rescues on the ground at

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Red-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamRed-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamRed-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420434

Red-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued

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Red-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamRed-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamRed-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420433

Red-shanked douc langur Pygathrix nemaeus Infant that was rescued

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Grey-shanked douc langur Pygathrix cinerea Infant escued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamGrey-shanked douc langur Pygathrix cinerea Infant escued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamGrey-shanked douc langur Pygathrix cinerea Infant escued from illegal wildlife trade Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420432

Grey-shanked douc langur Pygathrix cinerea Infant escued from

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Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420431

Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate

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Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420430

Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate

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Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, VietnamDelacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420429

Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri) Endangered Primate

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Red kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries ScotlandRed kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries ScotlandRed kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries Scotland© Mark Boulton / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents

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Red kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre

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Common Wombat Vombatus ursinus Seven-month-old orphaned joey (mother was hit by car) in kitchen foster home Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary, Tasmania, Australia *Captive- rescued and in rehabilitation programCommon Wombat Vombatus ursinus Seven-month-old orphaned joey (mother was hit by car) in kitchen foster home Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary, Tasmania, Australia *Captive- rescued and in rehabilitation programCommon Wombat Vombatus ursinus Seven-month-old orphaned joey (mother was hit by car) in kitchen foster home Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary, Tasmania, Australia *Captive- rescued and in rehabilitation program© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408284

Common Wombat Vombatus ursinus Seven-month-old orphaned joey

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Sunda pangolin Manis javanica Adult (rescued and rehabilitated, awaiting release) drinking water Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin Manis javanica Adult (rescued and rehabilitated, awaiting release) drinking water Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin Manis javanica Adult (rescued and rehabilitated, awaiting release) drinking water Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachers© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408250

Sunda pangolin Manis javanica Adult (rescued and rehabilitated,

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Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachers© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408249

Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Three-month-old baby, rescued and

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Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Caretaker holding three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Caretaker holding three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachersSunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Caretaker holding three-month-old baby, rescued and in rehabilitation Carnivore and Pangolin Conservation Program, Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam *Captive - rescued from poachers© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408248

Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) Caretaker holding three-month-old

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Sub-adult in tree, Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captiveGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Sub-adult in tree, Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captiveGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Sub-adult in tree, Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captive© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408230

Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Sub-adult in tree, Chengdu

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captive *Digitally removed branch in backgroundGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captive *Digitally removed branch in backgroundGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captive *Digitally removed branch in background© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408229

Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captiveGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captiveGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu, China *captive© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408228

Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) 6-8 month-old cub in tree

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North American Beaver (Castor canadensis )Six-week-old orphaned kit Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CA *Digitally removed feces from bottom of sinkNorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis )Six-week-old orphaned kit Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CA *Digitally removed feces from bottom of sinkNorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis )Six-week-old orphaned kit Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CA *Digitally removed feces from bottom of sink© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408162

North American Beaver (Castor canadensis )Six-week-old orphaned

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North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Six-week-old orphaned kit being fed Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Six-week-old orphaned kit being fed Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Six-week-old orphaned kit being fed Lindsay Wildlife Experience, Walnut Creek, CA© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408161

North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Six-week-old orphaned

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North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) being released into the wild after rehabilitation by Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue Sonoma County, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) being released into the wild after rehabilitation by Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue Sonoma County, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) being released into the wild after rehabilitation by Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue Sonoma County, CA© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408160

North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) Rescued beaver (found

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North American Beaver Castor canadensis Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CANorth American Beaver Castor canadensis Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CANorth American Beaver Castor canadensis Rescued beaver (found sick on vineyard) Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CA© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408159

North American Beaver Castor canadensis Rescued beaver (found

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North American Beaver (Castor canadensis), Danielle Mattos, Director of Animal Care at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, holding rescued beaver Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis), Danielle Mattos, Director of Animal Care at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, holding rescued beaver Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CANorth American Beaver (Castor canadensis), Danielle Mattos, Director of Animal Care at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, holding rescued beaver Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Petaluma, CA© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408158

North American Beaver (Castor canadensis), Danielle Mattos,

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) yawning on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) yawning on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) yawning on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2392376

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) yawning on a branch, Chengdu Research

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) sleeping on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) sleeping on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) sleeping on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) sleeping on a branch, Chengdu

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) sitting on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) sitting on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) sitting on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) sitting on a branch, Chengdu Research

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) on a branch, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2392373

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) on a branch, Chengdu Research and

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2392372

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2392371

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) on ground, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) on ground, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) on ground, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, ChinaRed panda (Ailurus fulgens) eating bamboo, Chengdu Research and Reproduction Center, Sichuan Province, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Eating Bamboo, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) youngs in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) youngs in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) youngs in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, ChinaGiant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) young in a tree, Chengdu Giant Panda Research Center, Sichuan, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Monk's vulture (Aegypius monachus) protecting its food from its congeners, SpainMonk's vulture (Aegypius monachus) protecting its food from its congeners, SpainMonk's vulture (Aegypius monachus) protecting its food from its congeners, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, SpainGriffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, SpainGriffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, SpainGriffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, SpainGriffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) resting on a stump, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Road sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, PortugalRoad sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, PortugalRoad sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Enclosure for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), GuadeloupeEnclosure for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), GuadeloupeEnclosure for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), Guadeloupe© Jean-Philippe Vantighem / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Enclosure for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee

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Pond for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), GuadeloupePond for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), GuadeloupePond for the reintroduction of the Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), Guadeloupe© Jean-Philippe Vantighem / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2130093

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Carribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus) in a pond for the reintroduction, GuadeloupeCarribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus) in a pond for the reintroduction, GuadeloupeCarribean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus) in a pond for the reintroduction, Guadeloupe© Jean-Philippe Vantighem / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Monk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) male and female on ground, SpainMonk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) male and female on ground, SpainMonk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) male and female on ground, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Monk vulture (Aegypius monachus), landing on the ground, SpainMonk vulture (Aegypius monachus), landing on the ground, SpainMonk vulture (Aegypius monachus), landing on the ground, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2127359

Monk vulture (Aegypius monachus), landing on the ground, Spain

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Monk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) on ground, SpainMonk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) on ground, SpainMonk Vulture (Aegypius monachus) on ground, Spain© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2127358

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120246

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120245

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120244

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120243

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120242

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120241

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120240

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120239

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120238

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120237

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de Granadilla, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain,© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120236

Captive Breeding Center of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus), Zarza de

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Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2119001

Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao,

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Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2119000

Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots,

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Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La Réunion© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102799

Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues

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Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102652

Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of

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Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102651

Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and

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Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102650

Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a

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Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102649

Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering

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Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102648

Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in

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Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102647

Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion

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Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102646

Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in

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Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102645

Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA

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Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102644

Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA

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One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102643

One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island

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Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102639

Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in

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Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102638

Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island.

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Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102637

Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade

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