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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081736

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand  ; Elephant Nature ParkAsian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Asian Elephant and young pulling grass - Thailand ; Elephant

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Young Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature ParkYoung Asian Elephant in vegetation - ThailandYoung Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030654

Young Asian Elephant in vegetation - Thailand ; Elephant Nature

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Young Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature ParkYoung Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - ThailandYoung Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030652

Young Asian Elephant pursuing a dog - Thailand ; Elephant Nature

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Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh Wildlife Rehabilitation CenterBorneo orangutan hanging from a brance - MalaysiaBorneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh Wildlife Rehabilitation Center© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Borneo orangutan hanging from a brance - Malaysia ; Semenggoh

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Portrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor KenyaPortrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor KenyaPortrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor Kenya© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1621872

Portrait of Rothschild Giraffe Giraffe Manor Kenya

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Rothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue KenyaRothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue KenyaRothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue Kenya© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1370455

Rothschild Giraffe sticking out his tongue Kenya

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Orangutans eating termites during flood season BorneoOrangutans eating termites during flood season BorneoOrangutans eating termites during flood season Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Orangutans eating termites during flood season Borneo

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Orangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island BorneoOrangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island BorneoOrangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Orangutan with 3 manggos in mouth Kajang island Borneo

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Southern Bornean Orangutan eating termites BorneoSouthern Bornean Orangutan eating termites BorneoSouthern Bornean Orangutan eating termites Borneo© Alain Compost / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Southern Bornean Orangutan eating termites Borneo

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Red kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries ScotlandRed kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries ScotlandRed kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre Dumfries Scotland© Mark Boulton / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2409750

Red kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, Bellymack Kite Feeding Centre

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Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2119001

Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), Dumbo Elephant Spca, Nong Tao,

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Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, ThailandAsian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots, Nong Tao, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2119000

Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) eating young bamboo shoots,

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Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La Réunion© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102799

Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues

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Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102652

Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of

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Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102651

Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and

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Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102650

Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a

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Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102649

Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering

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Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102648

Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in

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Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102647

Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion

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Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102646

Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in

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Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102645

Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA

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Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102644

Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA

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One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102643

One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island

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Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102639

Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in

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Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102638

Giant tortoise eating at the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island.

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Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102637

Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade

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Bernardin, nurse, preparing the food rations for each turtle at the KELONIA centre in the Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treament according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin, nurse, preparing the food rations for each turtle at the KELONIA centre in the Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treament according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin, nurse, preparing the food rations for each turtle at the KELONIA centre in the Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treament according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102636

Bernardin, nurse, preparing the food rations for each turtle at

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Thomas, nurse, preparing the food ration for each turtles and tortoises of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas, nurse, preparing the food ration for each turtles and tortoises of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas, nurse, preparing the food ration for each turtles and tortoises of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102635

Thomas, nurse, preparing the food ration for each turtles and

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Tortoises at the KELONIA health care centre are kept inside at night, otherwise they can be stolenSince sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Tortoises at the KELONIA health care centre are kept inside at night, otherwise they can be stolenSince sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Tortoises at the KELONIA health care centre are kept inside at night, otherwise they can be stolenSince sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102634

Tortoises at the KELONIA health care centre are kept inside at

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Thomas, nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in its pen in the public part of the centre. They are kept inside at nighttime otherwise the can be stolen. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas, nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in its pen in the public part of the centre. They are kept inside at nighttime otherwise the can be stolen. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas, nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in its pen in the public part of the centre. They are kept inside at nighttime otherwise the can be stolen. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102633

Thomas, nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a

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Loggerhead sea turtle with a severely damaged shell, taken in the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandLoggerhead sea turtle with a severely damaged shell, taken in the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandLoggerhead sea turtle with a severely damaged shell, taken in the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102631

Loggerhead sea turtle with a severely damaged shell, taken in the

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Nurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandNurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandNurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102630

Nurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea

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Young injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandYoung injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandYoung injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102629

Young injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia

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Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102628

Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph

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Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102627

Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph

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Nurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion IslandNurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion IslandNurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102626

Nurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection

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Kelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion IslandKelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion IslandKelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Kelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion

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Thomas, a nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in her pen in the public part of the centre, Reunion IslandThomas, a nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in her pen in the public part of the centre, Reunion IslandThomas, a nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a tortoise in her pen in the public part of the centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102623

Thomas, a nurse at the KELONIA health care centre, releasing a

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Coq chantant, Poule d'Alsace, Grande race, Centre de Réintroduction NaturOparc, Hunawihr, Alsace, FranceCoq chantant, Poule d'Alsace, Grande race, Centre de Réintroduction NaturOparc, Hunawihr, Alsace, FranceCoq chantant, Poule d'Alsace, Grande race, Centre de Réintroduction NaturOparc, Hunawihr, Alsace, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2088087

Coq chantant, Poule d'Alsace, Grande race, Centre de

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081740

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081739

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081738

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081737

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081735

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081734

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081733

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081732

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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Sumatran Rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) rehabilitation center, Way Kambas, SumatraSumatran Rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) rehabilitation center, Way Kambas, SumatraSumatran Rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) rehabilitation center, Way Kambas, Sumatra© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081731

Sumatran Rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) rehabilitation

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Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest, Rehabilitation center.Way-Kambas. Sumatra.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2081730

Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in forest,

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