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Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a can, Lembeh Strait, IndonesiaJuvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a can, Lembeh Strait, Indonesia© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2487238

Juvenile coconut octopus (Octopus marginatus) sheltering in a

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Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2487202

Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais,

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Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2487202

Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais,

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Plastic water bottles cut to protect young plantations in summer, Pas de Calais, FrancePlastic water bottles cut to protect young plantations in summer, Pas de Calais, FrancePlastic water bottles cut to protect young plantations in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2487199

Plastic water bottles cut to protect young plantations in summer,

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Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2487183

2487183

Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais,

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Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2487183

2487183

Protection net against snails on salads in summer, Pas de Calais,

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Protection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2487182

Protection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de

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Protection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, FranceProtection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2487182

Protection net against snails on cabbages in summer, Pas de

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Planting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2486919

Planting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees

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Planting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2486918

Planting of beech trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees

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Planting of oak, beech, cherry and lime trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of oak, beech, cherry and lime trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, FrancePlanting of oak, beech, cherry and lime trees after a sanitary cut of ash trees affected by chalarosis, Audinghen, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2486915

Planting of oak, beech, cherry and lime trees after a sanitary

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Carex EverColor® EverlimeCarex EverColor® EverlimeCarex EverColor® Everlime© Evercolor / Visions Pictures / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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Horticultural sales only allowed after written permission of the author
2486728

2486728

Carex EverColor® Everlime

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Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking a DNA sample from a large Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis), using a felt swab, for genetic studies. Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen Shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking a DNA sample from a large Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis), using a felt swab, for genetic studies. Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen Shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking a DNA sample from a large Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis), using a felt swab, for genetic studies. Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen Shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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2486453

Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking a

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Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2486452

2486452

Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking

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Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard inserting a tissue sample from a large Pen Shelll (Pinna nobilis) into a test tube in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard inserting a tissue sample from a large Pen Shelll (Pinna nobilis) into a test tube in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard inserting a tissue sample from a large Pen Shelll (Pinna nobilis) into a test tube in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2486451

2486451

Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard

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Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking tissue samples from a large Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), using biopsy forceps, for genetic studies in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2486450

2486450

Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard taking

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Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard counting the Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), along a transect in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard counting the Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), along a transect in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard counting the Pen shell (Pinna nobilis), along a transect in the Diana pond (Aléria, Haute-Corse). The Pen shell is a species classified as critically endangered following the epizootic (linked to a Haplosporidium parasite) which has affected the entire Mediterranean region since 2016.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
2486440

2486440

Researcher from the Institut Océanographique Paul Ricard counting

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Winter plant protectionWinter plant protectionWinter plant protection© VisionsPictures & Photography / Visions Pictures / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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Horticultural sales only allowed after written permission of the author
2486283

2486283

Winter plant protection

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Winter plant protectionWinter plant protectionWinter plant protection© VisionsPictures & Photography / Visions Pictures / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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Horticultural sales only allowed after written permission of the author
2486282

2486282

Winter plant protection

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Winter plant protectionWinter plant protectionWinter plant protection© VisionsPictures & Photography / Visions Pictures / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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Horticultural sales only allowed after written permission of the author
2486281

2486281

Winter plant protection

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Winter protection: Moving plant insideWinter protection: Moving plant insideWinter protection: Moving plant inside© VisionsPictures & Photography / Visions Pictures / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and the United Kingdom
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2486280

2486280

Winter protection: Moving plant inside

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Pair of Iridescent Scallops (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaPair of Iridescent Scallops (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaPair of Iridescent Scallops (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia© Colin Marshall / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2485073

Pair of Iridescent Scallops (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral

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Iridescent Scallop (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaIridescent Scallop (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, IndonesiaIridescent Scallop (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral (Scleractinia Order) crevices, a mutualistic relationship as corals benefit by scallop ejecting water to repel foraging starfish and scallop benefit by gaining habitat, Underwater Temple dive site, Pemuteran, Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia© Colin Marshall / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2485071

2485071

Iridescent Scallop (Pedum spondyloideum) in Hard Coral

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Cherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, EuropeCherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, EuropeCherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, Europe© Helmut Meyer zur Capellen / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484940

2484940

Cherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry

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Cherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, EuropeCherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, EuropeCherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry harvest, Bavaria, Germany, Europe© Helmut Meyer zur Capellen / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484940

2484940

Cherry plantation with stretched hail protection during cherry

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Windsurfers in Wissant, Cap Blanc-Nez, Opal Coast, Pas de Calais, FranceWindsurfers in Wissant, Cap Blanc-Nez, Opal Coast, Pas de Calais, FranceWindsurfers in Wissant, Cap Blanc-Nez, Opal Coast, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2484726

Windsurfers in Wissant, Cap Blanc-Nez, Opal Coast, Pas de Calais,

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A pair of manned Mars rovers rendezvous on the martian surface. . Humans may one day explore the martian surface with the help of pressurized rovers that would provide a shirt sleeve environment while protecting them from the deadly extremes of the martian environment. In this image each rover provides transportation and life support for two crew members. By traveling in pairs each rover can provide backup for the other, and if necessary a single rover could serve as refuge and transportation for all four explorers.A pair of manned Mars rovers rendezvous on the martian surface. . Humans may one day explore the martian surface with the help of pressurized rovers that would provide a shirt sleeve environment while protecting them from the deadly extremes of the martian environment. In this image each rover provides transportation and life support for two crew members. By traveling in pairs each rover can provide backup for the other, and if necessary a single rover could serve as refuge and transportation for all four explorers.A pair of manned Mars rovers rendezvous on the martian surface. . Humans may one day explore the martian surface with the help of pressurized rovers that would provide a shirt sleeve environment while protecting them from the deadly extremes of the martian environment. In this image each rover provides transportation and life support for two crew members. By traveling in pairs each rover can provide backup for the other, and if necessary a single rover could serve as refuge and transportation for all four explorers.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484624

2484624

A pair of manned Mars rovers rendezvous on the martian surface. .

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A manned rover pauses in a martian canyon while an explorer in a protective pressurized suit departs. . This rover provides a pressurized shirtsleeve environment enabling a crew of two to explore a large amount of martian surface for weeks at a time in the relative comfort of an earthbound motor home. For excursions beyond the confines of the rover two pressure suits are mounted on the back. The suits can be entered from within the rover and then detached via an airtight hatch minimizing crew contact with the abrasive and possibly caustic martian dust.A manned rover pauses in a martian canyon while an explorer in a protective pressurized suit departs. . This rover provides a pressurized shirtsleeve environment enabling a crew of two to explore a large amount of martian surface for weeks at a time in the relative comfort of an earthbound motor home. For excursions beyond the confines of the rover two pressure suits are mounted on the back. The suits can be entered from within the rover and then detached via an airtight hatch minimizing crew contact with the abrasive and possibly caustic martian dust.A manned rover pauses in a martian canyon while an explorer in a protective pressurized suit departs. . This rover provides a pressurized shirtsleeve environment enabling a crew of two to explore a large amount of martian surface for weeks at a time in the relative comfort of an earthbound motor home. For excursions beyond the confines of the rover two pressure suits are mounted on the back. The suits can be entered from within the rover and then detached via an airtight hatch minimizing crew contact with the abrasive and possibly caustic martian dust.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484623

2484623

A manned rover pauses in a martian canyon while an explorer in a

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Artist's concept of astronauts exploring the surface of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan's first human visitors are protected by thick suits and helmets to shield them from the extreme cold, and possibly toxic compounds such as hydrogen cyanide. They carry their own oxygen as Titan's atmosphere is primarily nitrogen with lesser amounts of argon, methane and other gases. Each explorer also carries head lights attached to their helmets to help them navigate a terrain that receives only 1/1000th the Sun's illumination on the Earth; while this means that noon on Titan would appear relatively dim, it would yet be over 300 times brighter than the Earth under a full moon. . Beneath Titan's 350 miles of atmosphere, intrepid explorers would likely find a dark, forbidding landscape of rock, ice, and possibly tarry layers of hydrocarbons and lakes of liquid ethane and/or methane (AKA natural gas). The Surface temperature would be around minus 300° F, cold enough to freeze exposed human tissue within seconds. There would be no oxygen to breathe, and any water to be found would be as hard and dense as granite. Despite these harsh conditions, Titan could yet yield secrets regarding the origin of life itself as it is believed that, with the exception of the extreme cold, Titan resembles the primordial Earth at the time living organisms first appeared. . Perhaps some day in the far future humans will set foot on Saturn's mysterious moon Titan, one of the most interesting worlds in the Solar System. Larger than the planet Mercury, Earth's moon, and the dwarf planet Pluto, and second only in size to Jupiter's satellite Ganymede, Titan is the only known extraterrestrial world with a dense atmosphere that realistically could be visited by humans. A visit to Titan would require a space journey of a year or more and traverse over 700 million miles. . . 
Artist's concept of astronauts exploring the surface of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan's first human visitors are protected by thick suits and helmets to shield them from the extreme cold, and possibly toxic compounds such as hydrogen cyanide. They carry their own oxygen as Titan's atmosphere is primarily nitrogen with lesser amounts of argon, methane and other gases. Each explorer also carries head lights attached to their helmets to help them navigate a terrain that receives only 1/1000th the Sun's illumination on the Earth; while this means that noon on Titan would appear relatively dim, it would yet be over 300 times brighter than the Earth under a full moon. . Beneath Titan's 350 miles of atmosphere, intrepid explorers would likely find a dark, forbidding landscape of rock, ice, and possibly tarry layers of hydrocarbons and lakes of liquid ethane and/or methane (AKA natural gas). The Surface temperature would be around minus 300° F, cold enough to freeze exposed human tissue within seconds. There would be no oxygen to breathe, and any water to be found would be as hard and dense as granite. Despite these harsh conditions, Titan could yet yield secrets regarding the origin of life itself as it is believed that, with the exception of the extreme cold, Titan resembles the primordial Earth at the time living organisms first appeared. . Perhaps some day in the far future humans will set foot on Saturn's mysterious moon Titan, one of the most interesting worlds in the Solar System. Larger than the planet Mercury, Earth's moon, and the dwarf planet Pluto, and second only in size to Jupiter's satellite Ganymede, Titan is the only known extraterrestrial world with a dense atmosphere that realistically could be visited by humans. A visit to Titan would require a space journey of a year or more and traverse over 700 million miles. . . Artist's concept of astronauts exploring the surface of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan's first human visitors are protected by thick suits and helmets to shield them from the extreme cold, and possibly toxic compounds such as hydrogen cyanide. They carry their own oxygen as Titan's atmosphere is primarily nitrogen with lesser amounts of argon, methane and other gases. Each explorer also carries head lights attached to their helmets to help them navigate a terrain that receives only 1/1000th the Sun's illumination on the Earth; while this means that noon on Titan would appear relatively dim, it would yet be over 300 times brighter than the Earth under a full moon. . Beneath Titan's 350 miles of atmosphere, intrepid explorers would likely find a dark, forbidding landscape of rock, ice, and possibly tarry layers of hydrocarbons and lakes of liquid ethane and/or methane (AKA natural gas). The Surface temperature would be around minus 300° F, cold enough to freeze exposed human tissue within seconds. There would be no oxygen to breathe, and any water to be found would be as hard and dense as granite. Despite these harsh conditions, Titan could yet yield secrets regarding the origin of life itself as it is believed that, with the exception of the extreme cold, Titan resembles the primordial Earth at the time living organisms first appeared. . Perhaps some day in the far future humans will set foot on Saturn's mysterious moon Titan, one of the most interesting worlds in the Solar System. Larger than the planet Mercury, Earth's moon, and the dwarf planet Pluto, and second only in size to Jupiter's satellite Ganymede, Titan is the only known extraterrestrial world with a dense atmosphere that realistically could be visited by humans. A visit to Titan would require a space journey of a year or more and traverse over 700 million miles. . . © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484532

2484532

Artist's concept of astronauts exploring the surface of Saturn's

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Illustration of a space shuttle re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. In order for the Space Shuttle to return to Earth it must shed 18,000 miles per hour of velocity and descend low enough to make an unpowered glide to a landing strip. With 115 tons of vehicle traveling fast enough to circle the globe once every 90 minutes, there is a tremendous amount of kinetic energy to dispose of. The Shuttle disposes this energy like every other manned space vehicle: it uses the Earth's atmosphere to convert its kinetic energy into heat. The Shuttle does this by slowly descending into the atmosphere bellyside-down at a 40 degree angle. This presents a large, blunt surface to the rushing air that continues to slow the orbiter for the next 16 minutes. . Through a combination of friction and compression, the temperature of the air around the Shuttle rises to 3,000 °F, hot enough to ionize the air into a glowing plasma trail that extends for miles behind the Shuttle. One effect of this plasma is to block all radio contact between the orbiter and ground control during the duration of reentry. . The Shuttle withstands the punishment of reentry via a thermal protection system that consists of thousands of individual silica tiles. The tiles, which are essentially bricks of very pure quartz sand, prevent heat transfer to the underlying orbiter aluminum skin and structure.Illustration of a space shuttle re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. In order for the Space Shuttle to return to Earth it must shed 18,000 miles per hour of velocity and descend low enough to make an unpowered glide to a landing strip. With 115 tons of vehicle traveling fast enough to circle the globe once every 90 minutes, there is a tremendous amount of kinetic energy to dispose of. The Shuttle disposes this energy like every other manned space vehicle: it uses the Earth's atmosphere to convert its kinetic energy into heat. The Shuttle does this by slowly descending into the atmosphere bellyside-down at a 40 degree angle. This presents a large, blunt surface to the rushing air that continues to slow the orbiter for the next 16 minutes. . Through a combination of friction and compression, the temperature of the air around the Shuttle rises to 3,000 °F, hot enough to ionize the air into a glowing plasma trail that extends for miles behind the Shuttle. One effect of this plasma is to block all radio contact between the orbiter and ground control during the duration of reentry. . The Shuttle withstands the punishment of reentry via a thermal protection system that consists of thousands of individual silica tiles. The tiles, which are essentially bricks of very pure quartz sand, prevent heat transfer to the underlying orbiter aluminum skin and structure.Illustration of a space shuttle re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. In order for the Space Shuttle to return to Earth it must shed 18,000 miles per hour of velocity and descend low enough to make an unpowered glide to a landing strip. With 115 tons of vehicle traveling fast enough to circle the globe once every 90 minutes, there is a tremendous amount of kinetic energy to dispose of. The Shuttle disposes this energy like every other manned space vehicle: it uses the Earth's atmosphere to convert its kinetic energy into heat. The Shuttle does this by slowly descending into the atmosphere bellyside-down at a 40 degree angle. This presents a large, blunt surface to the rushing air that continues to slow the orbiter for the next 16 minutes. . Through a combination of friction and compression, the temperature of the air around the Shuttle rises to 3,000 °F, hot enough to ionize the air into a glowing plasma trail that extends for miles behind the Shuttle. One effect of this plasma is to block all radio contact between the orbiter and ground control during the duration of reentry. . The Shuttle withstands the punishment of reentry via a thermal protection system that consists of thousands of individual silica tiles. The tiles, which are essentially bricks of very pure quartz sand, prevent heat transfer to the underlying orbiter aluminum skin and structure.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484521

2484521

Illustration of a space shuttle re-entering the Earth's

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A soon-to-be lunar explorer takes a last look at Earth before entering orbit around the moon. At this point in the journey, the moon nearly fills the field of view at a distance of only 3,000 miles. Closing at a speed of 25,000 mph, the explorer will need to return to the airlock soon if she is to be safely inside before the thrusters file, slowing the tug/lunar lander combination down to an orbital velocity.A soon-to-be lunar explorer takes a last look at Earth before entering orbit around the moon. At this point in the journey, the moon nearly fills the field of view at a distance of only 3,000 miles. Closing at a speed of 25,000 mph, the explorer will need to return to the airlock soon if she is to be safely inside before the thrusters file, slowing the tug/lunar lander combination down to an orbital velocity.A soon-to-be lunar explorer takes a last look at Earth before entering orbit around the moon. At this point in the journey, the moon nearly fills the field of view at a distance of only 3,000 miles. Closing at a speed of 25,000 mph, the explorer will need to return to the airlock soon if she is to be safely inside before the thrusters file, slowing the tug/lunar lander combination down to an orbital velocity.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484502

2484502

A soon-to-be lunar explorer takes a last look at Earth before

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Light bulb with tree inside glass, isolated on white background.Light bulb with tree inside glass, isolated on white background.Light bulb with tree inside glass, isolated on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484376

2484376

Light bulb with tree inside glass, isolated on white background.

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Woman's hands holding soil with a tree heart shaped. Viewed from a side, on white background.Woman's hands holding soil with a tree heart shaped. Viewed from a side, on white background.Woman's hands holding soil with a tree heart shaped. Viewed from a side, on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484370

2484370

Woman's hands holding soil with a tree heart shaped. Viewed from

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Woman's hands holding soil with a tree. Viewed from a side, on white background.Woman's hands holding soil with a tree. Viewed from a side, on white background.Woman's hands holding soil with a tree. Viewed from a side, on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484369

2484369

Woman's hands holding soil with a tree. Viewed from a side, on

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Human hand holding Earth globe with a beautiful green landscape and river background.Human hand holding Earth globe with a beautiful green landscape and river background.Human hand holding Earth globe with a beautiful green landscape and river background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484361

2484361

Human hand holding Earth globe with a beautiful green landscape

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Planet Earth with a tree on top, inside a glass bottle.Planet Earth with a tree on top, inside a glass bottle.Planet Earth with a tree on top, inside a glass bottle.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484359

2484359

Planet Earth with a tree on top, inside a glass bottle.

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Last planet of a kind, kept by its guardians in a protective force field.Last planet of a kind, kept by its guardians in a protective force field.Last planet of a kind, kept by its guardians in a protective force field.© Tomasz Dabrowski / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484338

2484338

Last planet of a kind, kept by its guardians in a protective

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Some time in the future, Gale Crater may be enclosed in a protective dome to create an Earth like ecosphere.Some time in the future, Gale Crater may be enclosed in a protective dome to create an Earth like ecosphere.Some time in the future, Gale Crater may be enclosed in a protective dome to create an Earth like ecosphere.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484203

2484203

Some time in the future, Gale Crater may be enclosed in a

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A space capsule reenters the Earth's atmosphere as it's heat shield glows from the heat of friction and burns. Elements of this image courtesy of NASA.A space capsule reenters the Earth's atmosphere as it's heat shield glows from the heat of friction and burns. Elements of this image courtesy of NASA.A space capsule reenters the Earth's atmosphere as it's heat shield glows from the heat of friction and burns. Elements of this image courtesy of NASA.© Marc Ward / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483553

2483553

A space capsule reenters the Earth's atmosphere as it's heat

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An artist's depiction of the magnetic lines of force surrounding Earth. Known as the magnetosphere, this area around the planet protects our world from the charged particles of the solar wind. Elements of this image furnished by NASAAn artist's depiction of the magnetic lines of force surrounding Earth. Known as the magnetosphere, this area around the planet protects our world from the charged particles of the solar wind. Elements of this image furnished by NASAAn artist's depiction of the magnetic lines of force surrounding Earth. Known as the magnetosphere, this area around the planet protects our world from the charged particles of the solar wind. Elements of this image furnished by NASA© Marc Ward / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483550

2483550

An artist's depiction of the magnetic lines of force surrounding

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Full moon setting above a lake in Houston, Texas, USA.Full moon setting above a lake in Houston, Texas, USA.Full moon setting above a lake in Houston, Texas, USA.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482959

2482959

Full moon setting above a lake in Houston, Texas, USA.

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A domed crater is home to a lunar city. Earth rises in the background.A domed crater is home to a lunar city. Earth rises in the background.A domed crater is home to a lunar city. Earth rises in the background.© Frieso Hoevelkamp / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482298

2482298

A domed crater is home to a lunar city. Earth rises in the

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The people of this world have managed to poison their atmosphere by building a giant domed city in an asteroid crater as a last refuge.The people of this world have managed to poison their atmosphere by building a giant domed city in an asteroid crater as a last refuge.The people of this world have managed to poison their atmosphere by building a giant domed city in an asteroid crater as a last refuge.© Frieso Hoevelkamp / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482276

2482276

The people of this world have managed to poison their atmosphere

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A laser anti-asteroid defense system built on an extraterrestrial world.A laser anti-asteroid defense system built on an extraterrestrial world.A laser anti-asteroid defense system built on an extraterrestrial world.© Frieso Hoevelkamp / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482273

2482273

A laser anti-asteroid defense system built on an extraterrestrial

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Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.© Elena Duvernay / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482114

2482114

Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.

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Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.© Elena Duvernay / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482113

2482113

Astronaut floating in outer space above planet Earth.

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Godrevy Lighthouse in Cornwall, England.Godrevy Lighthouse in Cornwall, England.Godrevy Lighthouse in Cornwall, England.© Arild Heitmann / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2481727

2481727

Godrevy Lighthouse in Cornwall, England.

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Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France© Jean-François Noblet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2480602

2480602

Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France

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Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France© Jean-François Noblet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2480602

2480602

Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France

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Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, FranceCleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France© Jean-François Noblet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2480602

2480602

Cleaning of asbestos cement dumps, France

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