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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) eating a seven-arm octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) under the surface, Azores, North AtlanticLoggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) eating a seven-arm octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) under the surface, Azores, North AtlanticLoggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) eating a seven-arm octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) under the surface, Azores, North Atlantic© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2135390

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) eating a seven-arm octopus

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Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic Ocean© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2135363

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), Terceira Island, Azores,

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Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), mother and young, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), mother and young, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), mother and young, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic Ocean© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2135362

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus), mother and young, Terceira

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King of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageKing of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageKing of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2090818

King of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal.

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White Stork, Cabo Sardao, Natural Park of Southwest Alentejo and Costa Vicentina, Alentejo, Portugal, EuropeWhite Stork, Cabo Sardao, Natural Park of Southwest Alentejo and Costa Vicentina, Alentejo, Portugal, EuropeWhite Stork, Cabo Sardao, Natural Park of Southwest Alentejo and Costa Vicentina, Alentejo, Portugal, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2088869

White Stork, Cabo Sardao, Natural Park of Southwest Alentejo and

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Sicklefin Mobula with Remora - AzoresSicklefin Mobula with Remora - AzoresSicklefin Mobula with Remora - Azores© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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1959017

Sicklefin Mobula with Remora - Azores

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Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores © Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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1808667

Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores

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Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores © Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents
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1808666

Blue Shark beneath the surface North Atlantic Azores

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Large ball of Blue jack mackerel AzoresLarge ball of Blue jack mackerel AzoresLarge ball of Blue jack mackerel Azores© Christopher Swann / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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1715496

Large ball of Blue jack mackerel Azores

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Cory's sheerwater and common dolphin preying jack mackerelCory's sheerwater and common dolphin preying jack mackerelCory's sheerwater and common dolphin preying jack mackerel© Christopher Swann / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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1715487

Cory's sheerwater and common dolphin preying jack mackerel

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Shark at top of a large ball of Blue jack mackerel AzoresShark at top of a large ball of Blue jack mackerel AzoresShark at top of a large ball of Blue jack mackerel Azores© Christopher Swann / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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1715474

Shark at top of a large ball of Blue jack mackerel Azores

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Blue jack mackerel being preyed upon by common dolphinsBlue jack mackerel being preyed upon by common dolphinsBlue jack mackerel being preyed upon by common dolphins© Christopher Swann / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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1715464

Blue jack mackerel being preyed upon by common dolphins

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Group of False killer whales swimming AzoresGroup of False killer whales swimming AzoresGroup of False killer whales swimming Azores© Christopher Swann / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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1715319

Group of False killer whales swimming Azores

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Thread Lacewing on dry flower PortugalThread Lacewing on dry flower PortugalThread Lacewing on dry flower Portugal© Luis Ferreira / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1681921

Thread Lacewing on dry flower Portugal

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Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) close to the water surface, Azores, Portugal, EuropeSperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) close to the water surface, Azores, Portugal, EuropeSperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) close to the water surface, Azores, Portugal, Europe© Michael Weberberger / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2087425

Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) close to the water surface,

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Horseshoe Whip Snake (Hemorrhois hippocrepis)Horseshoe Whip Snake (Hemorrhois hippocrepis)Horseshoe Whip Snake (Hemorrhois hippocrepis)© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2426346

Horseshoe Whip Snake (Hemorrhois hippocrepis)

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Matthiola maderensis is a flowering plant species native and endemic to the Madeira Islands. This image was taken in Madeira one afternoon in late February 2018 as the sky darkened as a storm approached. I used a wide angle to highlight this beautiful endemic flower in its natural environment so unique between sea and dry lawn.Matthiola maderensis is a flowering plant species native and endemic to the Madeira Islands. This image was taken in Madeira one afternoon in late February 2018 as the sky darkened as a storm approached. I used a wide angle to highlight this beautiful endemic flower in its natural environment so unique between sea and dry lawn.Matthiola maderensis is a flowering plant species native and endemic to the Madeira Islands. This image was taken in Madeira one afternoon in late February 2018 as the sky darkened as a storm approached. I used a wide angle to highlight this beautiful endemic flower in its natural environment so unique between sea and dry lawn.© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Matthiola maderensis is a flowering plant species native and

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Madeira firecrest (Regulus madeirensis) Ribeiro frio, MadeiraMadeira firecrest (Regulus madeirensis) Ribeiro frio, MadeiraMadeira firecrest (Regulus madeirensis) Ribeiro frio, Madeira© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2425061

Madeira firecrest (Regulus madeirensis) Ribeiro frio, Madeira

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The trocaz pigeon (Columba trocaz) is endemic to the island of Madeira. Ribeiro frioThe trocaz pigeon (Columba trocaz) is endemic to the island of Madeira. Ribeiro frioThe trocaz pigeon (Columba trocaz) is endemic to the island of Madeira. Ribeiro frio© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2425059

The trocaz pigeon (Columba trocaz) is endemic to the island of

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Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2424491

Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420136

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420135

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420134

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420133

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman.

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Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420132

Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic

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Estrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, PortugalEstrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, PortugalEstrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420131

Estrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with

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White crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South PortugalWhite crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South PortugalWhite crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409054

White crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the

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Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) and its chicks on a cliff in the Algarve, PortugalHerring Gull (Larus argentatus) and its chicks on a cliff in the Algarve, PortugalHerring Gull (Larus argentatus) and its chicks on a cliff in the Algarve, Portugal© Franck Gueffier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) and its chicks on a cliff in the

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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Light refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. PortugalLight refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. PortugalLight refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405319

Light refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light

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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405318

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

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Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405317

Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny

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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405316

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

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Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405118

Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that

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Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405117

Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that

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False boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, PortugalFalse boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, PortugalFalse boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405116

False boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible

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Tourists degrading cliffs at Falésia beach in Algarve, PortugalTourists degrading cliffs at Falésia beach in Algarve, PortugalTourists degrading cliffs at Falésia beach in Algarve, Portugal© Franck Gueffier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2405108

Tourists degrading cliffs at Falésia beach in Algarve, Portugal

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Falésia beach in Albufeira in the Algarve, PortugalFalésia beach in Albufeira in the Algarve, PortugalFalésia beach in Albufeira in the Algarve, Portugal© Franck Gueffier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2405107

Falésia beach in Albufeira in the Algarve, Portugal

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Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageCrocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageCrocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405039

Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the

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Northern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. AzoresNorthern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. AzoresNorthern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. Azores© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401766

Northern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory

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Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401752

Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the

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Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the Tagus River next to Vila Velha de Ródão. These are sludges of organic matter deposited over several years in the river bed because of the reduced flow. These materials come from sewage effluents from several manufacturing companies, mainly from paper mills. As the flow of the Tagus river has been greatly reduced in Spain because of its transfer to the South these organic materials have accumulated over the years forming a thick layer of organic matter in the bed of the river that has killed the whole aquatic life. Organic pollution.These sludges are being conditioned in flexible containers at the bank and then moved to a place where they can be properly treated without environmental impact. Vila Velha de Ródão, Portugal 2018© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401751

Barge with divers who are working on cleaning the bottom of the

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Dead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. PortugalDead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. PortugalDead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401748

Dead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows

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Dead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. Note leg band. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. PortugalDead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. Note leg band. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. PortugalDead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible, by reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. Sadly, the bird often dies, even when it is only temporarily stunned and manages to fly away. Many times these birds die later from internal bleeding or bruising, especially on the brain. There’s one additional reason: birds sometimes see their reflection in a window and attack it. This happens most frequently in the spring when territoriality is high. Note leg band. It's probably a bird that escaped from a birdcage. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401747

Dead parakeet after hitting a window. For birds, glass windows

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Portugal laurel (Prunus lusitanica) topiary in containerPortugal laurel (Prunus lusitanica) topiary in containerPortugal laurel (Prunus lusitanica) topiary in container© Frédéric Tournay / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2399371

Portugal laurel (Prunus lusitanica) topiary in container

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Six pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imageSix pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imageSix pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case six pack rings does not guarantee him any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397554

Six pack rings accompanied by a young horse mackerel. These fish

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Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397553

Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes

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Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397552

Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young

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Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397551

Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397549

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397548

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Ocean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageOcean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageOcean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by a jellyfish, or medusa, that is a natural food for him. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396879

Ocean sunfish, Mola mola, trying to eat a plastic bag mistaken by

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Assassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. PortugalAssassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. PortugalAssassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396699

Assassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a

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Assassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. PortugalAssassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. PortugalAssassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a praying mantis, it is a species belonging to the family Reduviidae of the order Hemiptera: the true bugs. Eats small insects. Lives inside houses or in close proximity. Distributed in Europe and Northern Asia, excluding China. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396698

Assassin bug, Ploiaria domestica. Although vaguely resembling a

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Mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, adult beetle still brown after pupa metamorphosis. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. PortugalMealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, adult beetle still brown after pupa metamorphosis. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. PortugalMealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, adult beetle still brown after pupa metamorphosis. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396697

Mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, adult beetle still brown after

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Mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, pupa. Pupa is the second stage of the development just before the adult insect. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. PortugalMealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, pupa. Pupa is the second stage of the development just before the adult insect. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. PortugalMealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, pupa. Pupa is the second stage of the development just before the adult insect. Mealworms are considered pests, because their larvae feed on stored grains. They are edible for humans, and are commonly consumed in a practice known as entomophagy. Mealworms have been consumed in many Asian countries, particularly in Southeast Asia. They are commonly found in food markets and sold as street food alongside other edible insects. In 2015, it was discovered that mealworms are capable of degrading polystyrene into usable organic matter. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396696

Mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, pupa. Pupa is the second stage

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Common cockchafer or European cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha, larvae underground. After mating, females lay around 20 eggs in soft soil. After 4-6 weeks the larvae hatches out. It takes 3-4 years for the larvae to become fully developed, and they burrow deeper into the soil each winter to hibernate. The larvae can be serious pests of grasses and cereals, as they live in the soil feeding on roots. They also attack other garden plants and vegetables. PortugalCommon cockchafer or European cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha, larvae underground. After mating, females lay around 20 eggs in soft soil. After 4-6 weeks the larvae hatches out. It takes 3-4 years for the larvae to become fully developed, and they burrow deeper into the soil each winter to hibernate. The larvae can be serious pests of grasses and cereals, as they live in the soil feeding on roots. They also attack other garden plants and vegetables. PortugalCommon cockchafer or European cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha, larvae underground. After mating, females lay around 20 eggs in soft soil. After 4-6 weeks the larvae hatches out. It takes 3-4 years for the larvae to become fully developed, and they burrow deeper into the soil each winter to hibernate. The larvae can be serious pests of grasses and cereals, as they live in the soil feeding on roots. They also attack other garden plants and vegetables. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396695

Common cockchafer or European cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha,

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Common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta. It's a deep sea fish found in temperate and tropical oceans worldwide, at depths of from 2 to 5,000 metres. Grow to a total length of about 18 cm. Is a predator and feeds on other fish, crustaceans and cephalopods. They are themselves preyed on by tuna, marlin and albacore. Composite. From Azores. Composite imageCommon fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta. It's a deep sea fish found in temperate and tropical oceans worldwide, at depths of from 2 to 5,000 metres. Grow to a total length of about 18 cm. Is a predator and feeds on other fish, crustaceans and cephalopods. They are themselves preyed on by tuna, marlin and albacore. Composite. From Azores. Composite imageCommon fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta. It's a deep sea fish found in temperate and tropical oceans worldwide, at depths of from 2 to 5,000 metres. Grow to a total length of about 18 cm. Is a predator and feeds on other fish, crustaceans and cephalopods. They are themselves preyed on by tuna, marlin and albacore. Composite. From Azores. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396694

Common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta. It's a deep sea fish

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Oceanic two-wing flyingfish, Exocoetus obtusirostris, flying. Is an endemic species to the Atlantic Ocean and showed no significant differences from different parts of this ocean. It is consumed by a large variety of predatory fishes, such as dolphinfishes, tunas, snake mackerel, and the rainbow runner. Composite image. From Madeira. Composite imageOceanic two-wing flyingfish, Exocoetus obtusirostris, flying. Is an endemic species to the Atlantic Ocean and showed no significant differences from different parts of this ocean. It is consumed by a large variety of predatory fishes, such as dolphinfishes, tunas, snake mackerel, and the rainbow runner. Composite image. From Madeira. Composite imageOceanic two-wing flyingfish, Exocoetus obtusirostris, flying. Is an endemic species to the Atlantic Ocean and showed no significant differences from different parts of this ocean. It is consumed by a large variety of predatory fishes, such as dolphinfishes, tunas, snake mackerel, and the rainbow runner. Composite image. From Madeira. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396693

Oceanic two-wing flyingfish, Exocoetus obtusirostris, flying. Is

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Opah, Lampris guttatus, being photographed by a diver. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite imageOpah, Lampris guttatus, being photographed by a diver. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite imageOpah, Lampris guttatus, being photographed by a diver. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396692

Opah, Lampris guttatus, being photographed by a diver. This fish

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Opah, Lampris guttatus, swimming under the boat. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite imageOpah, Lampris guttatus, swimming under the boat. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite imageOpah, Lampris guttatus, swimming under the boat. This fish is able to maintain its entire body core above ambient temperature, becoming the first known fish with this trait ('whole-body endothermy'). The fish generates heat as well as propulsion with continuous movements of its pectoral fins (the musculature of which is insulated by a one-cm-thick layer of fat), and the vasculature of its gill tissue is arranged to conserve heat by a process of countercurrent heat exchange, a structure known as a rete mirabile (plural, retia).[6][7] It can consistently keep its body core approximately 5 °C warmer than its environment. He also increase aerobic performance include high hematocrit and a relatively large heart, gill surface area and aerobic muscle mass. These adaptations for high performance predation are similar to those found in tuna and lamnid sharks, which actively chase down their prey, but are very unusual among lampridiform fish, which are mostly sluggish ambush predators. Azores. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396691

Opah, Lampris guttatus, swimming under the boat. This fish is

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Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Azores. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Azores. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Azores. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396690

Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal

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Mitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, swimming. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite imageMitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, swimming. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite imageMitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, swimming. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396687

Mitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, swimming. It'a a rare species

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Mitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, head detail. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite imageMitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, head detail. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite imageMitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, head detail. It'a a rare species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a "living fossil", it is the only representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. They inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts throughout the world at depths greater than 100 m. It has been caught as deep as 1,300 m. Goblin sharks are often unintentionally caught by deepwater fisheries. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396686

Mitsukurina owstoni, Goblin shark, head detail. It'a a rare

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Plastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imagePlastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imagePlastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2395869

Plastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal.

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Sargassum fish, Histrio histrio. Refugee in an old plastic shoe drifting in the sea next to another floating garbage. Offshore Madeira Island, Portugal. Composite imageSargassum fish, Histrio histrio. Refugee in an old plastic shoe drifting in the sea next to another floating garbage. Offshore Madeira Island, Portugal. Composite imageSargassum fish, Histrio histrio. Refugee in an old plastic shoe drifting in the sea next to another floating garbage. Offshore Madeira Island, Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2395409

Sargassum fish, Histrio histrio. Refugee in an old plastic shoe

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Ears of flowers on a Laurel of Portugal (Prunus lusitanica) planted at the foot of a wall in front of a house on the edge of a street in a village, in spring, in May, in Picardie - France.Ears of flowers on a Laurel of Portugal (Prunus lusitanica) planted at the foot of a wall in front of a house on the edge of a street in a village, in spring, in May, in Picardie - France.Ears of flowers on a Laurel of Portugal (Prunus lusitanica) planted at the foot of a wall in front of a house on the edge of a street in a village, in spring, in May, in Picardie - France.© Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2394085

Ears of flowers on a Laurel of Portugal (Prunus lusitanica)

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Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) pair on barbed wire, Extremadura, SpainBarn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) pair on barbed wire, Extremadura, SpainBarn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) pair on barbed wire, Extremadura, Spain© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) pair on barbed wire, Extremadura,

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Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) with a free diver, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) with a free diver, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) with a free diver, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic Ocean© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2393218

Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) with a free diver, Terceira

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Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) juvénile, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) juvénile, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic OceanBlue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) juvénile, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal, Atlantic Ocean© Gérard Soury / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2393217

Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) juvénile, Terceira Island,

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Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus. Is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe. PortugalNorway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus. Is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe. PortugalNorway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus. Is the most important commercial crustacean in Europe. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393049

Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus. Is the most important

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River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393045

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

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River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393044

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

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River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393043

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

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Men removing water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, from lake. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalMen removing water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, from lake. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalMen removing water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, from lake. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393038

Men removing water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, from lake.

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Water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalWater hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalWater hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393037

Water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant

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Water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalWater hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, PortugalWater hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range. When not controlled, water hyacinth will cover lakes and ponds entirely; this dramatically affects water flow, blocks sunlight from reaching native aquatic plants, which often die. Tejo (Tagus) river, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393036

Water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes. It's an aquatic plant

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Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Body detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Body detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Body detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393035

Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Body

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Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Last body segment detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Last body segment detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Last body segment detail. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393034

Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Last body

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Common Brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni. Caterpillar eating cabbage leaf. PortugalCommon Brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni. Caterpillar eating cabbage leaf. PortugalCommon Brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni. Caterpillar eating cabbage leaf. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393033

Common Brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni. Caterpillar eating cabbage

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White butterfly parasite, Cotesia glomerata. Its a small (3-7mm) black wasp that parasitize a wide range of Pieris butterfly species. The female is inject her eggs inside a young larvae of a Large white butterfly, Pieris brassica. After 15 to 20 days the larvae emerge, killing the parasitized caterpillar. These newly emerged larvae spin cocoons in a cluster on or nearby the host caterpillar; after 7 to 10 days the imago adult wasps hatch from these cocoons. In the photo a larvae is emerging from the butterfly caterpillar and the previous ones are already pupate around the caterpillar body in silken cocoons. PortugalWhite butterfly parasite, Cotesia glomerata. Its a small (3-7mm) black wasp that parasitize a wide range of Pieris butterfly species. The female is inject her eggs inside a young larvae of a Large white butterfly, Pieris brassica. After 15 to 20 days the larvae emerge, killing the parasitized caterpillar. These newly emerged larvae spin cocoons in a cluster on or nearby the host caterpillar; after 7 to 10 days the imago adult wasps hatch from these cocoons. In the photo a larvae is emerging from the butterfly caterpillar and the previous ones are already pupate around the caterpillar body in silken cocoons. PortugalWhite butterfly parasite, Cotesia glomerata. Its a small (3-7mm) black wasp that parasitize a wide range of Pieris butterfly species. The female is inject her eggs inside a young larvae of a Large white butterfly, Pieris brassica. After 15 to 20 days the larvae emerge, killing the parasitized caterpillar. These newly emerged larvae spin cocoons in a cluster on or nearby the host caterpillar; after 7 to 10 days the imago adult wasps hatch from these cocoons. In the photo a larvae is emerging from the butterfly caterpillar and the previous ones are already pupate around the caterpillar body in silken cocoons. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393032

White butterfly parasite, Cotesia glomerata. Its a small (3-7mm)

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Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Underside of head detail showing the strong forcipules that it uses to inoculate the venom. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Underside of head detail showing the strong forcipules that it uses to inoculate the venom. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. PortugalMediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Underside of head detail showing the strong forcipules that it uses to inoculate the venom. It’s an opportunistic carnivore. It will attack and consume almost any animal that is not larger than itself. These include insects, worms, spiders and moths, and have been known to devour young mice and small lizards. The Scolopendra's main weapon is its bite, which paralyses its prey. It delivers a bite, which can cause inflammation and pain in the affected limb. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393031

Mediterranean banded centipede, Scolopendra cingulata. Underside

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Woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. Eating a woodlose. Woodlouse spiders hunt at night and do not spin webs. They spend the day in a silken retreat made to enclose crevices in, generally, partially decayed wood, but sometimes construct tent-like structures in indents of various large rocks. Their diet consists principally of woodlice which—despite their tough exoskeleton—are pierced easily by the spider's large chelicerae (fangs). They bite humans if handled but with no major medical problems. Localized itchiness at the bite site has been reported in some cases. PortugalWoodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. Eating a woodlose. Woodlouse spiders hunt at night and do not spin webs. They spend the day in a silken retreat made to enclose crevices in, generally, partially decayed wood, but sometimes construct tent-like structures in indents of various large rocks. Their diet consists principally of woodlice which—despite their tough exoskeleton—are pierced easily by the spider's large chelicerae (fangs). They bite humans if handled but with no major medical problems. Localized itchiness at the bite site has been reported in some cases. PortugalWoodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. Eating a woodlose. Woodlouse spiders hunt at night and do not spin webs. They spend the day in a silken retreat made to enclose crevices in, generally, partially decayed wood, but sometimes construct tent-like structures in indents of various large rocks. Their diet consists principally of woodlice which—despite their tough exoskeleton—are pierced easily by the spider's large chelicerae (fangs). They bite humans if handled but with no major medical problems. Localized itchiness at the bite site has been reported in some cases. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393029

Woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. Eating a woodlose. Woodlouse

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European garden spider, Araneus diadematus, on the web. The legs of orb-weaver spiders are specialized for spinning orb webs. The webs are built by the larger females who hang head down in the center of the web or remain hidden in nearby foliage, with one claw hooked to a signal line connected to the main orb waiting for a disturbance to signal the arrival of prey. Prey is then quickly bitten and wrapped in silk before being stored for later consumption. PortugalEuropean garden spider, Araneus diadematus, on the web. The legs of orb-weaver spiders are specialized for spinning orb webs. The webs are built by the larger females who hang head down in the center of the web or remain hidden in nearby foliage, with one claw hooked to a signal line connected to the main orb waiting for a disturbance to signal the arrival of prey. Prey is then quickly bitten and wrapped in silk before being stored for later consumption. PortugalEuropean garden spider, Araneus diadematus, on the web. The legs of orb-weaver spiders are specialized for spinning orb webs. The webs are built by the larger females who hang head down in the center of the web or remain hidden in nearby foliage, with one claw hooked to a signal line connected to the main orb waiting for a disturbance to signal the arrival of prey. Prey is then quickly bitten and wrapped in silk before being stored for later consumption. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393028

European garden spider, Araneus diadematus, on the web. The legs

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Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2303206

Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal

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Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2303191

Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal

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Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2303190

Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal

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Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2303189

Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal

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Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, PortugalUrsa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2303188

Ursa Beach at sunset, Cabo da Roca, Portugal

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Eurasian Crag Martin (Ptyonoprogne rupestris), PortugalEurasian Crag Martin (Ptyonoprogne rupestris), PortugalEurasian Crag Martin (Ptyonoprogne rupestris), Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171206

Eurasian Crag Martin (Ptyonoprogne rupestris), Portugal

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Garden snail (Helix aspersa) on leaf, PortugalGarden snail (Helix aspersa) on leaf, PortugalGarden snail (Helix aspersa) on leaf, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171205

Garden snail (Helix aspersa) on leaf, Portugal

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Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, PortugalEurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, PortugalEurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171204

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, Portugal

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Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, PortugalEurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, PortugalEurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171203

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) on rock, Portugal

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Road sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, PortugalRoad sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, PortugalRoad sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus) reintroduced, Mertola, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171202

Road sign announcing the presence of Spanish Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

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Purple viper's-bugloss (Echium plantagineum), PortugalPurple viper's-bugloss (Echium plantagineum), PortugalPurple viper's-bugloss (Echium plantagineum), Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171201

Purple viper's-bugloss (Echium plantagineum), Portugal

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White stork (Ciconia ciconia) at nest on electric pole, Cap Sardao, PortugalWhite stork (Ciconia ciconia) at nest on electric pole, Cap Sardao, PortugalWhite stork (Ciconia ciconia) at nest on electric pole, Cap Sardao, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171200

White stork (Ciconia ciconia) at nest on electric pole, Cap

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Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) on a branch, Faro, PortugalSardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) on a branch, Faro, PortugalSardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) on a branch, Faro, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171199

Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) on a branch, Faro,

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Striped snails (Cernuella sp), PortugalStriped snails (Cernuella sp), PortugalStriped snails (Cernuella sp), Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171198

Striped snails (Cernuella sp), Portugal

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Common Linnet (Linaria cannabina) female collecting materials for nesting, PortugalCommon Linnet (Linaria cannabina) female collecting materials for nesting, PortugalCommon Linnet (Linaria cannabina) female collecting materials for nesting, Portugal© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2171197

Common Linnet (Linaria cannabina) female collecting materials for

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