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Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic

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Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom

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Green turtle eating a plastic bag resembling a jellyfish , TenerifeGreen turtle eating a plastic bag resembling a jellyfish , TenerifeGreen turtle eating a plastic bag resembling a jellyfish , Tenerife© Sergi Garcia Fernandez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green turtle eating a plastic bag resembling a jellyfish ,

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Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a jellyfish. Shot made between 3 and 4 metres deep.© Sergi Garcia Fernandez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green sea turtle trying to eat a plastic bag. It looks like a

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros

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Photo complaint, garbage, plastic in the sea.Photo complaint, garbage, plastic in the sea.Photo complaint, garbage, plastic in the sea.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Photo complaint, garbage, plastic in the sea.

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Plastic bag floating between two waters, Cap d'Agde, Hérault, Occitanie, FrancePlastic bag floating between two waters, Cap d'Agde, Hérault, Occitanie, FrancePlastic bag floating between two waters, Cap d'Agde, Hérault, Occitanie, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Plastic bag floating between two waters, Cap d'Agde, Hérault,

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Multiplication of an orchid by tuft divisionMultiplication of an orchid by tuft divisionMultiplication of an orchid by tuft division© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Multiplication of an orchid by tuft division

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Tip for blooming a bromeliad: enclose it in a bag with a ripe apple.Tip for blooming a bromeliad: enclose it in a bag with a ripe apple.Tip for blooming a bromeliad: enclose it in a bag with a ripe apple.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tip for blooming a bromeliad: enclose it in a bag with a ripe

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Gold barbs (Barbodes semifasciolatus) waiting to be released in aquariumGold barbs (Barbodes semifasciolatus) waiting to be released in aquariumGold barbs (Barbodes semifasciolatus) waiting to be released in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Gold barbs (Barbodes semifasciolatus) waiting to be released in

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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It looks like a plastic bag floating in the ocean, a transparent chunk of skin from a sperm whale. It get rubbed off when they socialise and groom each other by rubbing their massive bodies together. Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Image has been shot in Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.It looks like a plastic bag floating in the ocean, a transparent chunk of skin from a sperm whale. It get rubbed off when they socialise and groom each other by rubbing their massive bodies together. Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Image has been shot in Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.It looks like a plastic bag floating in the ocean, a transparent chunk of skin from a sperm whale. It get rubbed off when they socialise and groom each other by rubbing their massive bodies together. Vulnerable (IUCN). The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales. Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 1,000 meters in search of squid to eat. Image has been shot in Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Photo taken under permit n°RP 16-02/32 FIS-5.© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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It looks like a plastic bag floating in the ocean, a transparent

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Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, Greece© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) with a plastic bag in the

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, MexicoYellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag in the beak, remains of food waste, Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Loreto, Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, Mexico© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Yellow-footed gull ( Larus livens) in flight with a plastic bag

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Employees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. PortugalEmployees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. PortugalEmployees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Employees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line.

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Employees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET (polyethylene terephthalate) objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. PortugalEmployees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET (polyethylene terephthalate) objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. PortugalEmployees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line. Manual sorting of plastic to to separate non-recyclable plastic PET (polyethylene terephthalate) objects. Some qualities of plastics can not be recycled and should be incinerated. PETs used in water bottles and juices instead can be recycled, for example, into garment fabrics. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Employees of a waste facility on a conveyor belt sorting line.

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Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401765

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401764

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401763

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401762

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401761

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401760

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401759

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

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Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401758

Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge

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Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401757

Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in

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Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401756

Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the

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Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageYellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397560

Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares eating a styrofoam cup.

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Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite imageTitan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic bottle. Caribbean Sea - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397559

Titan triggerfish (Balistoides viridescens) eating a plastic

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397557

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic bags and other platic garbage. Tailand - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397556

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding in the midle of plastic

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Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite imageWhale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian Ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397555

Whale shark (Rhincodon typus) feeding near plastic bags. Indian

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Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes cyanophrys), inside a plastic bag drifting in the ocean. These fish are often associated with sargassum weeds and jellyfish to protect themselves from predators. But in this case the protection is provided by a piece of garbage produced by man. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397553

Plastic bag accompanied by a juvenile Freckled Driftfish (Psenes

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Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young drift fish. Contrast between a piece of hazardous waste and healthy nature. Concept image. Azores - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397552

Plastic bag and a Mauve Stinger (Pelagia noctiluca), with a young

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Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite imagePlastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). These fish as young people usually protect themselves from predators by hiding among the stinging tentacles of jellyfish. But in this case the plastic bag does not guarantee them any protection. Portugal - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397551

Plastic bag accompanied by two young horse mackerel (Trachurus

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Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. Azores© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397550

Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397549

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite imageAtlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden in the middle of floating trash. Adults are often found near the surface over deep, open water, although always associated with floating objects or Sargasso. Atlantic ocean offshore Madeira - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397548

Atlantic tripletail or tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis), hidden

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Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397543

Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is

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Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite imageSea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is one of its natural foods. Atlantic ocean - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397541

Sea turtle swallowing a plastic bag much like a jellyfish that is

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