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Pelagic shrimp on a Mauve stinger jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca) photographed at night above the abyssal bottom. Tahiti French PolynesiaPelagic shrimp on a Mauve stinger jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca) photographed at night above the abyssal bottom. Tahiti French PolynesiaPelagic shrimp on a Mauve stinger jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca) photographed at night above the abyssal bottom. Tahiti French Polynesia© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pelagic shrimp on a Mauve stinger jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca)

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Juvenile jack taking refuge in a purple jellyfish (Thysanostoma loriferum). Photographed at night over abyssal depths Tahiti, French Polynesia. Award-winning image.Juvenile jack taking refuge in a purple jellyfish (Thysanostoma loriferum). Photographed at night over abyssal depths Tahiti, French Polynesia. Award-winning image.Juvenile jack taking refuge in a purple jellyfish (Thysanostoma loriferum). Photographed at night over abyssal depths Tahiti, French Polynesia. Award-winning image.© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Juvenile jack taking refuge in a purple jellyfish (Thysanostoma

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Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) photographed using a photo-trapping technique in Chiapas, MexicoCommon Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) photographed using a photo-trapping technique in Chiapas, MexicoCommon Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) photographed using a photo-trapping technique in Chiapas, Mexico© Jorge Figueroa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) photographed using a

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extremely rare photograph of a larval Flabby whalefish, a cetomimiform fish of the family Cetomimidae. They are among the most deep-living fish known. Photgraphed during a blackwater dive at 95 feet with the bottom 650 feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceanextremely rare photograph of a larval Flabby whalefish, a cetomimiform fish of the family Cetomimidae. They are among the most deep-living fish known. Photgraphed during a blackwater dive at 95 feet with the bottom 650 feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Oceanextremely rare photograph of a larval Flabby whalefish, a cetomimiform fish of the family Cetomimidae. They are among the most deep-living fish known. Photgraphed during a blackwater dive at 95 feet with the bottom 650 feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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extremely rare photograph of a larval Flabby whalefish, a

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This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed during a 10 days monitoring, following a local guide and a scientist. The day before this picture we saw individuals in this part of the fig tree. The next day we installed flashs in and outside the tree before that theses individuals start their activities in order to limit the disturbance. After a long wait this young came on the right place and i could only take few shots before they leaved the tree to hunt during the night.
 Highly commended at Asferico 2018.© Quentin Martinez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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This young Tarsius (Tarsius tarsier complex) was photographed

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African Elephant drinking in the Chobe river - Botswana ; Photographed from a boat. African Elephant drinking in the Chobe river - BotswanaAfrican Elephant drinking in the Chobe river - Botswana ; Photographed from a boat. © Thomas Dressler / BiosphotoJPG - RMExclusive sale possible

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African Elephant drinking in the Chobe river - Botswana ;

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Portrait of Hippopotamus in Chobe river - Botswana ; Photographed from a boatPortrait of Hippopotamus in Chobe river - BotswanaPortrait of Hippopotamus in Chobe river - Botswana ; Photographed from a boat© Thomas Dressler / BiosphotoJPG - RMExclusive sale possible

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Portrait of Hippopotamus in Chobe river - Botswana ; Photographed

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Lemon Shark (Negaprion brevirostris) being photographed by a diver on a boat at Tiger Beach; a popular shark diving spot on Little Bahama Bank in the Northern Caribbean.Lemon Shark (Negaprion brevirostris) being photographed by a diver on a boat at Tiger Beach; a popular shark diving spot on Little Bahama Bank in the Northern Caribbean.Lemon Shark (Negaprion brevirostris) being photographed by a diver on a boat at Tiger Beach; a popular shark diving spot on Little Bahama Bank in the Northern Caribbean.© Andy Murch / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Lemon Shark (Negaprion brevirostris) being photographed by a

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first ever photograph in the wild of the Telescope fish, Gigantura chuni, an extremely deep water species. The larvae look nothing like the adults as a tremendous metamorphisis takes place during development. Photographed at 50 feet in 600 plus foot depths. Blackwater dive off Palm Beach, Florida. Atlantic Ocean.first ever photograph in the wild of the Telescope fish, Gigantura chuni, an extremely deep water species. The larvae look nothing like the adults as a tremendous metamorphisis takes place during development. Photographed at 50 feet in 600 plus foot depths. Blackwater dive off Palm Beach, Florida. Atlantic Ocean.first ever photograph in the wild of the Telescope fish, Gigantura chuni, an extremely deep water species. The larvae look nothing like the adults as a tremendous metamorphisis takes place during development. Photographed at 50 feet in 600 plus foot depths. Blackwater dive off Palm Beach, Florida. Atlantic Ocean.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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first ever photograph in the wild of the Telescope fish,

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Skunk Clownfish (Amphiprion akallopisos) surprised to be photographed, MayotteSkunk Clownfish (Amphiprion akallopisos) surprised to be photographed, MayotteSkunk Clownfish (Amphiprion akallopisos) surprised to be photographed, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Skunk Clownfish (Amphiprion akallopisos) surprised to be

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Night photography of basalt arch on the Iron island, Las Puntas la Frontera Tenerife, SpainNight photography of basalt arch on the Iron island, Las Puntas la Frontera Tenerife, SpainNight photography of basalt arch on the Iron island, Las Puntas la Frontera Tenerife, Spain© David Jerez / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Night photography of basalt arch on the Iron island, Las Puntas

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Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, MayotteDivers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on one of the many white corals which is between the second and the third reef wall to 80 meters deep, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Divers photographer, Olivier in full session of photography on

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Lyretail hogfish (Bodianus anthioides) juvenile photographed at 70 meters depth, MayotteLyretail hogfish (Bodianus anthioides) juvenile photographed at 70 meters depth, MayotteLyretail hogfish (Bodianus anthioides) juvenile photographed at 70 meters depth, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Lyretail hogfish (Bodianus anthioides) juvenile photographed at

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Observatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, FinlandObservatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, FinlandObservatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, Finland© Alain Roux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Observatories for the observation and photography of brown bears

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Observatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, FinlandObservatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, FinlandObservatories for the observation and photography of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near a peat bog in Suomussalmi, Finland© Alain Roux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Observatories for the observation and photography of brown bears

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An antipatharian whip coral and its goby photographed at a depth of 76 meters. Are these the same specimens found in shallow depths?An antipatharian whip coral and its goby photographed at a depth of 76 meters. Are these the same specimens found in shallow depths?An antipatharian whip coral and its goby photographed at a depth of 76 meters. Are these the same specimens found in shallow depths?© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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An antipatharian whip coral and its goby photographed at a depth

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/TaraexpeditionsTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/TaraexpeditionsTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/Taraexpeditions© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods.

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Spider crab (Chirostylus ortmanni) from the mesophotic zone in its coral. Specimen having an egg glued to its tail photographed in the Sanctutum cave by 70 m depth. MayotteSpider crab (Chirostylus ortmanni) from the mesophotic zone in its coral. Specimen having an egg glued to its tail photographed in the Sanctutum cave by 70 m depth. MayotteSpider crab (Chirostylus ortmanni) from the mesophotic zone in its coral. Specimen having an egg glued to its tail photographed in the Sanctutum cave by 70 m depth. Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spider crab (Chirostylus ortmanni) from the mesophotic zone in

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Pastel tilefish (Hoplolatilus fronticinctus) couple of tilefish photographed at 85 meters. They have the distinction of being builders. Indeed, he builds their nests with debris of corals and shellfish, as we can see in this picture. This one is small. MayottePastel tilefish (Hoplolatilus fronticinctus) couple of tilefish photographed at 85 meters. They have the distinction of being builders. Indeed, he builds their nests with debris of corals and shellfish, as we can see in this picture. This one is small. MayottePastel tilefish (Hoplolatilus fronticinctus) couple of tilefish photographed at 85 meters. They have the distinction of being builders. Indeed, he builds their nests with debris of corals and shellfish, as we can see in this picture. This one is small. Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pastel tilefish (Hoplolatilus fronticinctus) couple of tilefish

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407994

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Tétra cuivré (Hasemania nana). Poisson mâle de profil photographié en aquariumTétra cuivré (Hasemania nana). Poisson mâle de profil photographié en aquariumTétra cuivré (Hasemania nana). Poisson mâle de profil photographié en aquarium© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406375

Tétra cuivré (Hasemania nana). Poisson mâle de profil

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Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. AzoresConcept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic garbage. Plastic bag photographed with a fisheye lens against the surface. Azores© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2397550

Concept image allusive to a blue planet invaded by plastic

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Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396689

Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal

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Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite imageTrachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal photographed at night close to surface. These fish reach 3 meters length and live from 100 to 600 meters deep. They feed on squids and midwater fishes. They are seen very often swimming with head up. Mediterranean, Spain.. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2396688

Trachipterus trachypterus, Mediterranean dealfish. Young animal

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Lion (Panthera leo) walking straight to the camera, Tsavo National Park, KenyaLion (Panthera leo) walking straight to the camera, Tsavo National Park, KenyaLion (Panthera leo) walking straight to the camera, Tsavo National Park, Kenya© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2315335

Lion (Panthera leo) walking straight to the camera, Tsavo

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