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Spotted hyenaes (Crocuta crocuta) and vultures on a carcass of a buffalo in Masai Mara KenyaSpotted hyenaes (Crocuta crocuta) and vultures on a carcass of a buffalo in Masai Mara KenyaSpotted hyenaes (Crocuta crocuta) and vultures on a carcass of a buffalo in Masai Mara Kenya© Christophe Ravier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Spotted hyenaes (Crocuta crocuta) and vultures on a carcass of a

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Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) group in flight against a blue sky near a mass grave, SpainGriffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) group in flight against a blue sky near a mass grave, SpainGriffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) group in flight against a blue sky near a mass grave, Spain© Jean Mayet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) group in flight against a blue sky

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Lappet faced (Torgos tracheliotos) and white backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) isolated on white in Kruger National park, South AfricaLappet faced (Torgos tracheliotos) and white backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) isolated on white in Kruger National park, South AfricaLappet faced (Torgos tracheliotos) and white backed Vultures (Gyps africanus) isolated on white in Kruger National park, South Africa© Patrice Correia / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Lappet faced (Torgos tracheliotos) and white backed Vultures

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Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park,

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Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park, Aosta Valley, Italy.© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Gran Paradiso National Park,

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Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal

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A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.

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Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.

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A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous

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Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with

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Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid

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Squid-like Orthoceratites (genus Orthoceras) attempt to make meals of trilobites of the species Asaphus kowalewskii at the bottom of an Ordovician sea 480 million years ago. Also featured is a sea star (AKA starfish), an echinoderm of the class Asteroidea; palm-like Crinoids (AKA sea lilies); Rugosa (AKA Tetracoralla); Favistina stellata coral; and Vauxia sponges.Squid-like Orthoceratites (genus Orthoceras) attempt to make meals of trilobites of the species Asaphus kowalewskii at the bottom of an Ordovician sea 480 million years ago. Also featured is a sea star (AKA starfish), an echinoderm of the class Asteroidea; palm-like Crinoids (AKA sea lilies); Rugosa (AKA Tetracoralla); Favistina stellata coral; and Vauxia sponges.Squid-like Orthoceratites (genus Orthoceras) attempt to make meals of trilobites of the species Asaphus kowalewskii at the bottom of an Ordovician sea 480 million years ago. Also featured is a sea star (AKA starfish), an echinoderm of the class Asteroidea; palm-like Crinoids (AKA sea lilies); Rugosa (AKA Tetracoralla); Favistina stellata coral; and Vauxia sponges.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Squid-like Orthoceratites (genus Orthoceras) attempt to make

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A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the

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An 8-inch-long primitive jawless fish of the species Drepanaspis gemuendenensis settles on the bottom of a shallow Devonian sea 380 million years ago. With a flat, paddle-shaped head and upwards-facing jawless mouth, Drepanaspis was one of the more unique sea creatures of its time. Based upon its overall shape it is believed to have been a bottom feeder, though it's not known what it would have eaten.An 8-inch-long primitive jawless fish of the species Drepanaspis gemuendenensis settles on the bottom of a shallow Devonian sea 380 million years ago. With a flat, paddle-shaped head and upwards-facing jawless mouth, Drepanaspis was one of the more unique sea creatures of its time. Based upon its overall shape it is believed to have been a bottom feeder, though it's not known what it would have eaten.An 8-inch-long primitive jawless fish of the species Drepanaspis gemuendenensis settles on the bottom of a shallow Devonian sea 380 million years ago. With a flat, paddle-shaped head and upwards-facing jawless mouth, Drepanaspis was one of the more unique sea creatures of its time. Based upon its overall shape it is believed to have been a bottom feeder, though it's not known what it would have eaten.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An 8-inch-long primitive jawless fish of the species Drepanaspis

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A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a

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Species from the genus Anhanguera soar 105 million years ago over what is today Brazil. Anhanguera was a flying reptile with a wingspan of 15 feet, larger than any modern bird. Its diet is believed to have consisted primarily of fish.Species from the genus Anhanguera soar 105 million years ago over what is today Brazil. Anhanguera was a flying reptile with a wingspan of 15 feet, larger than any modern bird. Its diet is believed to have consisted primarily of fish.Species from the genus Anhanguera soar 105 million years ago over what is today Brazil. Anhanguera was a flying reptile with a wingspan of 15 feet, larger than any modern bird. Its diet is believed to have consisted primarily of fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Species from the genus Anhanguera soar 105 million years ago over

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Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago

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A pair of Andean Condors, male and female, fly over a village in the Amazon basin 1,700 years ago. The Andean Condor is a large vulture whose range includes the Andes mountains and Pacific coasts of western South America. With a wingspan of over 10 feet and weighing up to 30 pounds, it is the largest flying land bird in the Western Hemisphere. Like all vultures, the Andean Condor is a scavenger feeding mainly on carrion.A pair of Andean Condors, male and female, fly over a village in the Amazon basin 1,700 years ago. The Andean Condor is a large vulture whose range includes the Andes mountains and Pacific coasts of western South America. With a wingspan of over 10 feet and weighing up to 30 pounds, it is the largest flying land bird in the Western Hemisphere. Like all vultures, the Andean Condor is a scavenger feeding mainly on carrion.A pair of Andean Condors, male and female, fly over a village in the Amazon basin 1,700 years ago. The Andean Condor is a large vulture whose range includes the Andes mountains and Pacific coasts of western South America. With a wingspan of over 10 feet and weighing up to 30 pounds, it is the largest flying land bird in the Western Hemisphere. Like all vultures, the Andean Condor is a scavenger feeding mainly on carrion.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A pair of Andean Condors, male and female, fly over a village in

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A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million

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A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush

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A pterosaur flying reptile lands next to some carrion. Pterosaurs, which lived 220 to 65 million years ago, were the first vertebrates to evolve powered flight. It is thought that the vertical crest on the head kept them stable while flying.A pterosaur flying reptile lands next to some carrion. Pterosaurs, which lived 220 to 65 million years ago, were the first vertebrates to evolve powered flight. It is thought that the vertical crest on the head kept them stable while flying.A pterosaur flying reptile lands next to some carrion. Pterosaurs, which lived 220 to 65 million years ago, were the first vertebrates to evolve powered flight. It is thought that the vertical crest on the head kept them stable while flying.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A pterosaur flying reptile lands next to some carrion.

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Fanged Enchodus, six-foot-long predatory fish from the late Cretaceous period about 75 million years ago, swim in a estuary in the Western Interior Seaway of North America. On the shore to the right are duck-billed Hadrosaurs and on the left are a pair of ostrich-like Struthiomimus. In the center a flock of feathered Ichthyornis take to the air. . During the mid to late Cretaceous the continent of North America was divided by waters from the Arctic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Also known as the Cretaceous Seaway, the Niobraran Sea, and the North American Inland Sea, much of the North American Midwest was under water for about 30 million years. In some places the water may have been as deep as 3,000 feet.Fanged Enchodus, six-foot-long predatory fish from the late Cretaceous period about 75 million years ago, swim in a estuary in the Western Interior Seaway of North America. On the shore to the right are duck-billed Hadrosaurs and on the left are a pair of ostrich-like Struthiomimus. In the center a flock of feathered Ichthyornis take to the air. . During the mid to late Cretaceous the continent of North America was divided by waters from the Arctic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Also known as the Cretaceous Seaway, the Niobraran Sea, and the North American Inland Sea, much of the North American Midwest was under water for about 30 million years. In some places the water may have been as deep as 3,000 feet.Fanged Enchodus, six-foot-long predatory fish from the late Cretaceous period about 75 million years ago, swim in a estuary in the Western Interior Seaway of North America. On the shore to the right are duck-billed Hadrosaurs and on the left are a pair of ostrich-like Struthiomimus. In the center a flock of feathered Ichthyornis take to the air. . During the mid to late Cretaceous the continent of North America was divided by waters from the Arctic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Also known as the Cretaceous Seaway, the Niobraran Sea, and the North American Inland Sea, much of the North American Midwest was under water for about 30 million years. In some places the water may have been as deep as 3,000 feet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Fanged Enchodus, six-foot-long predatory fish from the late

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A pair of 40-foot-long Elasmosaurus engage in a swimming courtship dance in a secluded pool 80 million years ago in what is today North America. The gull-like birds are Ichthyornis, the Cretaceous ecological equivalent of modern seabirds such as gulls, petrels, and skimmers. . At over two tons, Elasmosaurus was an air-breathing carnivorous reptile with flippers for limbs and a relatively small head with sharp teeth. More than half of its length was neck which had more than 70 vertebrae, more than any other animal.A pair of 40-foot-long Elasmosaurus engage in a swimming courtship dance in a secluded pool 80 million years ago in what is today North America. The gull-like birds are Ichthyornis, the Cretaceous ecological equivalent of modern seabirds such as gulls, petrels, and skimmers. . At over two tons, Elasmosaurus was an air-breathing carnivorous reptile with flippers for limbs and a relatively small head with sharp teeth. More than half of its length was neck which had more than 70 vertebrae, more than any other animal.A pair of 40-foot-long Elasmosaurus engage in a swimming courtship dance in a secluded pool 80 million years ago in what is today North America. The gull-like birds are Ichthyornis, the Cretaceous ecological equivalent of modern seabirds such as gulls, petrels, and skimmers. . At over two tons, Elasmosaurus was an air-breathing carnivorous reptile with flippers for limbs and a relatively small head with sharp teeth. More than half of its length was neck which had more than 70 vertebrae, more than any other animal.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A pair of 40-foot-long Elasmosaurus engage in a swimming

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A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later.
A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is

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A flock of Dorygnathus soars high over a rugged, Early Jurassic European landscape of Wollemi Pine approximately 180 million years ago. . Dorygnathus had a wing span of about 3 feet and its large, curved fangs suggests that it dined primarily on fish. Like all pterosaurs, Dorygnathus was a flying reptile, not a dinosaur (the flying descendents of the dinosaurs live on today as birds).A flock of Dorygnathus soars high over a rugged, Early Jurassic European landscape of Wollemi Pine approximately 180 million years ago. . Dorygnathus had a wing span of about 3 feet and its large, curved fangs suggests that it dined primarily on fish. Like all pterosaurs, Dorygnathus was a flying reptile, not a dinosaur (the flying descendents of the dinosaurs live on today as birds).A flock of Dorygnathus soars high over a rugged, Early Jurassic European landscape of Wollemi Pine approximately 180 million years ago. . Dorygnathus had a wing span of about 3 feet and its large, curved fangs suggests that it dined primarily on fish. Like all pterosaurs, Dorygnathus was a flying reptile, not a dinosaur (the flying descendents of the dinosaurs live on today as birds).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A flock of Dorygnathus soars high over a rugged, Early Jurassic

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Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls

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A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479027

2479027

A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from

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Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479026

2479026

Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys

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A hungry, carnivorous Dilophosaurus hunts for her next meal in a valley forest of Ginkgos. The Ginkgo first emerged 270 million years ago and it is the oldest species of tree still living today, a living fossil. It has no close living relatives. The Ginkgo is very tolerant of extreme conditions including manmade pollutants, which ironically makes this primeval plant well-suited for today's urban environments.A hungry, carnivorous Dilophosaurus hunts for her next meal in a valley forest of Ginkgos. The Ginkgo first emerged 270 million years ago and it is the oldest species of tree still living today, a living fossil. It has no close living relatives. The Ginkgo is very tolerant of extreme conditions including manmade pollutants, which ironically makes this primeval plant well-suited for today's urban environments.A hungry, carnivorous Dilophosaurus hunts for her next meal in a valley forest of Ginkgos. The Ginkgo first emerged 270 million years ago and it is the oldest species of tree still living today, a living fossil. It has no close living relatives. The Ginkgo is very tolerant of extreme conditions including manmade pollutants, which ironically makes this primeval plant well-suited for today's urban environments.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479025

2479025

A hungry, carnivorous Dilophosaurus hunts for her next meal in a

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A colorful adult male Dilophosaurus explores a hilltop that is host to Williamsonia gigas, Sago Palms, and ferns. The tree-like Williamsonia gigas was a seed plant belonging to the order of Bennettitales and reigned for 130 million years before becoming extinct. Williamsonia gigas produced what appears to be large flowers, which were really a group of seeds surrounded by a crown of leaf-like structures known as bracteae. True flowers didn't begin to dominate the landscape until relatively recently, about 50 million years ago. The 0ther flora illustrated here live to this day, including the coniferous Araucaria, ferns, and Sago Palms (which in reality are not palms but a type of gymnosperm). . The first known predatory dinosaur appeared 190 million years ago during the early Jurassic period. Christened Dilophosaurus (meaning two-crested lizard, because it had a pair of distinctive bony crests on its head) this bipedal saurischian grew up to 20 feet long, stood 8 feet tall, and weighed as much as a half ton. Dilophosaurus roamed the Earth 100 million years before its larger and more celebrated cousin Tyrannosaurus Rex roared onto the scene.A colorful adult male Dilophosaurus explores a hilltop that is host to Williamsonia gigas, Sago Palms, and ferns. The tree-like Williamsonia gigas was a seed plant belonging to the order of Bennettitales and reigned for 130 million years before becoming extinct. Williamsonia gigas produced what appears to be large flowers, which were really a group of seeds surrounded by a crown of leaf-like structures known as bracteae. True flowers didn't begin to dominate the landscape until relatively recently, about 50 million years ago. The 0ther flora illustrated here live to this day, including the coniferous Araucaria, ferns, and Sago Palms (which in reality are not palms but a type of gymnosperm). . The first known predatory dinosaur appeared 190 million years ago during the early Jurassic period. Christened Dilophosaurus (meaning two-crested lizard, because it had a pair of distinctive bony crests on its head) this bipedal saurischian grew up to 20 feet long, stood 8 feet tall, and weighed as much as a half ton. Dilophosaurus roamed the Earth 100 million years before its larger and more celebrated cousin Tyrannosaurus Rex roared onto the scene.A colorful adult male Dilophosaurus explores a hilltop that is host to Williamsonia gigas, Sago Palms, and ferns. The tree-like Williamsonia gigas was a seed plant belonging to the order of Bennettitales and reigned for 130 million years before becoming extinct. Williamsonia gigas produced what appears to be large flowers, which were really a group of seeds surrounded by a crown of leaf-like structures known as bracteae. True flowers didn't begin to dominate the landscape until relatively recently, about 50 million years ago. The 0ther flora illustrated here live to this day, including the coniferous Araucaria, ferns, and Sago Palms (which in reality are not palms but a type of gymnosperm). . The first known predatory dinosaur appeared 190 million years ago during the early Jurassic period. Christened Dilophosaurus (meaning two-crested lizard, because it had a pair of distinctive bony crests on its head) this bipedal saurischian grew up to 20 feet long, stood 8 feet tall, and weighed as much as a half ton. Dilophosaurus roamed the Earth 100 million years before its larger and more celebrated cousin Tyrannosaurus Rex roared onto the scene.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479024

2479024

A colorful adult male Dilophosaurus explores a hilltop that is

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Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479021

2479021

Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus

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A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479020

2479020

A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs

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Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479019

2479019

Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the

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Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the ocean waters of the Western Interior Seaway of North America 75 million years ago. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot long Mosasaur.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479018

2479018

Artist's concept of primary marine predators that shared the

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What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479017

2479017

What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar

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A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479016

2479016

A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has

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A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479015

2479015

A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150

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Three carnivorous Coelophysis, one male and two females, walk amongst a forest of prehistoric Araucaria evergreens. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaurs, emerging about 215 million years ago during the late Triassic period. It stood only as tall as a man's hip and probably was a fast runner.Three carnivorous Coelophysis, one male and two females, walk amongst a forest of prehistoric Araucaria evergreens. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaurs, emerging about 215 million years ago during the late Triassic period. It stood only as tall as a man's hip and probably was a fast runner.Three carnivorous Coelophysis, one male and two females, walk amongst a forest of prehistoric Araucaria evergreens. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaurs, emerging about 215 million years ago during the late Triassic period. It stood only as tall as a man's hip and probably was a fast runner.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479010

2479010

Three carnivorous Coelophysis, one male and two females, walk

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During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. 
During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479009

2479009

During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical

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An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479008

2479008

An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic

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A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479007

2479007

A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a

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Resembling modern flowers, species of the genus Dinomischus populate the ocean floor about 505 million years ago. About four inches tall, Dinomischus was an animal permanently attached to the ocean floor by a stalk. It probably fed by filtering the surrounding seawater for nutrients, and may have created a current to facilitate this. Its mouth and anus were positioned side-by-side.Resembling modern flowers, species of the genus Dinomischus populate the ocean floor about 505 million years ago. About four inches tall, Dinomischus was an animal permanently attached to the ocean floor by a stalk. It probably fed by filtering the surrounding seawater for nutrients, and may have created a current to facilitate this. Its mouth and anus were positioned side-by-side.Resembling modern flowers, species of the genus Dinomischus populate the ocean floor about 505 million years ago. About four inches tall, Dinomischus was an animal permanently attached to the ocean floor by a stalk. It probably fed by filtering the surrounding seawater for nutrients, and may have created a current to facilitate this. Its mouth and anus were positioned side-by-side.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478999

2478999

Resembling modern flowers, species of the genus Dinomischus

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An Anomalocaris explores a Middle Cambrian ocean floor about 500 million years ago. Growing to over three feet long, Anomalocaris is believed to have been a predator whose diet included trilobites. Anomalocaris may have also been one of the earliest arthropods. . . This image includes an Olenoides serratus trilobite and sponges genus Vauxia and Wapkia. The small, flower-like animals (yes, like the sponges they are rooted animals) are from the genus Dinomischus. Above and behind the Anomalocaris is an ancient jellyfish.An Anomalocaris explores a Middle Cambrian ocean floor about 500 million years ago. Growing to over three feet long, Anomalocaris is believed to have been a predator whose diet included trilobites. Anomalocaris may have also been one of the earliest arthropods. . . This image includes an Olenoides serratus trilobite and sponges genus Vauxia and Wapkia. The small, flower-like animals (yes, like the sponges they are rooted animals) are from the genus Dinomischus. Above and behind the Anomalocaris is an ancient jellyfish.An Anomalocaris explores a Middle Cambrian ocean floor about 500 million years ago. Growing to over three feet long, Anomalocaris is believed to have been a predator whose diet included trilobites. Anomalocaris may have also been one of the earliest arthropods. . . This image includes an Olenoides serratus trilobite and sponges genus Vauxia and Wapkia. The small, flower-like animals (yes, like the sponges they are rooted animals) are from the genus Dinomischus. Above and behind the Anomalocaris is an ancient jellyfish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478979

2478979

An Anomalocaris explores a Middle Cambrian ocean floor about 500

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Baryonyx swimming amongst some Lepidotes fish.Baryonyx swimming amongst some Lepidotes fish.Baryonyx swimming amongst some Lepidotes fish.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478973

2478973

Baryonyx swimming amongst some Lepidotes fish.

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Darwinopterus, a pterosaur from the Jurassic period, linked between rhamphorhynchoids and pterodactyloids.Darwinopterus, a pterosaur from the Jurassic period, linked between rhamphorhynchoids and pterodactyloids.Darwinopterus, a pterosaur from the Jurassic period, linked between rhamphorhynchoids and pterodactyloids.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478965

2478965

Darwinopterus, a pterosaur from the Jurassic period, linked

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A Spinosaurus catches a young Stomatosuchus.A Spinosaurus catches a young Stomatosuchus.A Spinosaurus catches a young Stomatosuchus.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478956

2478956

A Spinosaurus catches a young Stomatosuchus.

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Andrewsarchus, an ungulate mammal from the Eocene epoch.Andrewsarchus, an ungulate mammal from the Eocene epoch.Andrewsarchus, an ungulate mammal from the Eocene epoch.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478943

2478943

Andrewsarchus, an ungulate mammal from the Eocene epoch.

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Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478870

2478870

Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped

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Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478832

2478832

Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.

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Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478831

2478831

Archaeopteryx dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.

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