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The crater of Teneguia, Island of La Palma, in the Canaries. Lenticular cloud over the Taburiente caldera - Seen from a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La PalmaThe crater of Teneguia, Island of La Palma, in the Canaries. Lenticular cloud over the Taburiente caldera - Seen from a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La PalmaThe crater of Teneguia, Island of La Palma, in the Canaries. Lenticular cloud over the Taburiente caldera - Seen from a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La Palma© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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The crater of Teneguia, Island of La Palma, in the Canaries.

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Canary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary IslandsCanary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary IslandsCanary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary Islands© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands.

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Canary pines in the crater of Teneguia (Island of La Palma. The Canary pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like here a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La PalmaCanary pines in the crater of Teneguia (Island of La Palma. The Canary pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like here a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La PalmaCanary pines in the crater of Teneguia (Island of La Palma. The Canary pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like here a crater whose eruption dates from 1971 - Natural Monument of Teneguia Volcanoes - La Palma© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines in the crater of Teneguia (Island of La Palma. The

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Canary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary IslandsCanary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary IslandsCanary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary Islands© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the

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Canary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary IslandsCanary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary IslandsCanary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the Canaries. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils like those of the Taburiente caldera on the island of La Palma - Taburiente National Park - Canary Islands© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines in the Taburiente caldera, Island of La Palma in the

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Canary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary IslandsCanary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary IslandsCanary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils - Parque Natural de Cumbre Vieja- La Palma- Canary Islands© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines on volcanic rocks, La Palma Island, Canary Islands.

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Canary pines after fire on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.Canary pines after fire on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.Canary pines after fire on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pines after fire on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island

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Canary pine bark on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.Canary pine bark on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.Canary pine bark on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis) is a magnificent endemic species of the archipelago, very resistant to fire and colonizing bare volcanic soils. Its very thick bark allows it to fully regenerate in a few years after a fire.© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Canary pine bark on the island of El Herrio. Canary Island pine

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Scrub Oak (Quercus berberidifolia) sprouting after a fire in a scrub oak chaparral plant community. Many annual plants also sprout in this recovery period, producing seeds which will lie dormant in the soil until the next fire. A common fire follower is California Manroot (Mara fabaceus), seen growing around the base of the nearest scrub oak.Scrub Oak (Quercus berberidifolia) sprouting after a fire in a scrub oak chaparral plant community. Many annual plants also sprout in this recovery period, producing seeds which will lie dormant in the soil until the next fire. A common fire follower is California Manroot (Mara fabaceus), seen growing around the base of the nearest scrub oak.Scrub Oak (Quercus berberidifolia) sprouting after a fire in a scrub oak chaparral plant community. Many annual plants also sprout in this recovery period, producing seeds which will lie dormant in the soil until the next fire. A common fire follower is California Manroot (Mara fabaceus), seen growing around the base of the nearest scrub oak.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Scrub Oak (Quercus berberidifolia) sprouting after a fire in a

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Place called 'Fond Pignon', Cap Blanc-nez, Mont d'Hubert, Hauts de FrancePlace called 'Fond Pignon', Cap Blanc-nez, Mont d'Hubert, Hauts de FrancePlace called 'Fond Pignon', Cap Blanc-nez, Mont d'Hubert, Hauts de France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Place called 'Fond Pignon', Cap Blanc-nez, Mont d'Hubert, Hauts

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Abandoned sandpit, Vosges du Nord Regional Natural Park, FranceAbandoned sandpit, Vosges du Nord Regional Natural Park, FranceAbandoned sandpit, Vosges du Nord Regional Natural Park, France© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Abandoned sandpit, Vosges du Nord Regional Natural Park, France

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Red-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaRed-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaRed-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) on a branch, Costanera

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Checkered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaCheckered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaCheckered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Checkered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera

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Green-barred Woodpecker (Colaptes melanochloros) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGreen-barred Woodpecker (Colaptes melanochloros) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGreen-barred Woodpecker (Colaptes melanochloros) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green-barred Woodpecker (Colaptes melanochloros) on a branch,

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Mangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva hilaris), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva hilaris), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva hilaris), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Mangrove Buckeye (Junonia genoveva hilaris), Costanera Sur

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Bella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaBella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaBella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae),

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Bella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae) in burrow, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaBella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae) in burrow, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaBella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae) in burrow, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bella Vista Toad or Sapo cavador (Rhinella fernandezae) in

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Checkered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaCheckered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaCheckered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Checkered Woodpecker (Veniliornis mixtus) on a branch, Costanera

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Tropical Parula (Setophaga pitiayumi) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaTropical Parula (Setophaga pitiayumi) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaTropical Parula (Setophaga pitiayumi) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tropical Parula (Setophaga pitiayumi) on a branch, Costanera Sur

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGuira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological

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Masked Gnatcatcher (Polioptila dumicola) female on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMasked Gnatcatcher (Polioptila dumicola) female on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaMasked Gnatcatcher (Polioptila dumicola) female on a branch, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Masked Gnatcatcher (Polioptila dumicola) female on a branch,

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Greyish Baywing (Agelaioides badius), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGreyish Baywing (Agelaioides badius), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaGreyish Baywing (Agelaioides badius), Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Greyish Baywing (Agelaioides badius), Costanera Sur Ecological

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Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) on ground, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaRufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) on ground, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaRufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) on ground, Costanera Sur Ecological Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) on ground, Costanera Sur

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Roots of Tetrameles (Tetrameles nudiflora) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, CambodiaRoots of Tetrameles (Tetrameles nudiflora) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, CambodiaRoots of Tetrameles (Tetrameles nudiflora) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, Cambodia© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Roots of Tetrameles (Tetrameles nudiflora) on the archaeological

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Council tree (Ficus altissima) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, CambodiaCouncil tree (Ficus altissima) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, CambodiaCouncil tree (Ficus altissima) on the archaeological site of Ta Prohm, Cambodia© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Council tree (Ficus altissima) on the archaeological site of Ta

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Abandoned salt marsh overgrown with Glasswort, Guérande, Loire Atlantique, FranceAbandoned salt marsh overgrown with Glasswort, Guérande, Loire Atlantique, FranceAbandoned salt marsh overgrown with Glasswort, Guérande, Loire Atlantique, France© Jean Mayet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Abandoned salt marsh overgrown with Glasswort, Guérande, Loire

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Zero wreck: Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! D: 15 m The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Zero wreck: Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! D: 15 m The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Zero wreck: Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! D: 15 m The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, papua New

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, Papua New, Guinea, Zero, Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. D: 15 m, The Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, Papua New, Guinea, Zero, Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. D: 15 m, The Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, Papua New, Guinea, Zero, Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. D: 15 m, The Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Kimbe Bay, Papua New,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Fore Reef, partly bleached, new colonies of Leather Coral (Sinularia sp), D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Fore Reef, partly bleached, new colonies of Leather Coral (Sinularia sp), D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Fore Reef, partly bleached, new colonies of Leather Coral (Sinularia sp), D: 2 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Bleaching process and re-colonisation by invertebrate life, D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Bleaching process and re-colonisation by invertebrate life, D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Bleaching process and re-colonisation by invertebrate life, D: 8 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba

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Burnt Forest Landscape Regrowing Spring, Hillsides of Hyères, Var, FranceBurnt Forest Landscape Regrowing Spring, Hillsides of Hyères, Var, FranceBurnt Forest Landscape Regrowing Spring, Hillsides of Hyères, Var, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Burnt Forest Landscape Regrowing Spring, Hillsides of Hyères,

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Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) regrowth the year after the fire, In a forest burned in the spring, Hills around Hyères, Var, FranceStrawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) regrowth the year after the fire, In a forest burned in the spring, Hills around Hyères, Var, FranceStrawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) regrowth the year after the fire, In a forest burned in the spring, Hills around Hyères, Var, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) regrowth the year after the fire,

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Natural regeneration of Chestnut and Scots pines in the quarries of Mormoiron, Mont Ventoux, Provence, FranceNatural regeneration of Chestnut and Scots pines in the quarries of Mormoiron, Mont Ventoux, Provence, FranceNatural regeneration of Chestnut and Scots pines in the quarries of Mormoiron, Mont Ventoux, Provence, France© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Natural regeneration of Chestnut and Scots pines in the quarries

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Mining maquis plant growing back after fire, Maquis vegetation burned by fire and soil washed away by rain. Complete reserve of the Montagnes des Sources. New Caledonia.Mining maquis plant growing back after fire, Maquis vegetation burned by fire and soil washed away by rain. Complete reserve of the Montagnes des Sources. New Caledonia.Mining maquis plant growing back after fire, Maquis vegetation burned by fire and soil washed away by rain. Complete reserve of the Montagnes des Sources. New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Mining maquis plant growing back after fire, Maquis vegetation

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Supermarket trolleys in Thau pond, Balaruc, Hérault, FranceSupermarket trolleys in Thau pond, Balaruc, Hérault, FranceSupermarket trolleys in Thau pond, Balaruc, Hérault, France© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Supermarket trolleys in Thau pond, Balaruc, Hérault, France

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, FranceOne of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of Loos-en-Gohelle are located on the basis of 11/19. They have been converted into spaces for walks and sports activities, Hauts-de-France, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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One of the two largest slag heaps in Europe, the twin heaps of

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Burned and regenerating coniferous forest, Lake Mac Donald shores, Glacier National Park, Montana, USABurned and regenerating coniferous forest, Lake Mac Donald shores, Glacier National Park, Montana, USABurned and regenerating coniferous forest, Lake Mac Donald shores, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA© H. Curtis / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Burned and regenerating coniferous forest, Lake Mac Donald

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Vegetation repels after fires caused by lightning, Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Vegetation repels after fires caused by lightning, Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Vegetation repels after fires caused by lightning, Alaska, USA© Robert Valarcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Vegetation repels

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), Alaska, USA© Robert Valarcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) autome around mile 20 through burnt forest, Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) autome around mile 20 through burnt forest, Alaska, USADalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) autome around mile 20 through burnt forest, Alaska, USA© Robert Valarcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dalton Highway : from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, Trans Alaska

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Pioneer flora moss and mushrooms on a burnt trunk, Jura, FrancePioneer flora moss and mushrooms on a burnt trunk, Jura, FrancePioneer flora moss and mushrooms on a burnt trunk, Jura, France© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pioneer flora moss and mushrooms on a burnt trunk, Jura, France

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Garrigue burned and recolonized by Orlaya (Orlaya grandiflora), Ardèche, FranceGarrigue burned and recolonized by Orlaya (Orlaya grandiflora), Ardèche, FranceGarrigue burned and recolonized by Orlaya (Orlaya grandiflora), Ardèche, France© Hervé Chellé / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Garrigue burned and recolonized by Orlaya (Orlaya grandiflora),

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Conifer forest destroyed by bark beetle without any human intervention and now regenerating, Bavaria (at the border with Czech Republic, GermanyConifer forest destroyed by bark beetle without any human intervention and now regenerating, Bavaria (at the border with Czech Republic, GermanyConifer forest destroyed by bark beetle without any human intervention and now regenerating, Bavaria (at the border with Czech Republic, Germany© Bruno Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Conifer forest destroyed by bark beetle without any human

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Rusty frame of an old car abandonned in the countryside in a pasture at the edge of a village, in Oise, Picardy, France. A tree is growing in the engine.Rusty frame of an old car abandonned in the countryside in a pasture at the edge of a village, in Oise, Picardy, France. A tree is growing in the engine.Rusty frame of an old car abandonned in the countryside in a pasture at the edge of a village, in Oise, Picardy, France. A tree is growing in the engine.© Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Rusty frame of an old car abandonned in the countryside in a

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Regrowth of Holm oaks (Quercus ilex) after a fire between Vailhan and Neffiès, Hérault, FranceRegrowth of Holm oaks (Quercus ilex) after a fire between Vailhan and Neffiès, Hérault, FranceRegrowth of Holm oaks (Quercus ilex) after a fire between Vailhan and Neffiès, Hérault, France© Thierry Le Quay / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Regrowth of Holm oaks (Quercus ilex) after a fire between Vailhan

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