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Child under a pirogue - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon Marine reserve WWF-Indonesia project	Territorial User Rights for Fishing (TURF)Child under a pirogue - Grogos Island Maluku IndonesiaChild under a pirogue - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon Marine reserve WWF-Indonesia project Territorial User Rights for Fishing (TURF)© Nicolas Cegalerba / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Child under a pirogue - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon

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Octopus drying - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon Marine reserve WWF-Indonesia project	Territorial User Rights for Fishing (TURF)Octopus drying - Grogos Island Maluku IndonesiaOctopus drying - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon Marine reserve WWF-Indonesia project Territorial User Rights for Fishing (TURF)© Nicolas Cegalerba / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Octopus drying - Grogos Island Maluku Indonesia ; Koon Marine

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), seeking shelter on from an incoming spring tide, Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), seeking shelter on from an incoming spring tide, Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), seeking shelter on from an incoming spring tide, Isabela Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on lava rock, Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on lava rock, Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on lava rock, Isabela Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) coming ashore after a swim of several hundred meters distance; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) coming ashore after a swim of several hundred meters distance; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) coming ashore after a swim of several hundred meters distance; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. diving Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus); Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. diving Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus); Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. diving Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus); Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Marine Iguana appears slow and clumsy on land, but this particular species of lizard is the only sea-going lizard in the world. However, it has to return the the land to breed.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. diving Marine Iguana

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pelican; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Brown Pelican is found throughout the Galapagos Islands, skimming over water, plunge-diving and resting in mangrove trees. Brown Pelicans measure around 41 inches in length and have a wingspan of 90 inches. The Galapagos population of the Brown Pelican is said to be an endemic (unique) subspecies of the Pelican Bird.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pelican; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Brown Pelican is found throughout the Galapagos Islands, skimming over water, plunge-diving and resting in mangrove trees. Brown Pelicans measure around 41 inches in length and have a wingspan of 90 inches. The Galapagos population of the Brown Pelican is said to be an endemic (unique) subspecies of the Pelican Bird.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pelican; Isabela Island; Galapagos, Ecuador; The Brown Pelican is found throughout the Galapagos Islands, skimming over water, plunge-diving and resting in mangrove trees. Brown Pelicans measure around 41 inches in length and have a wingspan of 90 inches. The Galapagos population of the Brown Pelican is said to be an endemic (unique) subspecies of the Pelican Bird.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pelican; Isabela Island;

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Incoming Tide near Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Incoming Tide near Isabela Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Incoming Tide near Isabela Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Incoming Tide near Isabela

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Schooling Yellowtail Surgeonfish (Prionurus laticlavius), Albany Islet, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Schooling Yellowtail Surgeonfish (Prionurus laticlavius), Albany Islet, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Schooling Yellowtail Surgeonfish (Prionurus laticlavius), Albany Islet, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Schooling Yellowtail

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae, endemic to the Galapagos Islands; rocky landscape covered with barnacles; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, Ecuador;Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae, endemic to the Galapagos Islands; rocky landscape covered with barnacles; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, Ecuador;Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae, endemic to the Galapagos Islands; rocky landscape covered with barnacles; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, Ecuador;© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped salema, Xenocys jessiae; Isabela Island (Cape Marshall), Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. shooling Black-striped

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of rocky uw-landscape with Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorPunta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of rocky uw-landscape with Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorPunta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of rocky uw-landscape with Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorPunta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched image© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of rocky

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Black Coral (Antipathes galapagensis, center bottom) and Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Black Coral (Antipathes galapagensis, center bottom) and Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Black Coral (Antipathes galapagensis, center bottom) and Gorgonian corals (Pacifigora, seafan or gorgonian octocoral) , off Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Black Coral

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, or common mola, is the heaviest known bony fish in the world. It has an average adult weight of 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the globe. It resembles a fish head with a tail, and its main body is flattened laterally. Sunfish can be as tall as they are long when their dorsal and ventral fins are extended. Sunfish live on a diet that consists mainly of jellyfish, but because this diet is nutritionally poor, they consume large amounts in order to develop and maintain their great bulk. Females of the species can produce more eggs than any other known vertebrate.[1] Sunfish fry resemble miniature pufferfish, with large pectoral fins, a tail fin and body spines uncharacteristic of adult sunfish. Adult sunfish are vulnerable to few natural predators, but sea lions, orcas and sharks will consume them. Among humans, sunfish are considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, including Japan, the Korean peninsula and Taiwan. In the EU, regulations ban the sale of fish and fishery products derived of the Molidae family. Sunfish are frequently, though accidentally, caught in gillnets, and are also vulnerable to harm or death from encounters with floating trash, such as plastic bags. A member of the order Tetraodontiformes, which also includes pufferfish, porcupinefish and filefish, the sunfish shares many traits common to members of this order. It was originally classified as Tetraodon mola under the pufferfish genus, but it has since been given its own genus, Mola, with two species under it. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, is the type species of the genus. Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, or common mola, is the heaviest known bony fish in the world. It has an average adult weight of 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the globe. It resembles a fish head with a tail, and its main body is flattened laterally. Sunfish can be as tall as they are long when their dorsal and ventral fins are extended. Sunfish live on a diet that consists mainly of jellyfish, but because this diet is nutritionally poor, they consume large amounts in order to develop and maintain their great bulk. Females of the species can produce more eggs than any other known vertebrate.[1] Sunfish fry resemble miniature pufferfish, with large pectoral fins, a tail fin and body spines uncharacteristic of adult sunfish. Adult sunfish are vulnerable to few natural predators, but sea lions, orcas and sharks will consume them. Among humans, sunfish are considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, including Japan, the Korean peninsula and Taiwan. In the EU, regulations ban the sale of fish and fishery products derived of the Molidae family. Sunfish are frequently, though accidentally, caught in gillnets, and are also vulnerable to harm or death from encounters with floating trash, such as plastic bags. A member of the order Tetraodontiformes, which also includes pufferfish, porcupinefish and filefish, the sunfish shares many traits common to members of this order. It was originally classified as Tetraodon mola under the pufferfish genus, but it has since been given its own genus, Mola, with two species under it. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, is the type species of the genus. Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, or common mola, is the heaviest known bony fish in the world. It has an average adult weight of 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). The species is native to tropical and temperate waters around the globe. It resembles a fish head with a tail, and its main body is flattened laterally. Sunfish can be as tall as they are long when their dorsal and ventral fins are extended. Sunfish live on a diet that consists mainly of jellyfish, but because this diet is nutritionally poor, they consume large amounts in order to develop and maintain their great bulk. Females of the species can produce more eggs than any other known vertebrate.[1] Sunfish fry resemble miniature pufferfish, with large pectoral fins, a tail fin and body spines uncharacteristic of adult sunfish. Adult sunfish are vulnerable to few natural predators, but sea lions, orcas and sharks will consume them. Among humans, sunfish are considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, including Japan, the Korean peninsula and Taiwan. In the EU, regulations ban the sale of fish and fishery products derived of the Molidae family. Sunfish are frequently, though accidentally, caught in gillnets, and are also vulnerable to harm or death from encounters with floating trash, such as plastic bags. A member of the order Tetraodontiformes, which also includes pufferfish, porcupinefish and filefish, the sunfish shares many traits common to members of this order. It was originally classified as Tetraodon mola under the pufferfish genus, but it has since been given its own genus, Mola, with two species under it. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, is the type species of the genus. Punta Vicente Roca, Isabela, Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The ocean sunfish, Mola mola,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), Roca Redonda, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), Roca Redonda, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki), Roca Redonda, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (sea star) on

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. 3 Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. 3 Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. 3 Starfish (sea star) on barnacles; Roca Redonda, Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. 3 Starfish (sea star) on

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Bubbles rise from underwater volcanic vents among rocks, the openings are crusted with sulfur, Roca Redonda, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Bubbles rise from underwater volcanic vents among rocks, the openings are crusted with sulfur, Roca Redonda, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Bubbles rise from underwater volcanic vents among rocks, the openings are crusted with sulfur, Roca Redonda, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Bubbles rise from underwater

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of the typical and sole official dive spot off Darwin Arch, called "theatre", Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of the typical and sole official dive spot off Darwin Arch, called "theatre", Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of the typical and sole official dive spot off Darwin Arch, called "theatre", Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador. Stitched image© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Panoramic view of the typical

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Galapagos Garden Eels

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (Asteroidae) and Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (Asteroidae) and Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (Asteroidae) and Galapagos Garden Eels (Heteroconger cobra), depth -30m, off Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Starfish (Asteroidae) and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Shooling Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus), Wolf Island, Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Shooling Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus), Wolf Island, Darwin Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Shooling Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus), Wolf Island, Darwin Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Shooling Pacific creolefish

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Darwin Arch; Darwin Island (Culpepper); Galapagos; Ecuador; Darwin Island is named in honour of Charles Darwin. Darwin Island is just several miles further North from Wolf Island. At only one square kilometre, it is the 18th largest island in the Galapagos Archipelago (making one of the smallest). With no dry landing sites, Darwin Islands main attractions are not found above the surface, but rather in the depths of the Pacific, which is teeming with a spectacular variety of marine life. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Darwin Arch; Darwin Island (Culpepper); Galapagos; Ecuador; Darwin Island is named in honour of Charles Darwin. Darwin Island is just several miles further North from Wolf Island. At only one square kilometre, it is the 18th largest island in the Galapagos Archipelago (making one of the smallest). With no dry landing sites, Darwin Islands main attractions are not found above the surface, but rather in the depths of the Pacific, which is teeming with a spectacular variety of marine life. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Darwin Arch; Darwin Island (Culpepper); Galapagos; Ecuador; Darwin Island is named in honour of Charles Darwin. Darwin Island is just several miles further North from Wolf Island. At only one square kilometre, it is the 18th largest island in the Galapagos Archipelago (making one of the smallest). With no dry landing sites, Darwin Islands main attractions are not found above the surface, but rather in the depths of the Pacific, which is teeming with a spectacular variety of marine life. Stitched image© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Darwin Arch; Darwin Island

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), Wolf Island, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), Wolf Island, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), Wolf Island, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Scalloped hammerhead shark

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus) and schooling Pelican barracudas (Sphyraena idiastes), background, Wolf Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus) and schooling Pelican barracudas (Sphyraena idiastes), background, Wolf Island, Galapagos, EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pacific creolefish (Paranthias colonus) and schooling Pelican barracudas (Sphyraena idiastes), background, Wolf Island, Galapagos, Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Pacific creolefish

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. schooling Pelican barracudas, (Sphyraena idiastes); Wolf Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. schooling Pelican barracudas, (Sphyraena idiastes); Wolf Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. schooling Pelican barracudas, (Sphyraena idiastes); Wolf Island; Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. schooling Pelican barracudas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The Bottlenose (or Bottle Nosed) dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Galapagos cooler pelagic waters tend to be larger than their cousins who inhabit warmer, shallower waters. Those in colder waters have a fattier composition more suited to deep-diving. Adults range in length from 2 to 4 metres (6 to 13 feet) and weigh from 150 to 650 kilograms (330 to 1430 pounds). Males are longer and heavier than females. The lifespan of the female Bottlenose Dolphin is about 40 years, whereas males rarely live more than 30 years.Wolf Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The Bottlenose (or Bottle Nosed) dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Galapagos cooler pelagic waters tend to be larger than their cousins who inhabit warmer, shallower waters. Those in colder waters have a fattier composition more suited to deep-diving. Adults range in length from 2 to 4 metres (6 to 13 feet) and weigh from 150 to 650 kilograms (330 to 1430 pounds). Males are longer and heavier than females. The lifespan of the female Bottlenose Dolphin is about 40 years, whereas males rarely live more than 30 years.Wolf Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The Bottlenose (or Bottle Nosed) dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Galapagos cooler pelagic waters tend to be larger than their cousins who inhabit warmer, shallower waters. Those in colder waters have a fattier composition more suited to deep-diving. Adults range in length from 2 to 4 metres (6 to 13 feet) and weigh from 150 to 650 kilograms (330 to 1430 pounds). Males are longer and heavier than females. The lifespan of the female Bottlenose Dolphin is about 40 years, whereas males rarely live more than 30 years.Wolf Island; Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. The Bottlenose (or Bottle

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched imageTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; Ecuador. Stitched image© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada; Puerto Isidro

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada - shark channel; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada - shark channel; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada - shark channel; Puerto Isidro Ayora, Santa Cruz Island; Galapagos; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Punta Estrada - shark

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing small shrimps (symbiosis?). A salp (plural salps) or salpa (plural salpae or salpas) is a barrel-shaped, planktonic tunicate. It moves by contracting, thus pumping water through its gelatinous body. The salp strains the pumped water through its internal feeding filters, feeding on phytoplankton. Salps are common in equatorial, temperate, and cold seas, where they can be seen at the surface, singly or in long, stringy colonies. The most abundant concentrations of salps are in the Southern Ocean (near Antarctica). Here they sometimes form enormous swarms, often in deep water, and are sometimes even more abundant than krill. Over the last century, while krill populations in the Southern Ocean have declined, salp populations appear to be increasing. The chain of salps is the aggregate portion of the life cycle. The aggregate individuals are also known as blastozooids; they remain attached together while swimming and feeding, and each individual grows in size. Each blastozooid in the chain reproduces sexually (the blastozooids are sequential hermaphrodites, first maturing as females, and are fertilized by male gametes produced by older chains), with a growing embryo oozoid attached to the body wall of the parent. The growing oozoids are eventually released from the parent blastozooids, then they continue to feed and grow as the solitary asexual phase, thus closing the life cycle of salps.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Salp aggregation containing

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species undetermined), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plankton (species

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and plancton particles; the diver is Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophore and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/TaraexpeditionsTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/TaraexpeditionsTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods. Living plancton, photographed on board Tara; Photo (M): Christoph Gerigk/CNRS/Taraexpeditions© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Chaetognaths and copepods.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinator© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Prof. Gabriel Gorsky speaking at scientific meeting on board Tara, Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Prof. Gabriel Gorsky speaking at scientific meeting on board Tara, Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Prof. Gabriel Gorsky speaking at scientific meeting on board Tara, Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Prof. Gabriel Gorsky speaking

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos lag; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos lag; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos lag; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. sailing Tara;

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Sailing Tara; Guayaquil-Galapagos leg; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Sailing Tara;

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara; Guayas river delta; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara; Guayas river delta; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara; Guayas river delta; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara; Guayas river delta;

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara docked at Malecon pier; Guayas river; Guayaquil city; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara docked at Malecon pier; Guayas river; Guayaquil city; EcuadorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara docked at Malecon pier; Guayas river; Guayaquil city; Ecuador© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara docked at Malecon pier;

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Landscape of sponges on the seafloor. 3D model available, D: 22 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Landscape of sponges on the seafloor. 3D model available, D: 22 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Landscape of sponges on the seafloor. 3D model available, D: 22 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Landscape of sponges on

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish (vertical view), D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish (vertical view), D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish (vertical view), D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral and reef fish, D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point Pristine fore reef Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point Pristine fore reef Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point Pristine fore reef Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral (Acropora spp, Seriatopora sp.) and reef fish Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral (Acropora spp, Seriatopora sp.) and reef fish Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef with many species of of stone coral (Acropora spp, Seriatopora sp.) and reef fish Branching Coral Zone, D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 14000 x 5900 px, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 14000 x 5900 px, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 14000 x 5900 px, D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 19855 x 8082 px, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 19855 x 8082 px, D: 5 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay Pristine fore reef, Stitched panorama 19855 x 8082 px, D: 5 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay, D: 30 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay, D: 30 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s Point, Kimbe Bay, D: 30 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Oto Reef or Otto’s

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Back Reef with small lagoon, red sea fan (Melithaea sp), Restorf Island, Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, D: 1 m, stitched panorama 10534 x 4906 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Back Reef with small lagoon, red sea fan (Melithaea sp), Restorf Island, Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, D: 1 m, stitched panorama 10534 x 4906 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Back Reef with small lagoon, red sea fan (Melithaea sp), Restorf Island, Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, D: 1 m, stitched panorama 10534 x 4906 px© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Back Reef with small

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Table coral (Acropora sp.) and Damselfish (Pomacentridae), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 4 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Table coral (Acropora sp.) and Damselfish (Pomacentridae), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 4 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Table coral (Acropora sp.) and Damselfish (Pomacentridae), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 4 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Table coral (Acropora

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red:

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red: Melithaea sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Gorgonian sea fans (red:

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Invertebrate marine life: molluscs, sponges, gorgonians, hard coral (yellow, front Acropora sp.; backgnd: Porites sp.) The cockscomb oyster, Lopha cristagalli, is a species of marine bivalve molluscs in the family Ostreidae. Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Invertebrate marine life: molluscs, sponges, gorgonians, hard coral (yellow, front Acropora sp.; backgnd: Porites sp.) The cockscomb oyster, Lopha cristagalli, is a species of marine bivalve molluscs in the family Ostreidae. Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Invertebrate marine life: molluscs, sponges, gorgonians, hard coral (yellow, front Acropora sp.; backgnd: Porites sp.) The cockscomb oyster, Lopha cristagalli, is a species of marine bivalve molluscs in the family Ostreidae. Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Invertebrate marine life:

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sandy channel with Whip Corals (Junceella sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sandy channel with Whip Corals (Junceella sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sandy channel with Whip Corals (Junceella sp), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 22 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sandy channel with Whip

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals, Gorgonian, stone corals, Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 13 m, Papua New Guinea, stitched panorama 11958 x 5377 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals, Gorgonian, stone corals, Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 13 m, Papua New Guinea, stitched panorama 11958 x 5377 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals, Gorgonian, stone corals, Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 13 m, Papua New Guinea, stitched panorama 11958 x 5377 px© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Blue-Gold Fusiliers (Caesio teres), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 12 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Blue-Gold Fusiliers (Caesio teres), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 12 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Blue-Gold Fusiliers (Caesio teres), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef D: 12 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Elephant Ear Sponge

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Barrel sponges (Xestospongia testudinaria), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Barrel sponges (Xestospongia testudinaria), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Barrel sponges (Xestospongia testudinaria), Red Sea Whip Corals (Ellisella ceratophyta), Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, D: 12 m, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Barrel sponges

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Huge Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta) of approx. 2,5 m height. Typically found on coral reefs in areas with rapid water flows. D: 12 m Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Huge Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta) of approx. 2,5 m height. Typically found on coral reefs in areas with rapid water flows. D: 12 m Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Huge Elephant Ear Sponge (Ianthella basta) of approx. 2,5 m height. Typically found on coral reefs in areas with rapid water flows. D: 12 m Northeast Kimbe Bay reef, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Huge Elephant Ear Sponge

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Ancient lava flow, small Cauliflower corals, D: 3 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Ancient lava flow, small Cauliflower corals, D: 3 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Ancient lava flow, small Cauliflower corals, D: 3 m, Anne Sophie’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Ancient lava flow, small

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), Divers: (r) Miriam Giru, dive guide / Walindi Plant. and Jörn auf dem Kampe, GEO staff writer & editor, D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay Deep fore reef, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), Divers: (r) Miriam Giru, dive guide / Walindi Plant. and Jörn auf dem Kampe, GEO staff writer & editor, D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay Deep fore reef, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), Divers: (r) Miriam Giru, dive guide / Walindi Plant. and Jörn auf dem Kampe, GEO staff writer & editor, D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay Deep fore reef, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Swarm of Commerson's

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Swarm of Commerson's anchovies (Stolephorus commersonnii), D: 20 m Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Swarm of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges, small table coral and anemones cover the top of the seamount at approx 20 m depth, Diver: Jörn a.d.Kampe/GEO, D: 20 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, Stitched image 7825 x 5280 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges, small table coral and anemones cover the top of the seamount at approx 20 m depth, Diver: Jörn a.d.Kampe/GEO, D: 20 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, Stitched image 7825 x 5280 pxTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges, small table coral and anemones cover the top of the seamount at approx 20 m depth, Diver: Jörn a.d.Kampe/GEO, D: 20 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, Stitched image 7825 x 5280 px© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges, small table

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Napoleon or Humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), hiding under staghorn coral (Acropora sp.). The Napoleon wrasse is long-lived, but has a very slow breeding rate. Individuals become sexually mature at four to six years, and. Males are typically larger than females and are capable of reaching lengths of up to 2 m and weighing up to 180 kg. Females are known to live for around 50 years.live for around 50 years. D: 22 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Napoleon or Humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), hiding under staghorn coral (Acropora sp.). The Napoleon wrasse is long-lived, but has a very slow breeding rate. Individuals become sexually mature at four to six years, and. Males are typically larger than females and are capable of reaching lengths of up to 2 m and weighing up to 180 kg. Females are known to live for around 50 years.live for around 50 years. D: 22 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Napoleon or Humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), hiding under staghorn coral (Acropora sp.). The Napoleon wrasse is long-lived, but has a very slow breeding rate. Individuals become sexually mature at four to six years, and. Males are typically larger than females and are capable of reaching lengths of up to 2 m and weighing up to 180 kg. Females are known to live for around 50 years.live for around 50 years. D: 22 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Napoleon or Humphead

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Isolated reef rises from considerable depths to forty-five feet (14 meters) below the surface. As with Bradford Shoals, the basic reef structure is primarily composed of flat plates and mounds of non-staghorn corals. In addition there are also large stands of a grayish soft coral, probably Nephthya. From the bare patch at its crest (15-25m depth) , the reef falls away in sheer vertical walls, D: 31 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Isolated reef rises from considerable depths to forty-five feet (14 meters) below the surface. As with Bradford Shoals, the basic reef structure is primarily composed of flat plates and mounds of non-staghorn corals. In addition there are also large stands of a grayish soft coral, probably Nephthya. From the bare patch at its crest (15-25m depth) , the reef falls away in sheer vertical walls, D: 31 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Isolated reef rises from considerable depths to forty-five feet (14 meters) below the surface. As with Bradford Shoals, the basic reef structure is primarily composed of flat plates and mounds of non-staghorn corals. In addition there are also large stands of a grayish soft coral, probably Nephthya. From the bare patch at its crest (15-25m depth) , the reef falls away in sheer vertical walls, D: 31 m, Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Isolated reef rises from

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 D: 22 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay The reef structure is predominantly flat plates of hard corals, and adaptation allowing maximum utilization of the reduced sunlight at that depth. There are also many colonies of Leather Coral, Sarcophyton.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 D: 22 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay The reef structure is predominantly flat plates of hard corals, and adaptation allowing maximum utilization of the reduced sunlight at that depth. There are also many colonies of Leather Coral, Sarcophyton.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 D: 22 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay The reef structure is predominantly flat plates of hard corals, and adaptation allowing maximum utilization of the reduced sunlight at that depth. There are also many colonies of Leather Coral, Sarcophyton.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 D: 22 m Bradford Shoal

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus). The reef slopes downward from its twin summits to a lip at about 27 m, after which the drop is vertical, D: 27 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus). The reef slopes downward from its twin summits to a lip at about 27 m, after which the drop is vertical, D: 27 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus). The reef slopes downward from its twin summits to a lip at about 27 m, after which the drop is vertical, D: 27 m Bradford Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus), also known as the bigeye jack, great trevally, six-banded trevally and dusky jack, D: 11 m Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus), also known as the bigeye jack, great trevally, six-banded trevally and dusky jack, D: 11 m Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus), also known as the bigeye jack, great trevally, six-banded trevally and dusky jack, D: 11 m Inglis Shoal seamount, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Shool of bigeye

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