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Search result Mulga (Acacia aneura)

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The Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
2126413

2126413

The Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the

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The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
2126406

2126406

The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
2126405

2126405

The Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in

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The Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
2126396

2126396

The Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice

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The Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
2126393

2126393

The Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

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