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Faire refleurir un hippéastrum. Faire refleurir un hippéastrum. 6 Rechausser / rempoterFaire refleurir un hippéastrum. Faire refleurir un hippéastrum. 6 Rechausser / rempoterFaire refleurir un hippéastrum. Faire refleurir un hippéastrum. 6 Rechausser / rempoter© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2431074

Faire refleurir un hippéastrum. Faire refleurir un hippéastrum.

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Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 5 DivideMake a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 5 DivideMake a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 5 Divide© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2431073

Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 5 Divide

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Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 4 FertilizeMake a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 4 FertilizeMake a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 4 Fertilize© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2431072

Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 4 Fertilize

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Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 2. The bulb participates in photosynthesis when exposed to light.Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 2. The bulb participates in photosynthesis when exposed to light.Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 2. The bulb participates in photosynthesis when exposed to light.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2431070

Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 2. The bulb

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Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 1. Remove the old tunics.Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 1. Remove the old tunics.Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 1. Remove the old tunics.© Jean-Michel Groult / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2431069

Make a Amaryllis (Hippeastrum sp) bloom again. 1. Remove the old

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424327

Treating Koi pond

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424326

Treating Koi pond

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424325

Treating Koi pond

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Treating a Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Blue Pimbwe' wounded by a preyed synodontisTreating a Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Blue Pimbwe' wounded by a preyed synodontisTreating a Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Blue Pimbwe' wounded by a preyed synodontis© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424302

Treating a Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Blue Pimbwe' wounded by a

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Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2131085

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has

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Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2131084

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has

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Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) . A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) . A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) . A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2131083

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) . A turtle that has

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Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has swallowed a nylon with a hook. Longline fishing. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2131071

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). A turtle that has

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Amantari, 39, shaman, having just applied crushed bamboo shoot acting as anti pain to his patient, Pulau Siberut, Sumatra, IndonesiaAmantari, 39, shaman, having just applied crushed bamboo shoot acting as anti pain to his patient, Pulau Siberut, Sumatra, IndonesiaAmantari, 39, shaman, having just applied crushed bamboo shoot acting as anti pain to his patient, Pulau Siberut, Sumatra, Indonesia© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2124311

Amantari, 39, shaman, having just applied crushed bamboo shoot

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Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza area© N. Cegalerba / J. Szwemberg / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2123256

Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala

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Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza area© N. Cegalerba / J. Szwemberg / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2123255

Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala

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Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza areaPhilippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala Foundation removing ticks from a critically endangered Philippines forest turtle (Siebenrockiella leytensis) during a Rapid Biodiversity Assessment in Mendoza area© N. Cegalerba / J. Szwemberg / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2123254

Philippines, Palawan, Roxas, Dr Sabine Shoppe from Katala

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The honey of the untouchables, on Deva Verea sacred cliff, Spirits of the forest are powerful, and they look after sacred plants, rocks and cliffs. Tamil Nadu, IndiaThe honey of the untouchables, on Deva Verea sacred cliff, Spirits of the forest are powerful, and they look after sacred plants, rocks and cliffs. Tamil Nadu, IndiaThe honey of the untouchables, on Deva Verea sacred cliff, Spirits of the forest are powerful, and they look after sacred plants, rocks and cliffs. Tamil Nadu, India© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105176

The honey of the untouchables, on Deva Verea sacred cliff,

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Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102651

Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and

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Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102650

Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a

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Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102649

Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering

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Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102648

Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in

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Nurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandNurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandNurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea turtle, at the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102630

Nurse administering an injection to an injured Loggerhead sea

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Young injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandYoung injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion IslandYoung injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102629

Young injured turtle that was taken in a pool of the Kelonia

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Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle after its surgery, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102628

Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph

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Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph of a turtle, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102627

Stéphane Ciccione, Manager of Kelonia, observing the radiograph

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Nurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion IslandNurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion IslandNurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102626

Nurses taking care of a turtle at Kelonia Turtles protection

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Kelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion IslandKelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion IslandKelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102625

Kelonia's outdoor pools, turtles' protection centre, Reunion

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Flatten cabbage leaf for poulticeFlatten cabbage leaf for poulticeFlatten cabbage leaf for poultice© Lamontagne / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2096105

Flatten cabbage leaf for poultice

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Aloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising caresAloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising caresAloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising cares© Lamontagne / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2096103

Aloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising cares

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Aloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising caresAloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising caresAloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising cares© Lamontagne / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2096102

Aloe vera : medicinal plant for health and cicatrising cares

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Veterinarian looking at skin tests results following a diagnostic of atopic dermatitisVeterinarian looking at skin tests results following a diagnostic of atopic dermatitisVeterinarian looking at skin tests results following a diagnostic of atopic dermatitis© Frédéric Decante / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2088136

Veterinarian looking at skin tests results following a diagnostic

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Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2074171

Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.

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Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2074170

Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.

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Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2074169

Guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis), Benin.

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Insect bite neutralization with Plantain leaf - France ; Guy Lalière rubbing insect bite with a plantain leaf chewedInsect bite neutralization with Plantain leaf - FranceInsect bite neutralization with Plantain leaf - France ; Guy Lalière rubbing insect bite with a plantain leaf chewed© Quentin Marquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2041221

Insect bite neutralization with Plantain leaf - France ; Guy

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Healer and Asian Elephant in a river - Thailand ; Elephant Nature ParkHealer and Asian Elephant in a river - ThailandHealer and Asian Elephant in a river - Thailand ; Elephant Nature Park© Stéphanie Meng / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030648

Healer and Asian Elephant in a river - Thailand ; Elephant Nature

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Tawny Owl in a care center - Picardie France  ; Care center wildlife association Picardie Nature Tawny Owl in a care center - Picardie France Tawny Owl in a care center - Picardie France ; Care center wildlife association Picardie Nature © Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030562

Tawny Owl in a care center - Picardie France ; Care center

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Hedgehog road kill in a care center - Picardie France ; The hedgehog sanctuary Hedgehog road kill in a care center - Picardie FranceHedgehog road kill in a care center - Picardie France ; The hedgehog sanctuary © Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2030561

Hedgehog road kill in a care center - Picardie France ; The

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Healer taking notes on a sparrow recovering -Camargue FranceHealer taking notes on a sparrow recovering -Camargue FranceHealer taking notes on a sparrow recovering -Camargue France© Pascal Pittorino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2008889

Healer taking notes on a sparrow recovering -Camargue France

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Magnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a cat© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001600

Magnetic therapy on a cat

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Magnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a cat© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001599

Magnetic therapy on a cat

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Magnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a catMagnetic therapy on a cat© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001598

Magnetic therapy on a cat

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Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog © Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001596

Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog

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Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog © Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001595

Magnetic therapy on a Czechoslovakian wolfdog

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Magnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dog© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001538

Magnetic therapy on a dog

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Magnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dog© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001537

Magnetic therapy on a dog

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Magnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dogMagnetic therapy on a dog© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001536

Magnetic therapy on a dog

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Magnetic therapy on a donkeyMagnetic therapy on a donkeyMagnetic therapy on a donkey© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2001535

Magnetic therapy on a donkey

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Magnetic therapy on a donkeyMagnetic therapy on a donkeyMagnetic therapy on a donkey© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Magnetic therapy on a donkey

RMRight Managed

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