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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, ToulouseApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Centre for , FranceResearch, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows

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West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.<br>With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef BaseVisualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ; Fluorescein dye is used to visualize how water is absorbed at the outside and then exhausted by a sponge.The Caribbean barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, is a large and common member of the coral reef communities at depths greater than 10 m, and has been called the “redwood of the deep”, due to its up to 2000 year lifespan as well as its size and color. Despite its prominence, high biomass and importance to habitat complexity and reef health, very little is know about the basic biology of this massive sponge, including rates of mortality and recruitment, reproduction, growth and age. Like reef corals, this sponge is subject to bleaching and subsequent mortality.
With support from NOAA's Aquarius Reef Base at UNCW, NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a research group has been monitoring populations of X. muta in the Florida Keys since 1997.
© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Visualization flow of water in a sponge - Aquarius Reef Base ;

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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification MissionScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base FloridaScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification Mission© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris

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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric

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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui IslandMeasuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University (NZ) on North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), Hauraki Gulf, Ponui Island© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Measuring kiwi's beak, Research programm of Massey University

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, Greece© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinatorTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans Scientific Coordinator (standing) and Christian Sardet, Tara multimedia platform coordinator© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Gaby Gorsky, Tara Oceans

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can distinguish and sort individuals and on the basis of their size and their aspect : large or small, more round or more elongated. In 200 ml of water there can be 1 to 10 thousands cells. The FlowCAM’s main attribute is a laser used to detect two pigments: chlorophyll and phycoerythrin which are present in red algae and some cyanobacteria. When an organism containing those pigments crosses the laser beam, it triggers a flash and the machine instantaneously takes a picture. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: FlowCAM can

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity Temperature Density instrumental platform with 7 additional sensors), Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. CTD-Rosette (Conductivity

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State University© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b Tara© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Pheromone trap of last generation without water and maintenance developed by INRA to fight biologically against pine processionary caterpillars at Cap d'Erquy, Côtes-d'Armor, FrancePheromone trap of last generation without water and maintenance developed by INRA to fight biologically against pine processionary caterpillars at Cap d'Erquy, Côtes-d'Armor, FrancePheromone trap of last generation without water and maintenance developed by INRA to fight biologically against pine processionary caterpillars at Cap d'Erquy, Côtes-d'Armor, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pheromone trap of last generation without water and maintenance

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Insect trap in Organic soilless culture greenhouse. New Caledonia.Insect trap in Organic soilless culture greenhouse. New Caledonia.Insect trap in Organic soilless culture greenhouse. New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398183

Insect trap in Organic soilless culture greenhouse. New Caledonia.

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398167

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

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Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398166

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

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Mosquito trap placed along the Rhone to protect residents, FranceMosquito trap placed along the Rhone to protect residents, FranceMosquito trap placed along the Rhone to protect residents, France© Bruno Fouillat / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2394519

Mosquito trap placed along the Rhone to protect residents, France

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Laboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, FranceLaboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, FranceLaboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2168383

Laboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, France

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CTD. For measurement of conductivity, temperature, depth; dissolved oxygen, ph, etc on ocean water. Oceanographic tool. PortugalCTD. For measurement of conductivity, temperature, depth; dissolved oxygen, ph, etc on ocean water. Oceanographic tool. PortugalCTD. For measurement of conductivity, temperature, depth; dissolved oxygen, ph, etc on ocean water. Oceanographic tool. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2167889

CTD. For measurement of conductivity, temperature, depth;

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Niskin bottle. The bottle, more precisely a plastic cylinder, is lowered on a cable into the ocean, and when it has reached the required depth, a brass weight called a "messenger" is dropped down the cable. Each end is equipped with a cap which is either spring-loaded or tensioned by an elastic rope. The action of the messenger weight is to trip both caps shut and seal the tube trapping the water sample inside. PortugalNiskin bottle. The bottle, more precisely a plastic cylinder, is lowered on a cable into the ocean, and when it has reached the required depth, a brass weight called a "messenger" is dropped down the cable. Each end is equipped with a cap which is either spring-loaded or tensioned by an elastic rope. The action of the messenger weight is to trip both caps shut and seal the tube trapping the water sample inside. PortugalNiskin bottle. The bottle, more precisely a plastic cylinder, is lowered on a cable into the ocean, and when it has reached the required depth, a brass weight called a "messenger" is dropped down the cable. Each end is equipped with a cap which is either spring-loaded or tensioned by an elastic rope. The action of the messenger weight is to trip both caps shut and seal the tube trapping the water sample inside. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2167888

Niskin bottle. The bottle, more precisely a plastic cylinder, is

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167052

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167043

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night,

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167040

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night,

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167039

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night,

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167038

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) on Insect trap at night,

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catch on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catch on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catch on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167037

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catch on Insect trap at

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167036

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap

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Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, EuropeSpanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap at night, The Ports Natural Park, Terres de L'Ebre, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2167035

Spanish moon moth (Graellsia isabellae) catching on Insect trap

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Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2135432

Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France

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Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2135431

Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France

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Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2135429

Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France

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Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, FranceOlive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2135428

Olive fruit fly trap in olive grove, Alpilles, Provence, France

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Laboratory mice (Mus musculus), NetherlandsLaboratory mice (Mus musculus), NetherlandsLaboratory mice (Mus musculus), Netherlands© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2124094

Laboratory mice (Mus musculus), Netherlands

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120283

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120282

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120281

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120280

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120279

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120278

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120277

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120276

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120275

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120274

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120273

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120272

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeAmber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120271

Amber deposit, Palaeontological Site of Rábago/El Soplao, El

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Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105384

Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece

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Portrait of David Roubik, biologist specializing in the stingless bee, the Africanized bee and pollination at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama. The tropical world of stingless beesPortrait of David Roubik, biologist specializing in the stingless bee, the Africanized bee and pollination at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama. The tropical world of stingless beesPortrait of David Roubik, biologist specializing in the stingless bee, the Africanized bee and pollination at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105370

Portrait of David Roubik, biologist specializing in the stingless

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In the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the AmazonIn the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the AmazonIn the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105335

In the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of

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Thierry Denis INRA Bordeaux / Agroecological health of the vineyard. He studies the behavioral ecology of insects and is trying to develop countermeasures based on their behavior. For him, the use of insecticides is not faultless because it disperses the insecticide in nature. Here, an experiment on a young nest seeks to determine the hornets' favorite food sources. FranceThierry Denis INRA Bordeaux / Agroecological health of the vineyard. He studies the behavioral ecology of insects and is trying to develop countermeasures based on their behavior. For him, the use of insecticides is not faultless because it disperses the insecticide in nature. Here, an experiment on a young nest seeks to determine the hornets' favorite food sources. FranceThierry Denis INRA Bordeaux / Agroecological health of the vineyard. He studies the behavioral ecology of insects and is trying to develop countermeasures based on their behavior. For him, the use of insecticides is not faultless because it disperses the insecticide in nature. Here, an experiment on a young nest seeks to determine the hornets' favorite food sources. France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103611

Thierry Denis INRA Bordeaux / Agroecological health of the

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Antoine Couto, 28 years old, doctoral student at the CNRS (national center for scientific research) of Gif sur Yvette. He studies the behavioral neurophysiology of the Asian hornet and seeks to discover which pheromones induce predatory action in the Asian hornet. That could allow for a sort of “counterattack” by injecting these pheromones into the hornets' nest and thus deregulate their social behavior. The hornets' nest would self-devour itself... FracneAntoine Couto, 28 years old, doctoral student at the CNRS (national center for scientific research) of Gif sur Yvette. He studies the behavioral neurophysiology of the Asian hornet and seeks to discover which pheromones induce predatory action in the Asian hornet. That could allow for a sort of “counterattack” by injecting these pheromones into the hornets' nest and thus deregulate their social behavior. The hornets' nest would self-devour itself... FracneAntoine Couto, 28 years old, doctoral student at the CNRS (national center for scientific research) of Gif sur Yvette. He studies the behavioral neurophysiology of the Asian hornet and seeks to discover which pheromones induce predatory action in the Asian hornet. That could allow for a sort of “counterattack” by injecting these pheromones into the hornets' nest and thus deregulate their social behavior. The hornets' nest would self-devour itself... Fracne© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103610

Antoine Couto, 28 years old, doctoral student at the CNRS

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Apidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann assists Prof Konrad Oechsner with the installation of a new sensor that continuously records at several points in the colony the temperatures and humidity level in the hive. Hobos- Würzburg University, GermanyApidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann assists Prof Konrad Oechsner with the installation of a new sensor that continuously records at several points in the colony the temperatures and humidity level in the hive. Hobos- Würzburg University, GermanyApidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann assists Prof Konrad Oechsner with the installation of a new sensor that continuously records at several points in the colony the temperatures and humidity level in the hive. Hobos- Würzburg University, Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103527

Apidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann assists Prof Konrad Oechsner

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Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of visual learning for the bees. The bees are suspended in the locomotion compensator conceived for the analysis of their visual orientation. The bee, immobilized by the thorax, is placed on a hollow sphere of which the movements, induced by the walking of the bee, are recorded by optical sensors that allow for the reconstruction of the bee's trajectory. The bee walking on the compensator is exposed to visual stimuli present inside a cylindrical arena. The CRCA has shown that the cognitive capacities of recognition of visual forms by domestic bees are similar to those of humans and primates. This work was published in the revue Nature 2004. CNRS. Université Paul Sabatier. Toulouse.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103526

Apidologie - Alexis Buatois observes a new virtual system of

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Apidologie - Portrait of Gerhard Vonend, IT engineer, in front of the digital storage center of the Hobos research center. Hobos - Würzburg university, Germany.Apidologie - Portrait of Gerhard Vonend, IT engineer, in front of the digital storage center of the Hobos research center. Hobos - Würzburg university, Germany.Apidologie - Portrait of Gerhard Vonend, IT engineer, in front of the digital storage center of the Hobos research center. Hobos - Würzburg university, Germany.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103525

Apidologie - Portrait of Gerhard Vonend, IT engineer, in front of

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Apidologie - This experimental hive has a camera for checking activity, a scanner at the entrance to count the bees implanted with microchips and several thermometers and microphones in the hive. This allows for constant monitoring and years of data are now available. Hobos- Würzburg University, GermanyApidologie - This experimental hive has a camera for checking activity, a scanner at the entrance to count the bees implanted with microchips and several thermometers and microphones in the hive. This allows for constant monitoring and years of data are now available. Hobos- Würzburg University, GermanyApidologie - This experimental hive has a camera for checking activity, a scanner at the entrance to count the bees implanted with microchips and several thermometers and microphones in the hive. This allows for constant monitoring and years of data are now available. Hobos- Würzburg University, Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103524

Apidologie - This experimental hive has a camera for checking

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Apidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann observing the bees' activity with a thermal camera. Hobos - University of Würzburg, GermanyApidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann observing the bees' activity with a thermal camera. Hobos - University of Würzburg, GermanyApidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann observing the bees' activity with a thermal camera. Hobos - University of Würzburg, Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103523

Apidologie - Benjamin Rutschmann observing the bees' activity

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Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, FranceApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, FranceApidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows for an association between an odor and a sugary reward. A sweet solution is applied to the antennas and the bee stretches out its proboscis, its little trunk. This odor-reflex association has brought to light the bees' capacity to remember odors and the time necessary to acquire olfactory memory. But also more complex learning: for example, an odor A is associated with a sugary solution and an odor B is not. Then, shortly after, it is reversed: the odor A is no longer associated with sugar but the odor B is. Result: the bee is capable of replacing the first signal by the new one. Paul Sabatier University, CNRS, Toulouse, France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103519

Apidologie - A bee in front of an odor gun. This technique allows

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Repotting set on a table in a garden in summer, FranceRepotting set on a table in a garden in summer, FranceRepotting set on a table in a garden in summer, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Repotting set on a table in a garden in summer, France

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Repotting set on a table in a garden in summer, FranceRepotting set on a table in a garden in summer, FranceRepotting set on a table in a garden in summer, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Repotting set on a table in a garden in summer, France

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Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán,

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Chilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileChilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileChilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Chilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII

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Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán,

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Samples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSamples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSamples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Samples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss.

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Sampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092982

Sampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the

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Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092976

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy)

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Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092972

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy)

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Cores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092970

Cores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the

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Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) samples a core in the laboratory.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) samples a core in the laboratory.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) samples a core in the laboratory.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092963

Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New

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Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Sample collected in a specimen, biometry carried out by a technician from the Saumon Rhin association on a wild salmon caught during the return migration on the Rhine, Gambsheim fish pass, Bas-Rhin, FranceAtlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Sample collected in a specimen, biometry carried out by a technician from the Saumon Rhin association on a wild salmon caught during the return migration on the Rhine, Gambsheim fish pass, Bas-Rhin, FranceAtlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Sample collected in a specimen, biometry carried out by a technician from the Saumon Rhin association on a wild salmon caught during the return migration on the Rhine, Gambsheim fish pass, Bas-Rhin, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Sample collected in a specimen,

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The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura,

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The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the

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Common stick insect (Carausius morosus) on white backgroundCommon stick insect (Carausius morosus) on white backgroundCommon stick insect (Carausius morosus) on white background© Marc Pihet / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Common stick insect (Carausius morosus) on white background

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