+33 490 162 042 Call us
Facebook About us Français

Search result Laboratoire

  • Page
  • / 8

395 pictures found

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030219

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification MissionScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base FloridaScientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris Martens (front left), Dr.Niels Lindquist (left), UNC Chapel Hill and other members of the saturation diver team /2011 Ocean Acidification Mission© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1934217

Scientists in laboratory - Aquarius Reef Base Florida ; Dr. Chris

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxSeriesDownload low resolution image

Many lab mice.Many lab mice.Many lab mice.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2440334

Many lab mice.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, Greece© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2418484

Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, and Sophie Marinesque, optical engineer, observing plancton, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2417559

Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. dry lab o/b Tara: Christian

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2417250

Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398170

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398169

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398168

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398167

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against pests. Laboratory of extraction and analysis of active ingredients in New Caledonia.© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2398166

Extraction and analysis of active ingredients of fruits against

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Man in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceMan in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceMan in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2168403

Man in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, France

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Man in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceMan in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceMan in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2168394

Man in his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, France

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Artisan cleaning his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceArtisan cleaning his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, FranceArtisan cleaning his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2168390

Artisan cleaning his organic poultry slaughterhouse, Provence,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Laboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, FranceLaboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, FranceLaboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2168383

Laboratory for slaughtering organic poultry, Provence, France

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Laboratory mice (Mus musculus), NetherlandsLaboratory mice (Mus musculus), NetherlandsLaboratory mice (Mus musculus), Netherlands© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2124094

Laboratory mice (Mus musculus), Netherlands

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2105384

Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

In the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the AmazonIn the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the AmazonIn the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of pollinating insects that Giorgio Venturieri started 20 years ago, when he did research into the pollination of the Amazonian canopy, is today a reference even if it only brings together 1000 species. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2105335

In the Embrapa laboratory in Belém, the collection of

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094218

Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Chilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileChilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileChilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094217

Chilean Indigenous Tree Nursery, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, ChileEucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán, VIII Biobío Region, Chile© Jean-Claude Malausa / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2094216

Eucalyptus weevil farm in greenhouse, CONAF Laboratory, Chillán,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Samples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSamples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSamples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092985

Samples of carrots in the oven to calculate water loss.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Sampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaSampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092982

Sampling of a core in 1 cm sections. Laboratory of the

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) samples a core in the laboratory. Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092976

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy)

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaChristophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy) describes a core in the laboratory before sampling.Laboratory of the Multidisciplinary Pole of Matter and Environment in Noumea. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092972

Christophe Durlet (lecturer at the University of Burgundy)

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092970

Cores packed for laboratory return. Study of the impact of the

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2088005

The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, the laboratory, Arbois, Jura,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, FranceThe House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the stove in the laboratory, Arbois, Jura, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2088004

The House of Louis Pasteur Museum, bust of Louis Pasteur on the

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072308

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072307

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072306

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de l’observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo, situé à 2200 mètres d’altitude à La Réunion. C’est dans ce laboratoire que sont récoltés et analysés tous les échantillons et mesures atmosphériques effectués par les appareillages installés sur le toit de l’observatoire. L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072305

Michel Metzger, OPAR, travaille dans le laboratoire de

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire dispose de 4 lasers lidars dont 2 visibles (verts), et 2 invisibles pour l'oeil humain. Trois des lidars sont tirés à la verticale, et un à 45 degrés, destiné à mesurer le vent. (i) Un lidar est dédié à la mesure de la vapeur d’eau avec un grand téléscope de 1,20 m de diamètre et deux lasers couples. (ii) Trois autres LIDARS destinés à la mesure des profils verticaux de paramètres atmosphériques (dont un tiré à 45 degres, afin de realiser des mesures de vent). L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire dispose de 4 lasers lidars dont 2 visibles (verts), et 2 invisibles pour l'oeil humain. Trois des lidars sont tirés à la verticale, et un à 45 degrés, destiné à mesurer le vent. (i) Un lidar est dédié à la mesure de la vapeur d’eau avec un grand téléscope de 1,20 m de diamètre et deux lasers couples. (ii) Trois autres LIDARS destinés à la mesure des profils verticaux de paramètres atmosphériques (dont un tiré à 45 degres, afin de realiser des mesures de vent). L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire dispose de 4 lasers lidars dont 2 visibles (verts), et 2 invisibles pour l'oeil humain. Trois des lidars sont tirés à la verticale, et un à 45 degrés, destiné à mesurer le vent. (i) Un lidar est dédié à la mesure de la vapeur d’eau avec un grand téléscope de 1,20 m de diamètre et deux lasers couples. (ii) Trois autres LIDARS destinés à la mesure des profils verticaux de paramètres atmosphériques (dont un tiré à 45 degres, afin de realiser des mesures de vent). L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072301

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072300

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072299

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des 3 sites de mesure de l'OPAR (Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphère de La Réunion), est installé depuis octobre 2012 sur le Piton Maïdo à 2200 mètres d'altitude. Ce laboratoire est doté d'une instrumentation de télédétection active et passive, afin de réaliser sur le long terme des mesure de grande qualité des profils verticaux de nombreuses variables climatiques. Il permet de surveiller les paramètres de l'atmosphère et du climat dans un contexte de changement climatique accéléré, et bénéficie d'une situation uique dans l'hémisphère Sud tropical, où les observations sont extrêmement peu nombreuses. L'observatoire du Maido bénéficie de plusieurs intérêts majeurs. (1) Sa position en latitude pour l'étude des processus de transport stratosphériques. (2) son altitude permet de s'affranchir de la pollution, de l'humidité et de la lumière, et d'améliorer considérablement la qualité des mesures par télédétection pour l'étude de la composition chimique de l'atmosphère. Le bâtiment de l'observatoire du Maïdo répond aux normes HQE et son intégration paysagère est particulièrement soignée. C'est dans le contexte de  participation à plusieurs réseaux internationaux d'observations comme le NDACC (Network for the Detection of  Atmospheric Composition Changes) et GAW (Global Atmospheric Watching) que se positionnent les observations  réalisées à l'OPAR.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2072270

L'observatoire atmosphérique du Maïdo à La Réunion (l'un des

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Checking the body fat of a Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Checking the body fat of a Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Checking the body fat of a Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066765

Checking the body fat of a Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066744

Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri),

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066743

Searching for parasites on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri),

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Prospecting field for the selection of the sampling sites, Stéphane Garnier and Bruno Faivre, faculty Biogéosciences the laboratory of the University of Burgundy in the company of Lloyd Martin of the Department of Montserrat environment. Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Prospecting field for the selection of the sampling sites, Stéphane Garnier and Bruno Faivre, faculty Biogéosciences the laboratory of the University of Burgundy in the company of Lloyd Martin of the Department of Montserrat environment. Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Prospecting field for the selection of the sampling sites, Stéphane Garnier and Bruno Faivre, faculty Biogéosciences the laboratory of the University of Burgundy in the company of Lloyd Martin of the Department of Montserrat environment. Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066740

Prospecting field for the selection of the sampling sites,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Measuring tarsus on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Measuring tarsus on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Measuring tarsus on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by Bruno Faivre, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066718

Measuring tarsus on a Forest Thrush (Turdus lherminieri), by

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Registration of data about a bird,, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Registration of data about a bird,, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Registration of data about a bird,, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066703

Registration of data about a bird,, by Stéphane Garnier, a

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Formation of an agent of the Montserrat Environment Department, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Formation of an agent of the Montserrat Environment Department, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.Formation of an agent of the Montserrat Environment Department, by Stéphane Garnier, a research professor at Biogéosciences laboratory of the University of Burgundy, Island of Montserrat. The "Fragmentation and biological invasions" aims to study the effects of fragmentation on forest birds Caribbean.© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2066686

Formation of an agent of the Montserrat Environment Department,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Venom Venom taken right and left freeze-dried ; Laboratory Latoxan. Venom Venom taken right and left freeze-driedVenom Venom taken right and left freeze-dried ; Laboratory Latoxan. © Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030237

Venom Venom taken right and left freeze-dried ; Laboratory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. Scorpion's venom removalScorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. © Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030233

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. Scorpion's venom removalScorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. © Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030232

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. Scorpion's venom removalScorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine. © Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030231

Scorpion's venom removal ; Laboratory Alphabiotoxine.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory  ; Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ; Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030227

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ;

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory  ; Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ; Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030226

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ;

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory  ; Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ; Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
Non exclusive sale

2030225

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory ;

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Next page
1 / 8

Your request is processing. Please wait...

Galleries General conditions Legal notices Photographers area





Your request has been registered.

To use this feature you must first register or login.

Log in

To organize photos in lightboxes you must first register or login. Registration is FREE! Lightboxes allow you to categorize your photos, to keep them when you sign in and send them by email.

Log in

A Biosphoto authorization has to be granted prior using this feature. We'll get in touch shortly, please check that your contact info is up to date. Feel free to contact us in case of no answer during office hours (Paris time).

Delete permanently this lightbox?

Delete permanently all items?



The lightbox has been duplicated

The lightbox has been copied in your personal account

Your request has been registered. You will receive an e-mail shortly in order to download your images.

You can insert a comment that will appear within your downloads reports.





Your lightbox has been sent.

In case of modification, changes will be seen by your recipient.

If deleted, your lightbox won't be avalaible for your recipient anymore.