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1957 pictures found

Gabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486749

2486749

Gabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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Granite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGranite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGranite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486748

2486748

Granite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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Labradorite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionLabradorite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionLabradorite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , France. Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486747

2486747

Labradorite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of

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Garnet amphibolite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGarnet amphibolite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGarnet amphibolite thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486746

2486746

Garnet amphibolite thin section under cross-polarized light,

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Talc thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionTalc thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionTalc thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486745

2486745

Talc thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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Gabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , rolled block in the river Aube, France. Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486744

2486744

Gabbro thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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Gn,eiss thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGn,eiss thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collectionGn,eiss thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486743

2486743

Gn,eiss thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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Basalt thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Libya, Tripolitania Province, Mention : UniLaSalle collectionBasalt thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Libya, Tripolitania Province, Mention : UniLaSalle collectionBasalt thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view - FOV = 3.4 mm , Libya, Tripolitania Province, Mention : UniLaSalle collection© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2486742

2486742

Basalt thin section under cross-polarized light, Field of view -

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A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) prepares to dock with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit.A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) prepares to dock with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit.A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) prepares to dock with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484603

2484603

A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) prepares to dock with an

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This reusable crew capsule (RCC) is the artist's conception of one possible commercial solution for providing manned access to low Earth orbit. Like the Apollo Command and Service Modules of the 1970s, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a crewed capsule capable of returning safely to the Earth and a disposable service module that provides propulsion, electricity and storage for consumables. . . 10 feet long with a maximum diameter of 12 feet, the capsule has room for up to seven astronauts and is capable of docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft via the common berthing mechanism (CBM) on the capsule's front. The CBM features a hatch which can be opened to reveal a 50 inch diameter passage for crew/cargo transfer. The complete spacecraft is 26 feet long with solar voltaic panels spanning a total of 50 feet.
This reusable crew capsule (RCC) is the artist's conception of one possible commercial solution for providing manned access to low Earth orbit. Like the Apollo Command and Service Modules of the 1970s, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a crewed capsule capable of returning safely to the Earth and a disposable service module that provides propulsion, electricity and storage for consumables. . . 10 feet long with a maximum diameter of 12 feet, the capsule has room for up to seven astronauts and is capable of docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft via the common berthing mechanism (CBM) on the capsule's front. The CBM features a hatch which can be opened to reveal a 50 inch diameter passage for crew/cargo transfer. The complete spacecraft is 26 feet long with solar voltaic panels spanning a total of 50 feet. This reusable crew capsule (RCC) is the artist's conception of one possible commercial solution for providing manned access to low Earth orbit. Like the Apollo Command and Service Modules of the 1970s, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a crewed capsule capable of returning safely to the Earth and a disposable service module that provides propulsion, electricity and storage for consumables. . . 10 feet long with a maximum diameter of 12 feet, the capsule has room for up to seven astronauts and is capable of docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft via the common berthing mechanism (CBM) on the capsule's front. The CBM features a hatch which can be opened to reveal a 50 inch diameter passage for crew/cargo transfer. The complete spacecraft is 26 feet long with solar voltaic panels spanning a total of 50 feet. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484602

2484602

This reusable crew capsule (RCC) is the artist's conception of

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A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) docks with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit. Once docked this mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 70 feet.A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) docks with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit. Once docked this mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 70 feet.A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) docks with an orbital maintenance platform (OMP) in low Earth orbit. Once docked this mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 70 feet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484601

2484601

A manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) docks with an orbital

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An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit fires its ten liquid-propellant rocket thrusters in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit fires its ten liquid-propellant rocket thrusters in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit fires its ten liquid-propellant rocket thrusters in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484600

2484600

An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned

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This orbital maintenance platform (OMP) is the artist's conception of a possible solution for providing manned access to Earth-orbiting satellites for maintenance and repair. . . 45 feet tall with maximum diameter of 18 feet, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a 28-foot-long lower component in the style of an International Space Station (ISS) module containing a robotic arm and other tools for satellite maintenance and multi-thruster propulsion system, and an upper 12 x 12 foot pressurized component that includes a windowed cupola for manned operation of the maintenance tools. The pressurized component also includes hatches for extra-vehicular activities (EVA) should astronauts need to work outside the OMP. This orbital maintenance platform could provide manned access to low-Earth orbiting satellites formerly provided by the now-retired Space Shuttle, and to higher orbiting satellites (e.g., NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory) that have been out of reach to the Space Shuttle. 
This orbital maintenance platform (OMP) is the artist's conception of a possible solution for providing manned access to Earth-orbiting satellites for maintenance and repair. . . 45 feet tall with maximum diameter of 18 feet, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a 28-foot-long lower component in the style of an International Space Station (ISS) module containing a robotic arm and other tools for satellite maintenance and multi-thruster propulsion system, and an upper 12 x 12 foot pressurized component that includes a windowed cupola for manned operation of the maintenance tools. The pressurized component also includes hatches for extra-vehicular activities (EVA) should astronauts need to work outside the OMP. This orbital maintenance platform could provide manned access to low-Earth orbiting satellites formerly provided by the now-retired Space Shuttle, and to higher orbiting satellites (e.g., NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory) that have been out of reach to the Space Shuttle. This orbital maintenance platform (OMP) is the artist's conception of a possible solution for providing manned access to Earth-orbiting satellites for maintenance and repair. . . 45 feet tall with maximum diameter of 18 feet, this self-propelled and reusable spacecraft is composed of two basic parts: a 28-foot-long lower component in the style of an International Space Station (ISS) module containing a robotic arm and other tools for satellite maintenance and multi-thruster propulsion system, and an upper 12 x 12 foot pressurized component that includes a windowed cupola for manned operation of the maintenance tools. The pressurized component also includes hatches for extra-vehicular activities (EVA) should astronauts need to work outside the OMP. This orbital maintenance platform could provide manned access to low-Earth orbiting satellites formerly provided by the now-retired Space Shuttle, and to higher orbiting satellites (e.g., NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory) that have been out of reach to the Space Shuttle. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484597

2484597

This orbital maintenance platform (OMP) is the artist's

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An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docks an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docks an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docks an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This mobile spacecraft system will have a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484596

2484596

An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docks an orbiting booster

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An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) approaches an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This booster is 40 feet long, 17 feet in diameter and employs a single liquid-propellant rocket engine. 
An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) approaches an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This booster is 40 feet long, 17 feet in diameter and employs a single liquid-propellant rocket engine. An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) approaches an orbiting booster in low Earth orbit. Once connected the booster will loft the OMP to a gravitationally stable Lagrangian point about 700 thousand miles beyond the orbit of the Earth's Moon. This booster is 40 feet long, 17 feet in diameter and employs a single liquid-propellant rocket engine. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484593

2484593

An orbital maintenance platform (OMP) approaches an orbiting

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A manned orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit ignites an auxiliary liquid-propellant rocket booster in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). At this configuration the spacecraft has a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.A manned orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit ignites an auxiliary liquid-propellant rocket booster in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). At this configuration the spacecraft has a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.A manned orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned reusable crew capsule (RCC) in low Earth orbit ignites an auxiliary liquid-propellant rocket booster in order to lift it to a far higher Earth orbit for an eventual rendezvous with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). At this configuration the spacecraft has a total length of 110 feet with a maximum diameter of 18 feet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484590

2484590

A manned orbital maintenance platform (OMP) docked with a manned

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This is how auroras on Jupiter's north pole might look from a distance of about a quarter million miles. On the Sunlit side can be seen churning clouds of ammonia ice, ammonium hydrosulfide, and water ice. The dark side reveals a dazzling aurora and brilliant flashes of lightning hundreds of times brighter than lightning on Earth. . Unlike Earth's north and south pole auroras which are powered by charged particles from the Sun, auroras on Jupiter are driven by particles emitted by Jupiter's volcanic moon Io. Io in fact leaves a distinct auroral footprint on Jupiter's poles, seen here as a whitish dot with a trailing, comet-like tail at the seven 0'clock position. Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede also have corresponding, albeit fainter footprints on the far side of the larger auroral oval.This is how auroras on Jupiter's north pole might look from a distance of about a quarter million miles. On the Sunlit side can be seen churning clouds of ammonia ice, ammonium hydrosulfide, and water ice. The dark side reveals a dazzling aurora and brilliant flashes of lightning hundreds of times brighter than lightning on Earth. . Unlike Earth's north and south pole auroras which are powered by charged particles from the Sun, auroras on Jupiter are driven by particles emitted by Jupiter's volcanic moon Io. Io in fact leaves a distinct auroral footprint on Jupiter's poles, seen here as a whitish dot with a trailing, comet-like tail at the seven 0'clock position. Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede also have corresponding, albeit fainter footprints on the far side of the larger auroral oval.This is how auroras on Jupiter's north pole might look from a distance of about a quarter million miles. On the Sunlit side can be seen churning clouds of ammonia ice, ammonium hydrosulfide, and water ice. The dark side reveals a dazzling aurora and brilliant flashes of lightning hundreds of times brighter than lightning on Earth. . Unlike Earth's north and south pole auroras which are powered by charged particles from the Sun, auroras on Jupiter are driven by particles emitted by Jupiter's volcanic moon Io. Io in fact leaves a distinct auroral footprint on Jupiter's poles, seen here as a whitish dot with a trailing, comet-like tail at the seven 0'clock position. Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede also have corresponding, albeit fainter footprints on the far side of the larger auroral oval.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484572

2484572

This is how auroras on Jupiter's north pole might look from a

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An Orion class command module, upper right, prepares to dock with a Phobos mission rocket in Earth orbit. Below at a distance of approximately 200 miles is the eastern Sahara desert. Lower left are the crew quarters for the 16 month mission.An Orion class command module, upper right, prepares to dock with a Phobos mission rocket in Earth orbit. Below at a distance of approximately 200 miles is the eastern Sahara desert. Lower left are the crew quarters for the 16 month mission.An Orion class command module, upper right, prepares to dock with a Phobos mission rocket in Earth orbit. Below at a distance of approximately 200 miles is the eastern Sahara desert. Lower left are the crew quarters for the 16 month mission.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484549

2484549

An Orion class command module, upper right, prepares to dock with

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Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their atmospheres. While Venus is roughly the same size and density as the Earth, it is otherwise a very different world. Earth's surface is a varied one, with liquid water covering three quarters of its surface. Those areas not under water have been highly modified by plate tectonics, weather, and life itself. Venus on the other hand is far too hot to host liquid water. Volcanoes, massive lava flows and the occasional impact crater characterize its surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484543

2484543

Artist's concept showing Earth and Venus without their

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Artist's concept of a space tug docked with a lunar lander. With the space tug firmly docked with the lunar lander, the two will function as a single spacecraft for the duration of a 3-day trip to the moon. The pair would likely spend some time in Earth orbit prior to departure, checking systems and preparing the lander for its eventual journey to the Moon's surface. The lunar lander pictured here has capacity for a crew of four plus cargo. The space tug itself could have a crew of two, making the total crew capacity of the joined spacecraft about the same as today's Space Shuttle.Artist's concept of a space tug docked with a lunar lander. With the space tug firmly docked with the lunar lander, the two will function as a single spacecraft for the duration of a 3-day trip to the moon. The pair would likely spend some time in Earth orbit prior to departure, checking systems and preparing the lander for its eventual journey to the Moon's surface. The lunar lander pictured here has capacity for a crew of four plus cargo. The space tug itself could have a crew of two, making the total crew capacity of the joined spacecraft about the same as today's Space Shuttle.Artist's concept of a space tug docked with a lunar lander. With the space tug firmly docked with the lunar lander, the two will function as a single spacecraft for the duration of a 3-day trip to the moon. The pair would likely spend some time in Earth orbit prior to departure, checking systems and preparing the lander for its eventual journey to the Moon's surface. The lunar lander pictured here has capacity for a crew of four plus cargo. The space tug itself could have a crew of two, making the total crew capacity of the joined spacecraft about the same as today's Space Shuttle.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484538

2484538

Artist's concept of a space tug docked with a lunar lander. With

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Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Pluto has a diameter that is less than a fifth of the Earth's and is smaller than Earth's moon. Pluto's moon Charon is over half the size of Pluto itself, leading astronomers to originally classify the Pluto-Charon system as a double planet. They are also considered binary planets because the smaller Charon doesn't actually orbit around Pluto, rather Pluto and Charon orbit a common gravitational center (the barycenter) located above Pluto's surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484513

2484513

Artist's concept of the Earth, Pluto, Charon, and Earth's moon to

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Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one quarter the diameter of the Earth and has only one percent the mass. If you weigh 180 pounds on the Earth, you would weigh only 30 pounds on the moon.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484501

2484501

Artist's concept of the Earth and its moon. The Moon is one

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Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to scale (from left to right). Mercury is one third the diameter of the Earth, and is the closest planet to the Sun. Mercury is somewhat larger than the Earth's Moon and is believed to be composed mostly of iron and rock, making it considerably denser than the Moon.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484498

2484498

Artist's cocnept showing the Earth, Mercury and Earth's moon to

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Artist's concept of how Mars and its tiny satellite Phobos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from Phobos' surface. In this image Phobos is passing over the low martian plains of Syrtis Major. Below the plains extending down to Mars' terminator and beyond is the heavily cratered Terra Sabaea. Clouds of water-ice crystals are forming at the terminator between light and dark. . Phobos is the larger of Mars' two satellites, with a length of about 16 miles and about 11 miles across its smallest dimension. Phobos does not have enough mass for gravity to pull it into a uniform sphere like the larger satellites and planets in the Solar System. . Phobos may be an asteroid long ago captured by Mars' gravity, orbiting a mere 5,800 miles above Mars' surface, making it the closest satellite to its host planet in the Solar System. Phobos' orbit is so low that it completes one revolution in less than eight hours, easily outpacing by threefold Mars' rotation period of 24 hours, 40 minutes. The resulting tidal forces are causing Phobos' altitude to decay at the relatively rapid rate of 6 feet per century; in about 50 million years Phobos will either be torn apart by Mars' gravity or crash into the martian surface.Artist's concept of how Mars and its tiny satellite Phobos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from Phobos' surface. In this image Phobos is passing over the low martian plains of Syrtis Major. Below the plains extending down to Mars' terminator and beyond is the heavily cratered Terra Sabaea. Clouds of water-ice crystals are forming at the terminator between light and dark. . Phobos is the larger of Mars' two satellites, with a length of about 16 miles and about 11 miles across its smallest dimension. Phobos does not have enough mass for gravity to pull it into a uniform sphere like the larger satellites and planets in the Solar System. . Phobos may be an asteroid long ago captured by Mars' gravity, orbiting a mere 5,800 miles above Mars' surface, making it the closest satellite to its host planet in the Solar System. Phobos' orbit is so low that it completes one revolution in less than eight hours, easily outpacing by threefold Mars' rotation period of 24 hours, 40 minutes. The resulting tidal forces are causing Phobos' altitude to decay at the relatively rapid rate of 6 feet per century; in about 50 million years Phobos will either be torn apart by Mars' gravity or crash into the martian surface.Artist's concept of how Mars and its tiny satellite Phobos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from Phobos' surface. In this image Phobos is passing over the low martian plains of Syrtis Major. Below the plains extending down to Mars' terminator and beyond is the heavily cratered Terra Sabaea. Clouds of water-ice crystals are forming at the terminator between light and dark. . Phobos is the larger of Mars' two satellites, with a length of about 16 miles and about 11 miles across its smallest dimension. Phobos does not have enough mass for gravity to pull it into a uniform sphere like the larger satellites and planets in the Solar System. . Phobos may be an asteroid long ago captured by Mars' gravity, orbiting a mere 5,800 miles above Mars' surface, making it the closest satellite to its host planet in the Solar System. Phobos' orbit is so low that it completes one revolution in less than eight hours, easily outpacing by threefold Mars' rotation period of 24 hours, 40 minutes. The resulting tidal forces are causing Phobos' altitude to decay at the relatively rapid rate of 6 feet per century; in about 50 million years Phobos will either be torn apart by Mars' gravity or crash into the martian surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484485

2484485

Artist's concept of how Mars and its tiny satellite Phobos might

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Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the Earth. Mars' diameter is half that of the Earth's, it has ten percent the mass and is 1.5 times the distance from the Sun. While the Earth is host to oceans of liquid water and has a relatively dense water-rich atmosphere, Mars is exceedingly dry, cold and, as far as we know, sterile. It is thought to have lost most of its water to space a long time ago, and any that remains is frozen at the poles and locked deep in the ground as permafrost.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484484

2484484

Artist's concept comparing the size of Mars with that of the

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Artist' concept showing Mars and its even smaller satellite Deimos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from the surface of Deimos. Deimos is seen passing over Acidalia Planitia, an albedo feature that has been observed by Earth-bound astronomers since the 19th century. To the southwest are the fog-filled canyons of Valles Marineris, the westernmost of which are still in darkness. Beyond Mars, immediately to the left of its night side, is Phobos at a distance of 20,000 miles. The two bright objects in the lower left are the stars Beta Gruis and Al Nair in the southern constellation Grus. . Deimos does not possess enough mass to pull itself into a sphere. Its shape is oblong with a length of about 10 miles and only 6 miles wide at its smallest dimension. Orbiting 14,600 miles above Mars' surface, Deimos completes one revolution every 30 hours.Artist' concept showing Mars and its even smaller satellite Deimos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from the surface of Deimos. Deimos is seen passing over Acidalia Planitia, an albedo feature that has been observed by Earth-bound astronomers since the 19th century. To the southwest are the fog-filled canyons of Valles Marineris, the westernmost of which are still in darkness. Beyond Mars, immediately to the left of its night side, is Phobos at a distance of 20,000 miles. The two bright objects in the lower left are the stars Beta Gruis and Al Nair in the southern constellation Grus. . Deimos does not possess enough mass to pull itself into a sphere. Its shape is oblong with a length of about 10 miles and only 6 miles wide at its smallest dimension. Orbiting 14,600 miles above Mars' surface, Deimos completes one revolution every 30 hours.Artist' concept showing Mars and its even smaller satellite Deimos might appear from a distance of about 100 miles from the surface of Deimos. Deimos is seen passing over Acidalia Planitia, an albedo feature that has been observed by Earth-bound astronomers since the 19th century. To the southwest are the fog-filled canyons of Valles Marineris, the westernmost of which are still in darkness. Beyond Mars, immediately to the left of its night side, is Phobos at a distance of 20,000 miles. The two bright objects in the lower left are the stars Beta Gruis and Al Nair in the southern constellation Grus. . Deimos does not possess enough mass to pull itself into a sphere. Its shape is oblong with a length of about 10 miles and only 6 miles wide at its smallest dimension. Orbiting 14,600 miles above Mars' surface, Deimos completes one revolution every 30 hours.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484483

2484483

Artist' concept showing Mars and its even smaller satellite

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Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484472

2484472

Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same

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An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484471

2484471

An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of

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Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter (left) with that of the Earth (right). Jupiter's diameter is over ten times greater than the Earth's, it has over 300 times the mass, and is five times further from the Sun than the Earth. . Jupiter is so large that its famous Great Red Spot (actually a giant, hurricane-like storm that's at least 400 years old) would easily swallow the Earth. Jupiter spins so fast on its axis that it bulges noticeably at its equator (a day on Jupiter is about ten hours long).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484470

2484470

Artist's concept comparing the size of the gas giant Jupiter

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Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago.
Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago. Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out above the Earth and it's moon, showing their comparative sizes. From left to right, in order of their distances from Jupiter: Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. These moons, also known as the Galilean moons, were first observed by the Italian astronomer Galileo over 400 years ago. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484462

2484462

Artist's concept of Jupiter's four largest satellites laid out

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Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites, however, it is quite diminutive when compared with the Earth and Earth's Moon. With a radius of only 160 miles, Enceladus could rest in the Gulf of Mexico with plenty of room to spare. Enceladus is one of the brightest objects in the Solar System. Where Earth's Moon has a surface reflectively about the same as charcoal, Enceladus is covered in water ice that reflects sunlight like freshly fallen snow.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484459

2484459

Enceladus is considered one of Saturn's major satellites,

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In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. Eris was discovered in 2003 and is now the largest of the known dwarf planets. It is believed to be slightly more massive than Pluto and follows a highly eccentric orbit that alternately brings it as close as the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and as far as over twice Pluto's furthest distance from the Sun. . Pluto, a Kuiper object, was demoted to the status of dwarf planet in 2006 when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reviewed Pluto's status in light of the recently discovered Eris, also a Kuiper object, but somewhat larger than Pluto. Pluto and Eris are also considered trans-Neptunian objects, or trans-Neptunian dwarf planets, because they orbit the Sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484452

2484452

In this image, from left to right, are the dwarf planets Ceres,

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3D rendering of an Earth golf ball on tee in the grass, close-up.3D rendering of an Earth golf ball on tee in the grass, close-up.3D rendering of an Earth golf ball on tee in the grass, close-up.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484362

2484362

3D rendering of an Earth golf ball on tee in the grass, close-up.

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Galactic night scene on a distant planet.Galactic night scene on a distant planet.Galactic night scene on a distant planet.© Reinhold Wittich / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484087

2484087

Galactic night scene on a distant planet.

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Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.© Rhys Taylor / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484053

2484053

Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to

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Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to the same scale.© Rhys Taylor / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484052

2484052

Galaxy size comparison chart. A selection of galaxies shown to

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Galaxy sizes compared to IC 1101, the largest known galaxy.Galaxy sizes compared to IC 1101, the largest known galaxy.Galaxy sizes compared to IC 1101, the largest known galaxy.© Rhys Taylor / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484051

2484051

Galaxy sizes compared to IC 1101, the largest known galaxy.

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Mining colony on an asteroid.Mining colony on an asteroid.Mining colony on an asteroid.© Tobias Roetsch / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484009

2484009

Mining colony on an asteroid.

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Vision of a black hole destroying a sun.Vision of a black hole destroying a sun.Vision of a black hole destroying a sun.© Tobias Roetsch / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484008

2484008

Vision of a black hole destroying a sun.

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An apocalyptic scene showing a gravity caused destruction of a moon.An apocalyptic scene showing a gravity caused destruction of a moon.An apocalyptic scene showing a gravity caused destruction of a moon.© Tobias Roetsch / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484007

2484007

An apocalyptic scene showing a gravity caused destruction of a

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In 500 years from today, the world has changed. Europe is burning in war, climate changed completely and China and India are the new global player.In 500 years from today, the world has changed. Europe is burning in war, climate changed completely and China and India are the new global player.In 500 years from today, the world has changed. Europe is burning in war, climate changed completely and China and India are the new global player.© Tobias Roetsch / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484006

2484006

In 500 years from today, the world has changed. Europe is burning

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Artist's view of Earth's planetary rings in Polynesia on the Tropic of Cancer. The large oval in the middle of the ring is Earth's shadow.Artist's view of Earth's planetary rings in Polynesia on the Tropic of Cancer. The large oval in the middle of the ring is Earth's shadow.Artist's view of Earth's planetary rings in Polynesia on the Tropic of Cancer. The large oval in the middle of the ring is Earth's shadow.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484005

2484005

Artist's view of Earth's planetary rings in Polynesia on the

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Earth with rings during an equinox, with the rings fading nearly midway through the sky. The perspective here is from northern Nevada or Utah.Earth with rings during an equinox, with the rings fading nearly midway through the sky. The perspective here is from northern Nevada or Utah.Earth with rings during an equinox, with the rings fading nearly midway through the sky. The perspective here is from northern Nevada or Utah.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484004

2484004

Earth with rings during an equinox, with the rings fading nearly

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Sky views from the equator on a hypothetical ringed Earth would look like this. A bright line going from horizon to horizon directly overhead. The setting here is Quito, Ecuador, where an observer would be in the same plane as the rings.Sky views from the equator on a hypothetical ringed Earth would look like this. A bright line going from horizon to horizon directly overhead. The setting here is Quito, Ecuador, where an observer would be in the same plane as the rings.Sky views from the equator on a hypothetical ringed Earth would look like this. A bright line going from horizon to horizon directly overhead. The setting here is Quito, Ecuador, where an observer would be in the same plane as the rings.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484003

2484003

Sky views from the equator on a hypothetical ringed Earth would

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Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over the Capitol building in Washington D.C.Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over the Capitol building in Washington D.C.Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over the Capitol building in Washington D.C.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484002

2484002

Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over the Capitol

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Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over Guatemala.Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over Guatemala.Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over Guatemala.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484001

2484001

Artist's concept of Earth's planetary rings over Guatemala.

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A larger than life depiction of the full moon rising above a sand dune at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico.A larger than life depiction of the full moon rising above a sand dune at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico.A larger than life depiction of the full moon rising above a sand dune at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico.© Roth Ritter / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483849

2483849

A larger than life depiction of the full moon rising above a sand

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Futuristic illustration concept depicting astronaut in orbit over earth-like planet system with space station.Futuristic illustration concept depicting astronaut in orbit over earth-like planet system with space station.Futuristic illustration concept depicting astronaut in orbit over earth-like planet system with space station.© Roth Ritter / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483845

2483845

Futuristic illustration concept depicting astronaut in orbit over

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Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.© Philip Hart / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483602

2483602

Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway,

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Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway, Queensland, Australia.© Philip Hart / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483601

2483601

Solar eclipse composite with observers, Mulligan Highway,

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