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Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) porpoising in front of a monumental iceberg, AntarcticaAdélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) porpoising in front of a monumental iceberg, AntarcticaAdélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) porpoising in front of a monumental iceberg, Antarctica© Raphaël Sané / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

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Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) porpoising in front of a

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Red Indian fish, Pataecus fronto. Note big pectoral fins that look like 8 finger hands and help the fish to move and grab among the sponges and corals. It is a relatively rare species and we don't know much about it's biology. But it has been discovered that, like the snakes, it regularly moults. When it grows, or the skin is old, it changes it as if it were a used outfit, in one swoop, getting rid in the meantime of the parasites and the encrusting weeds. Australia. Composite imageRed Indian fish, Pataecus fronto. Note big pectoral fins that look like 8 finger hands and help the fish to move and grab among the sponges and corals. It is a relatively rare species and we don't know much about it's biology. But it has been discovered that, like the snakes, it regularly moults. When it grows, or the skin is old, it changes it as if it were a used outfit, in one swoop, getting rid in the meantime of the parasites and the encrusting weeds. Australia. Composite imageRed Indian fish, Pataecus fronto. Note big pectoral fins that look like 8 finger hands and help the fish to move and grab among the sponges and corals. It is a relatively rare species and we don't know much about it's biology. But it has been discovered that, like the snakes, it regularly moults. When it grows, or the skin is old, it changes it as if it were a used outfit, in one swoop, getting rid in the meantime of the parasites and the encrusting weeds. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Red Indian fish, Pataecus fronto. Note big pectoral fins that

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Multi-exposures of Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) in flight, Quebec, CanadaMulti-exposures of Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) in flight, Quebec, CanadaMulti-exposures of Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) in flight, Quebec, Canada© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Multi-exposures of Canadian snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) in

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Synaptid skin under a microscope; Synaptid (Synapta digitata) Polarized light illumination with X 200 magnification.Synaptid skin under a microscope; Synaptid (Synapta digitata) Polarized light illumination with X 200 magnification.Synaptid skin under a microscope; Synaptid (Synapta digitata) Polarized light illumination with X 200 magnification.© Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Synaptid skin under a microscope; Synaptid (Synapta digitata)

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White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite imageWhite-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with characteristic circular nest in the sand on the foreground. Males never reuse a nest. The spectacular nest with 2 meters in diameter is excavated on the sand to attract the females with the impressive design. Amami Oshima Island. Japan Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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White-spotted pufferfish, Torquigener albomaculosus. Male with

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Lionfish (Pterois sp), Indian OceanLionfish (Pterois sp), Indian OceanLionfish (Pterois sp), Indian Ocean© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Lionfish (Pterois sp), Indian Ocean

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Mouth of Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus), West Australia, Ningaloo Reef - Indian Ocean.Mouth of Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus), West Australia, Ningaloo Reef - Indian Ocean.Mouth of Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus), West Australia, Ningaloo Reef - Indian Ocean.© Jeffrey Rotman / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Mouth of Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus), West Australia, Ningaloo

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Giant Pacific Octopus (Octopus dofleini) inking, British Columbia, Canada - Northern Pacific Ocean.Giant Pacific Octopus (Octopus dofleini) inking, British Columbia, Canada - Northern Pacific Ocean.Giant Pacific Octopus (Octopus dofleini) inking, British Columbia, Canada - Northern Pacific Ocean.© Jeffrey Rotman / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2118654

Giant Pacific Octopus (Octopus dofleini) inking, British

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Tail of a sperm whale diving under the rainbow (Physeter macrocephalus), Vulnerable (IUCN), Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Digital composed.Tail of a sperm whale diving under the rainbow (Physeter macrocephalus), Vulnerable (IUCN), Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Digital composed.Tail of a sperm whale diving under the rainbow (Physeter macrocephalus), Vulnerable (IUCN), Dominica, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Digital composed.© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Tail of a sperm whale diving under the rainbow (Physeter

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King of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageKing of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageKing of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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King of herrings, Regalecus glesne. Composite image. Portugal.

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Red Kites in flight over the highway, UK- Composite image. iM40 going through ChilternsRed Kites in flight over the highway, UK- Composite image. iM40 going through ChilternsRed Kites in flight over the highway, UK- Composite image. iM40 going through Chilterns© Mike Lane / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Red Kites in flight over the highway, UK- Composite image. iM40

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Degradation stormy night on the Fort Louvois - France ; Many storms have succeeded on the night of May 4 to 5, 2015 at Fort Louvois.<br>Overlays 5 photos 30 seconds of exposure is 2 minutes 30.Degradation stormy night on the Fort Louvois - FranceDegradation stormy night on the Fort Louvois - France ; Many storms have succeeded on the night of May 4 to 5, 2015 at Fort Louvois.
Overlays 5 photos 30 seconds of exposure is 2 minutes 30.
© Xavier Delorme / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Degradation stormy night on the Fort Louvois - France ; Many

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Lightning and wind in the eveningin  countryside - France ; A wind turbine is struck by lightning and another an upward leader on a light.<br>The impact of lightning that hits the ground is 180 meters away from the photographer.<br>Two pictures superimposed 30 secondsLightning and wind in the eveningin countryside - FranceLightning and wind in the eveningin countryside - France ; A wind turbine is struck by lightning and another an upward leader on a light.
The impact of lightning that hits the ground is 180 meters away from the photographer.
Two pictures superimposed 30 seconds
© Xavier Delorme / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Lightning and wind in the eveningin countryside - France ; A

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Storm over a mall at night - France  ; Overlay 3 photos 30 seconds equivalent to a period of 1 minutes 30 seconds. Storm over a mall at night - France Storm over a mall at night - France ; Overlay 3 photos 30 seconds equivalent to a period of 1 minutes 30 seconds. © Xavier Delorme / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Storm over a mall at night - France ; Overlay 3 photos 30

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Cheetah Gazelle - KenyaCheetah Gazelle - KenyaCheetah Gazelle - Kenya© Gérard Lacz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1991713

Cheetah Gazelle - Kenya

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Cheetah - AfricaCheetah - AfricaCheetah - Africa© Gérard Lacz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1991712

Cheetah - Africa

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Caterpillar observed by Snails - France Caterpillar observed by Snails - France Caterpillar observed by Snails - France © Benoît Personnaz / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Caterpillar observed by Snails - France

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Chamois on the Vosges ridges at sunrise FranceChamois on the Vosges ridges at sunrise FranceChamois on the Vosges ridges at sunrise France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Chamois on the Vosges ridges at sunrise France

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SheepsSheepsSheeps© Pascal Foulon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Sheeps

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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Sponge spicules Chondrilla nucula polarized light 

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Image processing of a picture of wild salsifyImage processing of a picture of wild salsifyImage processing of a picture of wild salsify© H. Curtis / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Image processing of a picture of wild salsify

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Red deer in the morning mist Sierra Morena AndalusiaRed deer in the morning mist Sierra Morena AndalusiaRed deer in the morning mist Sierra Morena Andalusia© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Red deer in the morning mist Sierra Morena Andalusia

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium ComorosFemale green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Female green turtle swimming above a herbarium Comoros

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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscopeSpicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in polarized light with blade compensatory gypsum, magnified x 100. © Christian Gautier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spicules of sea cuncumber under microscope ; Lighting in

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Aurora borealis over taiga covered with snow FinlandAurora borealis over taiga covered with snow FinlandAurora borealis over taiga covered with snow Finland© Christophe Sidamon-Pesson / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Aurora borealis over taiga covered with snow Finland

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Grant's zebra migration on the plains of the Mara KenyaGrant's zebra migration on the plains of the Mara KenyaGrant's zebra migration on the plains of the Mara Kenya© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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Grant's zebra migration on the plains of the Mara Kenya

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Bull of the Camargue in front of the sun France [AT] ; assembly studio [AT]Bull of the Camargue in front of the sun France [AT]Bull of the Camargue in front of the sun France [AT] ; assembly studio [AT]© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bull of the Camargue in front of the sun France [AT] ; assembly

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Dendrocygnes widowers taken with the Madagascar against-moonDendrocygnes widowers taken with the Madagascar against-moonDendrocygnes widowers taken with the Madagascar against-moon© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dendrocygnes widowers taken with the Madagascar against-moon

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Num-Ti-Jah Lodge Star Trails - Banff NP Alberta Canada ; 	A composite of 233 images, taken with the Canon 5D MkII and 16-35mm lens, at Bow Lake in Banff, showing circumpolar star trails across the sky looking north over Num-Ti-Jah Lodge. Each image was 50 seconds, taken at 1s intervals at ISO 1250 and at f/4. Stacked in Photoshop using Chris Schur's Photoshop Action.Num-Ti-Jah Lodge Star Trails - Banff NP Alberta CanadaNum-Ti-Jah Lodge Star Trails - Banff NP Alberta Canada ; A composite of 233 images, taken with the Canon 5D MkII and 16-35mm lens, at Bow Lake in Banff, showing circumpolar star trails across the sky looking north over Num-Ti-Jah Lodge. Each image was 50 seconds, taken at 1s intervals at ISO 1250 and at f/4. Stacked in Photoshop using Chris Schur's Photoshop Action.© Alan Dyer / Visual and Written - Photo Collection / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Num-Ti-Jah Lodge Star Trails - Banff NP Alberta Canada ; A

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Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal

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Leopard Panthera pardus lying down on rock at sunset in Kruger National park, South Africa - Composite imageLeopard Panthera pardus lying down on rock at sunset in Kruger National park, South Africa - Composite imageLeopard Panthera pardus lying down on rock at sunset in Kruger National park, South Africa - Composite image© Patrice Correia / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Leopard Panthera pardus lying down on rock at sunset in Kruger

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Serotine bat (Plecotus auritus)in flight at night, Salamanca, Castilla y León, SpainSerotine bat (Plecotus auritus)in flight at night, Salamanca, Castilla y León, SpainSerotine bat (Plecotus auritus)in flight at night, Salamanca, Castilla y León, Spain© Mario Cea Sanchez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Serotine bat (Plecotus auritus)in flight at night, Salamanca,

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Great Mormon (Papilio memnon) caterpillar on Citrus, Greenhouse of the Botanical Garden of Nancy, Lorraine, FranceGreat Mormon (Papilio memnon) caterpillar on Citrus, Greenhouse of the Botanical Garden of Nancy, Lorraine, FranceGreat Mormon (Papilio memnon) caterpillar on Citrus, Greenhouse of the Botanical Garden of Nancy, Lorraine, France© Stéphane Vitzthum / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Great Mormon (Papilio memnon) caterpillar on Citrus, Greenhouse

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly of 4 images (M). Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Cestid ctenophores. Assembly

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian fans on reef wall. Stitched image, D: 17 m, Joelle’s Reef, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Sponges and Gorgonian

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view Orthomosaic from 3D photogrammetry (13500 x 10000 px). D: 15 m Kimbe Bay, papua New Guinea, Coral growth on this wreck is from a period of 74 years ! The ZERO, is a Japanese WW2 fighter plane wreck. This Zero wreck was discovered in January 2000 by local William Nuli while he was freediving for sea cucumbers. He asked the Walindi Plantation Resort dive team if they might know what it was, and when they investigated they uncovered the intact wreck of a Zero fighter, resting on a sedimented bottom in 15 m depth. This World War II Japanese fighter is almost completely intact. The plane is believed to have been ditched, the pilot is believed to have survived, but was never found on the island. He never returned home. Maybe he disappeared in the jungle… On 26th December 1943, during the battle of Cape Gloucester, the Japanese pilot made an emergency landing, ditching his Mitsubishi A6M Zero plane into the sea approximately 100m off West New Britain Province. The plane was piloted by PO1 Tomiharu Honda of the 204st Kōkūtai. His fate is unknown but it is believed the he made a controlled water landing after running out of fuel and survived. Although he failed to return to his unit, the plane was found with the throttle and trim controls both set for landing and the canopy was open. There are no visible bullet holes or other shrapnel damage and the plane is still virtually intact after over 70 years underwater. It is a A6M2 Model 21 Zero, made famous for its use in Kamikaze attacks by the Japanese Imperial Navy. The wreck has the Manufacture Number 8224 and was built by Nakajima in late August 1942.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Zero wreck, vertical view

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Tara at anchorage near local village, Normanby Island, Papua New-Guinea, H: 264,7 m, stitched panorama 8599 x 2971 px mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions FoundationTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Tara at anchorage near local village, Normanby Island, Papua New-Guinea, H: 264,7 m, stitched panorama 8599 x 2971 px mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions FoundationTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Tara at anchorage near local village, Normanby Island, Papua New-Guinea, H: 264,7 m, stitched panorama 8599 x 2971 px mandatory credit line: Photo: Christoph Gerigk, drone pilot: Guillaume Bourdin - Tara Expeditions Foundation© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Tara at anchorage near

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen

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Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FrancePumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FrancePumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) on white background, Sewen Lake,

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) catch, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) catch, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) catch, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) catch, Sewen Lake, Doller

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FranceEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis) on white background, Sewen

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Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FrancePumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, FrancePumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley,

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France, Digital assemblyEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France, Digital assemblyEuropean perch (Perca fluviatilis), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley, Alsace, France, Digital assembly© Bruno Mathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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European perch (Perca fluviatilis), Sewen Lake, Doller Valley,

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Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection EnglandAerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection EnglandAerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409057

Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409056

Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409055

Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408019

Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408007

Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407999

Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus,

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407995

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Sawflies (false caterpillar) Tenthredinidae Group of sawflies larva (Tenthredinidae) eating leaves Russia Federation, Krasnodar region, the vicinity of the city of NovorossiyskSawflies (false caterpillar) Tenthredinidae Group of sawflies larva (Tenthredinidae) eating leaves Russia Federation, Krasnodar region, the vicinity of the city of NovorossiyskSawflies (false caterpillar) Tenthredinidae Group of sawflies larva (Tenthredinidae) eating leaves Russia Federation, Krasnodar region, the vicinity of the city of Novorossiysk© Aleksey Volkov / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Russian Federation
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2407959

Sawflies (false caterpillar) Tenthredinidae Group of sawflies

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Avalanche in AntarcticaAvalanche in AntarcticaAvalanche in Antarctica© Raphaël Sané / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2407243

Avalanche in Antarctica

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405138

Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405133

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405132

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405131

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although

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Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405123

Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, on estuary environment. Occurs

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Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite imageSciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing zone. Occurs usually over sand and sandy mud bottoms in coastal waters and estuaries. Abundant in surf zone. By the 1980s, this species was overexploited due to unsustainable take by commercial fisheries in U.S. waters. Scientists believe that the characteristic black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape. USA - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405122

Sciaenops ocellatus, Red drum, chasing a fishing lure on surfing

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Etelis coruscans, Deepwater longtail red snapper, long-tailed form. Adults inhabit rocky bottoms of the continental shelf and continental slope from 40 to 400 m deep. Highly valued for the quality of its flesh. It's a slow-growing and late to mature, taking an estimated 5 to 6 years to reach maturity. There are two morphs present in this species: long-tailed and short-tailed forms. The caudal-fin length may be sexually dimorphic. From Madagascar - Composite imageEtelis coruscans, Deepwater longtail red snapper, long-tailed form. Adults inhabit rocky bottoms of the continental shelf and continental slope from 40 to 400 m deep. Highly valued for the quality of its flesh. It's a slow-growing and late to mature, taking an estimated 5 to 6 years to reach maturity. There are two morphs present in this species: long-tailed and short-tailed forms. The caudal-fin length may be sexually dimorphic. From Madagascar - Composite imageEtelis coruscans, Deepwater longtail red snapper, long-tailed form. Adults inhabit rocky bottoms of the continental shelf and continental slope from 40 to 400 m deep. Highly valued for the quality of its flesh. It's a slow-growing and late to mature, taking an estimated 5 to 6 years to reach maturity. There are two morphs present in this species: long-tailed and short-tailed forms. The caudal-fin length may be sexually dimorphic. From Madagascar - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405121

Etelis coruscans, Deepwater longtail red snapper, long-tailed

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Centroberyx affinis, Redfish, inside underwater cave. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite imageCentroberyx affinis, Redfish, inside underwater cave. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite imageCentroberyx affinis, Redfish, inside underwater cave. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405120

Centroberyx affinis, Redfish, inside underwater cave. Occur on

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Centroberyx affinis, Redfish, swimming. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite imageCentroberyx affinis, Redfish, swimming. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite imageCentroberyx affinis, Redfish, swimming. Occur on rocky reefs and muddy substrates of the continental shelf and upper slope, from 10 to 500m deep, forming dense schools close to the bottom at dawn and dusk and dispersing throughout the water column at night to feed. Are slow growing and long-lived fish, which may reach a maximum age of about 30 years and 1 kg in weight. Reasonably detailed stock assessments conducted as part of the Commonwealth process indicate that the redfish stock is significantly growth overfished. From Australia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405119

Centroberyx affinis, Redfish, swimming. Occur on rocky reefs and

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Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405118

Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that

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Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite imageNeocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. Note territorial behaviour, such as raised dorsal spine and lateral display, occurred when submersible vehicles approached fish, suggesting that territorial defence is a common behavioural attribute. From Azores, Portugal - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405117

Neocyttus helgae, False boarfish, swimming. Deep sea fish that

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False boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, PortugalFalse boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, PortugalFalse boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible vehicle. Deep sea fish that lives between 900 and 1800 m deep close to seamounts. Were associated with basalt habitats featuring corals and as well as depressions in sheets of basalt. These features provided refuge from flow and predators as well as immediate access to zooplankton and pelagic prey delivered by rapid currents. From Azores, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405116

False boarfish (Neocyttus helgae) swimming close to submersible

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Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageCrocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageCrocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the surface. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405039

Crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai. Eating bait at the

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Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close to ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403441

Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Young animal, close

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Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite imageNorthern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on ship wreck. It's a prized food fish, caught commercially, as well as recreationally. Lives in waters from 10 to 60 m deep, sometimes almost 100 m. They stay r close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, including offshore oil rigs and shipwrecks. Juvenile fish have a dark spot on their sides below the dorsal fin soft rays. Caribbean sea. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403440

Northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus. Adult, old animal, on

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Spotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus, swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite imageSpotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus, swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite imageSpotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus, swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403439

Spotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus, swimming over sand

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Spotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite imageSpotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite imageSpotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus swimming over sand bottom. It's a carpet shark probably endemic to Australia. Commonly found on coral and rocky reefs, in coastal bays, in estuaries, in seagrass beds, under piers, and on sandy bottoms. Nocturnal feeds on crabs, lobsters, octopuses and fish. Regarded as a pest by lobster fishers. Flesh highly regarded and used on human consumption. There are several reports of unprovoked attacks on divers. This shark is often reluctant to let go once it bites, causing severe lacerations. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403438

Spotted wobbegong, Orectolobus maculatus swimming over sand

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Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, sea form, swimming. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, sea form, swimming. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, sea form, swimming. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403437

Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, sea form,

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Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, river form, catching a prey. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, river form, catching a prey. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, river form, catching a prey. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Barramundi have a mild flavour and a white, flaky flesh, with varying amount of body fat. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403436

Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, river form,

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Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, estuary/sea form, swimming over sea grass. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, estuary/sea form, swimming over sea grass. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Australia. Composite imageBarramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, estuary/sea form, swimming over sea grass. It's an icon of Western Australia’s Kimberley region, prized by recreational fishers for its taste, size and fighting spirit when hooked. They eat almost anything, including other barramundi, and can consume prey up to 60 per cent their own length. They can grow up to 200 cm in length and 60 kg. During their lifecycle, they change sex from male to female. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, with most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore females. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403435

Barramundi or Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer, estuary/sea form,

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Old wife, Enoplosus armatus. In confrontation; note fist dorsal spies raised. It's a species endemic to the temperate coastal waters of Australia. The name "old wife" refers to the sound it makes when caught, caused by it grinding its teeth. Australia. Composite imageOld wife, Enoplosus armatus. In confrontation; note fist dorsal spies raised. It's a species endemic to the temperate coastal waters of Australia. The name "old wife" refers to the sound it makes when caught, caused by it grinding its teeth. Australia. Composite imageOld wife, Enoplosus armatus. In confrontation; note fist dorsal spies raised. It's a species endemic to the temperate coastal waters of Australia. The name "old wife" refers to the sound it makes when caught, caused by it grinding its teeth. Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403434

Old wife, Enoplosus armatus. In confrontation; note fist dorsal

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Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the surface of a brook half emersed. Split view at surface. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia. Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the surface of a brook half emersed. Split view at surface. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia. Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the surface of a brook half emersed. Split view at surface. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403433

Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Omithorhynchus anatinus, at the

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Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. AustraliaWeedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. AustraliaWeedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403432

Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus.

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Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia - Composite imageWeedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia - Composite imageWeedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. Male carrying the eggs. Like seahorses, seadragon males are the sex that cares for the developing eggs. Females lay around 120 eggs onto the brood patch located on the underside of the males' tail. The eggs are fertilised and carried by the male for around a month before the hatchlings emerge. Australia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403431

Weedy seadragon or common seadragon, Phyllopteryx taeniolatus.

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Leafy seadragon or Glauert's seadragon, Phycodurus eques, swimming over algae covered rock. The lobes of skin that grow on the leafy seadragon provide camouflage, giving it the appearance of seaweed. It is able to maintain the illusion when swimming, appearing to move through the water like a piece of floating seaweed. It can also change colour to blend in, but this ability depends on the seadragon's diet, age, location, and stress level. South Australia. Composite imageLeafy seadragon or Glauert's seadragon, Phycodurus eques, swimming over algae covered rock. The lobes of skin that grow on the leafy seadragon provide camouflage, giving it the appearance of seaweed. It is able to maintain the illusion when swimming, appearing to move through the water like a piece of floating seaweed. It can also change colour to blend in, but this ability depends on the seadragon's diet, age, location, and stress level. South Australia. Composite imageLeafy seadragon or Glauert's seadragon, Phycodurus eques, swimming over algae covered rock. The lobes of skin that grow on the leafy seadragon provide camouflage, giving it the appearance of seaweed. It is able to maintain the illusion when swimming, appearing to move through the water like a piece of floating seaweed. It can also change colour to blend in, but this ability depends on the seadragon's diet, age, location, and stress level. South Australia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403430

Leafy seadragon or Glauert's seadragon, Phycodurus eques,

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