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Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, NorwayPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, NorwayPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, Norway© Ondrej Prosicky / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2487065

2487065

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs

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Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, NorwayPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, NorwayPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs fighting on snowy drift ice, Svalbard, Norway© Ondrej Prosicky / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2487065

2487065

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) two adult standing on hind legs

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Ice floe on the shore, Vestvagoya, Lofoten, NorwayIce floe on the shore, Vestvagoya, Lofoten, NorwayIce floe on the shore, Vestvagoya, Lofoten, Norway© Christophe Ravier / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2486288

2486288

Ice floe on the shore, Vestvagoya, Lofoten, Norway

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Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. 
Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484523

2484523

Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own

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Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484516

2484516

Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon

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Artist's concept of Pluto. In 1985 it was discovered that Pluto has an atmosphere, albeit a very tenuous one. Pluto's atmosphere arises only when it approaches closer to the Sun during its highly eccentric, 248 earth years long orbit. The atmosphere likely consists of nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide, which sublimate directly from Pluto's frozen surface. As Pluto's orbit moves it away from the Sun, these gases are believed to slowly precipitate back to Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of Pluto. In 1985 it was discovered that Pluto has an atmosphere, albeit a very tenuous one. Pluto's atmosphere arises only when it approaches closer to the Sun during its highly eccentric, 248 earth years long orbit. The atmosphere likely consists of nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide, which sublimate directly from Pluto's frozen surface. As Pluto's orbit moves it away from the Sun, these gases are believed to slowly precipitate back to Pluto's surface.Artist's concept of Pluto. In 1985 it was discovered that Pluto has an atmosphere, albeit a very tenuous one. Pluto's atmosphere arises only when it approaches closer to the Sun during its highly eccentric, 248 earth years long orbit. The atmosphere likely consists of nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide, which sublimate directly from Pluto's frozen surface. As Pluto's orbit moves it away from the Sun, these gases are believed to slowly precipitate back to Pluto's surface.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484511

2484511

Artist's concept of Pluto. In 1985 it was discovered that Pluto

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A full Neptune washes Triton's frozen surface with an indigo light, the only source of illumination on this now Triton's dark side. Fortuitous alignment of the Sun, Triton and Neptune causes this satellite's shadow to fall on Neptune's distant cloud tops 220 thousand miles away. This view is from within a deep, crater-like depression on Triton's northern hemisphere. . There are many such crater-like depressions on Triton's northern hemisphere. While these depressions look like impact craters, their similar size and spacing suggest that they were created by some other process. Their origin is still unknown, but may involve local melting and collapse of the icy surface. The scarcity of impact craters suggest that this surface is relatively young by solar system standards, probably less than a few billion years old. The depression in this image is about 15 miles in diameter; the ridge on the horizon is approximately seven miles from the mesa in the foreground.A full Neptune washes Triton's frozen surface with an indigo light, the only source of illumination on this now Triton's dark side. Fortuitous alignment of the Sun, Triton and Neptune causes this satellite's shadow to fall on Neptune's distant cloud tops 220 thousand miles away. This view is from within a deep, crater-like depression on Triton's northern hemisphere. . There are many such crater-like depressions on Triton's northern hemisphere. While these depressions look like impact craters, their similar size and spacing suggest that they were created by some other process. Their origin is still unknown, but may involve local melting and collapse of the icy surface. The scarcity of impact craters suggest that this surface is relatively young by solar system standards, probably less than a few billion years old. The depression in this image is about 15 miles in diameter; the ridge on the horizon is approximately seven miles from the mesa in the foreground.A full Neptune washes Triton's frozen surface with an indigo light, the only source of illumination on this now Triton's dark side. Fortuitous alignment of the Sun, Triton and Neptune causes this satellite's shadow to fall on Neptune's distant cloud tops 220 thousand miles away. This view is from within a deep, crater-like depression on Triton's northern hemisphere. . There are many such crater-like depressions on Triton's northern hemisphere. While these depressions look like impact craters, their similar size and spacing suggest that they were created by some other process. Their origin is still unknown, but may involve local melting and collapse of the icy surface. The scarcity of impact craters suggest that this surface is relatively young by solar system standards, probably less than a few billion years old. The depression in this image is about 15 miles in diameter; the ridge on the horizon is approximately seven miles from the mesa in the foreground.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484510

2484510

A full Neptune washes Triton's frozen surface with an indigo

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Illustration of the gas giant Neptune as seen from the surface of its moon Triton. White cirrus clouds race across a crescent Neptune as it presides over Triton's bleak and frozen south polar region. Sheets of frozen nitrogen ice with traces of other substances, including frozen methane and carbon monoxide, overlie Triton's darker material. The ice has turned pink due to the interaction with ultraviolet light from the distant Sun. Further south all of the surface of Triton is covered by such ices.Illustration of the gas giant Neptune as seen from the surface of its moon Triton. White cirrus clouds race across a crescent Neptune as it presides over Triton's bleak and frozen south polar region. Sheets of frozen nitrogen ice with traces of other substances, including frozen methane and carbon monoxide, overlie Triton's darker material. The ice has turned pink due to the interaction with ultraviolet light from the distant Sun. Further south all of the surface of Triton is covered by such ices.Illustration of the gas giant Neptune as seen from the surface of its moon Triton. White cirrus clouds race across a crescent Neptune as it presides over Triton's bleak and frozen south polar region. Sheets of frozen nitrogen ice with traces of other substances, including frozen methane and carbon monoxide, overlie Triton's darker material. The ice has turned pink due to the interaction with ultraviolet light from the distant Sun. Further south all of the surface of Triton is covered by such ices.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484507

2484507

Illustration of the gas giant Neptune as seen from the surface of

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Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484480

2484480

Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water

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Artist's concept of a view across the surface of Themisto towards Jupiter and its moons. This is how Jupiter and its Galilean satellites may appear from the surface of Jupiter's tiny moon Themisto. In this image the artist is suggesting that Themisto has an ancient, dusty and heavily cratered surface with the occasional, and fanciful, outcropping of dirty water ice. . . At a distance of 4.7 million miles, Jupiter subtends an angle of 1.1 degrees (the moon subtends an angle of 0.5 degrees in Earth's sky). The Galilean satellites are, left to right, Ganymede, Europa, Io, and on the far right Callisto. Not much is known about Themisto. It was first discovered in 1975, then lost, then rediscovered in 2000. Themisto is the next significant body orbiting Jupiter beyond Callisto. Beyond Themisto are another 54 known jovian satellites, the furthest of which has an orbital radius of 19 million miles. . With a mean diameter of only 5 miles and an albedo (surface brightness) about half that of the Moon, no earthbound telescope or interplanetary probe has yet revealed any details of Themisto's surface. This satellite is far too small to host an atmosphere, and too small even for its own gravity to pull it into a spherical shape like its relatively massive Galilean cousins. A visiting astronaut could easily propel him/herself into orbit with a single jump.Artist's concept of a view across the surface of Themisto towards Jupiter and its moons. This is how Jupiter and its Galilean satellites may appear from the surface of Jupiter's tiny moon Themisto. In this image the artist is suggesting that Themisto has an ancient, dusty and heavily cratered surface with the occasional, and fanciful, outcropping of dirty water ice. . . At a distance of 4.7 million miles, Jupiter subtends an angle of 1.1 degrees (the moon subtends an angle of 0.5 degrees in Earth's sky). The Galilean satellites are, left to right, Ganymede, Europa, Io, and on the far right Callisto. Not much is known about Themisto. It was first discovered in 1975, then lost, then rediscovered in 2000. Themisto is the next significant body orbiting Jupiter beyond Callisto. Beyond Themisto are another 54 known jovian satellites, the furthest of which has an orbital radius of 19 million miles. . With a mean diameter of only 5 miles and an albedo (surface brightness) about half that of the Moon, no earthbound telescope or interplanetary probe has yet revealed any details of Themisto's surface. This satellite is far too small to host an atmosphere, and too small even for its own gravity to pull it into a spherical shape like its relatively massive Galilean cousins. A visiting astronaut could easily propel him/herself into orbit with a single jump.Artist's concept of a view across the surface of Themisto towards Jupiter and its moons. This is how Jupiter and its Galilean satellites may appear from the surface of Jupiter's tiny moon Themisto. In this image the artist is suggesting that Themisto has an ancient, dusty and heavily cratered surface with the occasional, and fanciful, outcropping of dirty water ice. . . At a distance of 4.7 million miles, Jupiter subtends an angle of 1.1 degrees (the moon subtends an angle of 0.5 degrees in Earth's sky). The Galilean satellites are, left to right, Ganymede, Europa, Io, and on the far right Callisto. Not much is known about Themisto. It was first discovered in 1975, then lost, then rediscovered in 2000. Themisto is the next significant body orbiting Jupiter beyond Callisto. Beyond Themisto are another 54 known jovian satellites, the furthest of which has an orbital radius of 19 million miles. . With a mean diameter of only 5 miles and an albedo (surface brightness) about half that of the Moon, no earthbound telescope or interplanetary probe has yet revealed any details of Themisto's surface. This satellite is far too small to host an atmosphere, and too small even for its own gravity to pull it into a spherical shape like its relatively massive Galilean cousins. A visiting astronaut could easily propel him/herself into orbit with a single jump.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484473

2484473

Artist's concept of a view across the surface of Themisto towards

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Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same size and density as Earth's Moon. Io is 260,000 miles away from Jupiter, which about the same distance as the Moon is from the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484472

2484472

Io is Jupiter's innermost large satellite and is about the same

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An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484471

2484471

An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of

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An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484471

2484471

An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of

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An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by Agents
2484471

2484471

An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of

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An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of regions that look very much like pack-ice on Earth's polar seas during spring thaws. The perspective is from an altitude of several thousand feet. The large crater in the foreground is about a half-mile in diameter. . Europa is Jupiter's fourth largest satellite and is slightly smaller than the Earth's Moon. Europa is believed to be composed of silicate rocks with a layer of water ice covering the entire surface. . It may be that beneath Europa's surface ice there is a layer of liquid water, perhaps as much as 30 miles deep. This subsurface ocean would be kept liquid by tidally generated heat. If Europa does indeed harbor a liquid water ocean, it would be the only place in the Solar System besides Earth where liquid water exists in significant quantities. It may also be the only place in the Solar System where life has evolved outside the Earth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484471

2484471

An artist's concept inspired by recent discoveries on Europa of

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Artist's concept showing how Saturn might appear from within a hypothetical ice cave on the surface of Iapetus. As of yet there is no evidence that such caves exist. Iapetus is the third largest moon of Saturn and is primarily composed of water ice.Artist's concept showing how Saturn might appear from within a hypothetical ice cave on the surface of Iapetus. As of yet there is no evidence that such caves exist. Iapetus is the third largest moon of Saturn and is primarily composed of water ice.Artist's concept showing how Saturn might appear from within a hypothetical ice cave on the surface of Iapetus. As of yet there is no evidence that such caves exist. Iapetus is the third largest moon of Saturn and is primarily composed of water ice.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484468

2484468

Artist's concept showing how Saturn might appear from within a

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Artist's concept of an impact crater on Ganymede, about 10 miles in diameter, dominates a scene otherwise defined by a dozen long ridges. In the middle of the crater is a central peak, formed when the energy of the impact liquefied the crust long enough for it to rebound upward and solidify once again. . . Immediately above the horizon, Jupiter is still a majestic spectacle, even at a distance of nearly three times that between the Earth and its moon. Much closer on the upper right is Ganymede's sister satellite Europa. At a distance of 307 thousand miles from this vantage point, Europa is only a quarter again as far as the Earth is from its moon. To the lower left of Jupiter at nearly a million miles is Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. . . Jupiter's largest satellite Ganymede has a varying surface, some of which is characterized by rumpled bundles of ridges and grooves that run for hundreds of miles over a frozen surface of water-ice. They probably formed long ago when tectonic forces pulled apart Ganymede's upper crust; similar sets of faults occur in rift zones on Earth, as in eastern Africa. Subsequent meteoritic impacts have peppered, and broken in places, the continuity of the running formations. 
Artist's concept of an impact crater on Ganymede, about 10 miles in diameter, dominates a scene otherwise defined by a dozen long ridges. In the middle of the crater is a central peak, formed when the energy of the impact liquefied the crust long enough for it to rebound upward and solidify once again. . . Immediately above the horizon, Jupiter is still a majestic spectacle, even at a distance of nearly three times that between the Earth and its moon. Much closer on the upper right is Ganymede's sister satellite Europa. At a distance of 307 thousand miles from this vantage point, Europa is only a quarter again as far as the Earth is from its moon. To the lower left of Jupiter at nearly a million miles is Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. . . Jupiter's largest satellite Ganymede has a varying surface, some of which is characterized by rumpled bundles of ridges and grooves that run for hundreds of miles over a frozen surface of water-ice. They probably formed long ago when tectonic forces pulled apart Ganymede's upper crust; similar sets of faults occur in rift zones on Earth, as in eastern Africa. Subsequent meteoritic impacts have peppered, and broken in places, the continuity of the running formations. Artist's concept of an impact crater on Ganymede, about 10 miles in diameter, dominates a scene otherwise defined by a dozen long ridges. In the middle of the crater is a central peak, formed when the energy of the impact liquefied the crust long enough for it to rebound upward and solidify once again. . . Immediately above the horizon, Jupiter is still a majestic spectacle, even at a distance of nearly three times that between the Earth and its moon. Much closer on the upper right is Ganymede's sister satellite Europa. At a distance of 307 thousand miles from this vantage point, Europa is only a quarter again as far as the Earth is from its moon. To the lower left of Jupiter at nearly a million miles is Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. . . Jupiter's largest satellite Ganymede has a varying surface, some of which is characterized by rumpled bundles of ridges and grooves that run for hundreds of miles over a frozen surface of water-ice. They probably formed long ago when tectonic forces pulled apart Ganymede's upper crust; similar sets of faults occur in rift zones on Earth, as in eastern Africa. Subsequent meteoritic impacts have peppered, and broken in places, the continuity of the running formations. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484463

2484463

Artist's concept of an impact crater on Ganymede, about 10 miles

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A crescent Jupiter hovers near the horizon along with Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. In the foreground a meandering crevasse cleaves Europa's icy surface, one of thousands that crisscross this moon's exceedingly flat and bright exterior. The surface of Europa is about five times brighter than our own Moon and is so flat that no feature rises more than 3,000 feet.A crescent Jupiter hovers near the horizon along with Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. In the foreground a meandering crevasse cleaves Europa's icy surface, one of thousands that crisscross this moon's exceedingly flat and bright exterior. The surface of Europa is about five times brighter than our own Moon and is so flat that no feature rises more than 3,000 feet.A crescent Jupiter hovers near the horizon along with Jupiter's volcanic satellite Io. In the foreground a meandering crevasse cleaves Europa's icy surface, one of thousands that crisscross this moon's exceedingly flat and bright exterior. The surface of Europa is about five times brighter than our own Moon and is so flat that no feature rises more than 3,000 feet.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484460

2484460

A crescent Jupiter hovers near the horizon along with Jupiter's

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Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484446

2484446

Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484407

2484407

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the North Pole.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484403

2484403

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North America.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484402

2484402

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on North Asia.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484398

2484398

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the South Pole, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484395

2484395

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background, centered on the Arctic and North Pole, without clouds.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484391

2484391

3D illustration of planet Earth globe on white background,

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The smooth ice field of Europa might contain a subsurface ocean filled with alien life.
The smooth ice field of Europa might contain a subsurface ocean filled with alien life. The smooth ice field of Europa might contain a subsurface ocean filled with alien life. © Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484224

2484224

The smooth ice field of Europa might contain a subsurface ocean

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A hypothetical planet orbiting a red dwarf star. The planet is frozen because red dwarfs are small, cool stars.A hypothetical planet orbiting a red dwarf star. The planet is frozen because red dwarfs are small, cool stars.A hypothetical planet orbiting a red dwarf star. The planet is frozen because red dwarfs are small, cool stars.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483978

2483978

A hypothetical planet orbiting a red dwarf star. The planet is

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Pluto may have springs of liquid oxygen on its frozen surface.Pluto may have springs of liquid oxygen on its frozen surface.Pluto may have springs of liquid oxygen on its frozen surface.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483964

2483964

Pluto may have springs of liquid oxygen on its frozen surface.

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Saturn's moon, Tethys, is split by an enormous valley called Ithaca Chasma.Saturn's moon, Tethys, is split by an enormous valley called Ithaca Chasma.Saturn's moon, Tethys, is split by an enormous valley called Ithaca Chasma.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483943

2483943

Saturn's moon, Tethys, is split by an enormous valley called

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Even though Mercury is the planet nearest the sun, it may have large amounts of ice at its poles, permanently shaded from the sun.Even though Mercury is the planet nearest the sun, it may have large amounts of ice at its poles, permanently shaded from the sun.Even though Mercury is the planet nearest the sun, it may have large amounts of ice at its poles, permanently shaded from the sun.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483938

2483938

Even though Mercury is the planet nearest the sun, it may have

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Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water. This crust will often pile up in long ridges as floes crash into one another.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water. This crust will often pile up in long ridges as floes crash into one another.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water. This crust will often pile up in long ridges as floes crash into one another.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483929

2483929

Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice

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Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483928

2483928

Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice

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The ice spires of Jupiter's moon Callisto were created when softer ice evaporated, leaving behind the harder cores.The ice spires of Jupiter's moon Callisto were created when softer ice evaporated, leaving behind the harder cores.The ice spires of Jupiter's moon Callisto were created when softer ice evaporated, leaving behind the harder cores.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483911

2483911

The ice spires of Jupiter's moon Callisto were created when

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Jupiter's large moon, Callisto, is an icy world. Many steep cliffs, called scarps, criss-cross its surface.Jupiter's large moon, Callisto, is an icy world. Many steep cliffs, called scarps, criss-cross its surface.Jupiter's large moon, Callisto, is an icy world. Many steep cliffs, called scarps, criss-cross its surface.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483910

2483910

Jupiter's large moon, Callisto, is an icy world. Many steep

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Uranus seen from the surface of its moon, Ariel. Uranus' moon Ariel boasts an enormous trench-like chasm where two blocks of its icy crust have separated.Uranus seen from the surface of its moon, Ariel. Uranus' moon Ariel boasts an enormous trench-like chasm where two blocks of its icy crust have separated.Uranus seen from the surface of its moon, Ariel. Uranus' moon Ariel boasts an enormous trench-like chasm where two blocks of its icy crust have separated.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483883

2483883

Uranus seen from the surface of its moon, Ariel. Uranus' moon

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Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice above a vast ocean of liquid water.© Ron Miller / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483868

2483868

Jupiter's large moon, Europa, is covered by a thick crust of ice

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View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483161

2483161

View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.

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View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483161

2483161

View looking out from inside a glacier in Jasper, Canada.

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Glacier cave in Alaska.Glacier cave in Alaska.Glacier cave in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483157

2483157

Glacier cave in Alaska.

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Glacier cave in Alaska.Glacier cave in Alaska.Glacier cave in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483157

2483157

Glacier cave in Alaska.

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Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483146

2483146

Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.

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Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483146

2483146

Self-portrait under a glacier in Alaska.

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View under a glacier in Alaska.View under a glacier in Alaska.View under a glacier in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483145

2483145

View under a glacier in Alaska.

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View under a glacier in Alaska.View under a glacier in Alaska.View under a glacier in Alaska.© Jonathan Tucker / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2483145

2483145

View under a glacier in Alaska.

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A photographer makes a self-portrait among the seracs of a nameless glacier known locally as Number 40, deep in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Due to the thin air at this altitude (nearly 17,400 ft or 5,300 m above sea level), even the overexposed moonlight can't wash out the bright central bulge of our Milky Way. Mars is the reddish object just to the left of the moon.A photographer makes a self-portrait among the seracs of a nameless glacier known locally as Number 40, deep in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Due to the thin air at this altitude (nearly 17,400 ft or 5,300 m above sea level), even the overexposed moonlight can't wash out the bright central bulge of our Milky Way. Mars is the reddish object just to the left of the moon.A photographer makes a self-portrait among the seracs of a nameless glacier known locally as Number 40, deep in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Due to the thin air at this altitude (nearly 17,400 ft or 5,300 m above sea level), even the overexposed moonlight can't wash out the bright central bulge of our Milky Way. Mars is the reddish object just to the left of the moon.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482999

2482999

A photographer makes a self-portrait among the seracs of a

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Star trails in the No.40 glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.Star trails in the No.40 glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.Star trails in the No.40 glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482992

2482992

Star trails in the No.40 glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on

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Anticrepuscular rays above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Anticrepuscular rays, or antisolar rays, are meteorological optical phenomena similar to crepuscular rays.Anticrepuscular rays above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Anticrepuscular rays, or antisolar rays, are meteorological optical phenomena similar to crepuscular rays.Anticrepuscular rays above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan. Anticrepuscular rays, or antisolar rays, are meteorological optical phenomena similar to crepuscular rays.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482990

2482990

Anticrepuscular rays above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet,

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An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482921

2482921

An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light

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Zodiacal light appear brightly in the morning twilight above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.Zodiacal light appear brightly in the morning twilight above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.Zodiacal light appear brightly in the morning twilight above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482909

2482909

Zodiacal light appear brightly in the morning twilight above a

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An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light above a glacier in the Himalayas of Tibet, on the border of China and Bhutan.© Jeff Dai / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2482908

2482908

An all sky panorama view of winter Milky Way and zodiacal light

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