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Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. MalaysiaRock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. MalaysiaRock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. Malaysia© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2172936

Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others

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Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. MalaysiaRock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. MalaysiaRock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey. Malaysia© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2172935

Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others

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Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey.Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey.Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others forming oval shape ring around a drop honey.© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2172934

Rock ants feasting on green leaf, piling on top of each others

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The pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126359

The pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres

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The Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105418

The Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103560

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103468

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers to mark the bees and identify them with a scanner at the entrance to the hive or near the nurse bees. In that way, it is possible to monitor the bees' activities on an individual level. The times they go out, etc… Research Center HOBOS, Würzburg, Germany.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103464

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Microchips are used by researchers

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423326

Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423324

Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423323

Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423322

Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423321

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423320

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423319

Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frame© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423318

Honey bees on a hive frame

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New CaledoniaHoney bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New CaledoniaHoney bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New Caledonia© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2396935

Honey bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New

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Wild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, BrazilWild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, BrazilWild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, Brazil© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2304056

Wild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, Brazil

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Merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaMerchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaMerchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150953

Merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150952

Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150951

Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Saudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaSaudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaSaudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150950

Saudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)© Frédéric Didillon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2141332

Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer'

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The pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126387

The pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women

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The pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126386

The pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey,

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The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126385

The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made

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The pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126384

The pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a

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The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126383

The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126382

The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional

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The pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126380

The pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126379

The pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is

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The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126378

The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to

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The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126377

The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo”

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126376

The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to

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The pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126375

The pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126374

The pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey.

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The pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126372

The pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the

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The pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126371

The pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for

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The pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126370

The pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126369

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126367

The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled

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The pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126366

The pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126365

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126364

The pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy

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The pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126363

The pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted

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The pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126362

The pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has

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The pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126361

The pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and

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The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126360

The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126358

The pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126357

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126356

The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126354

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126353

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126352

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126351

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126350

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126349

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker.

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126347

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work,

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126346

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126345

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126344

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126343

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126342

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126341

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126340

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126339

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126337

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126336

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126335

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126334

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126333

Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126331

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126330

Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the

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The Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126329

The Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day

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The Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126328

The Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman

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The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126327

The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey

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The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126326

The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased

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The Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126322

The Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126318

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126317

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126316

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak

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The Honey Nights. Boni, advancing along a branch, holds in his hand a smoker made of ficus roots. The bees in flight, lit up by our flashlights, sparkle like little stars. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, advancing along a branch, holds in his hand a smoker made of ficus roots. The bees in flight, lit up by our flashlights, sparkle like little stars. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, advancing along a branch, holds in his hand a smoker made of ficus roots. The bees in flight, lit up by our flashlights, sparkle like little stars. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126310

The Honey Nights. Boni, advancing along a branch, holds in his

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The Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126309

The Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who

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The Honey Nights. Pak Hamsah on a branch next to a nest of Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata), the giant bee of Asia whose geographic area stretches west to east from Pakistan to Bornéo and north to south from the Himalayas to Sri Lanka. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Pak Hamsah on a branch next to a nest of Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata), the giant bee of Asia whose geographic area stretches west to east from Pakistan to Bornéo and north to south from the Himalayas to Sri Lanka. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Pak Hamsah on a branch next to a nest of Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata), the giant bee of Asia whose geographic area stretches west to east from Pakistan to Bornéo and north to south from the Himalayas to Sri Lanka. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126304

The Honey Nights. Pak Hamsah on a branch next to a nest of Giant

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The Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126303

The Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from

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The Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from the giant bees' only comb. The precious nectar falls into a basket hanging below the branch. The basket is then lowered by ropes. Depending on the abundance of flowers and the time of the harvest, twenty or so combs can yield a harvest of 100, even 140 kg of honey per lalau. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126302

The Honey Nights. Hamsah and his brother Boni cut the honey from

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The Honey Nights. The moonless nights of December to March: Hamsah and his brother Boni are agile climbers. Taught when they were young by their father, they are known in the community for their dexterity and courage. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The moonless nights of December to March: Hamsah and his brother Boni are agile climbers. Taught when they were young by their father, they are known in the community for their dexterity and courage. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The moonless nights of December to March: Hamsah and his brother Boni are agile climbers. Taught when they were young by their father, they are known in the community for their dexterity and courage. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126300

The Honey Nights. The moonless nights of December to March:

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The Honey Nights. In the foliage, Hamsah and his brother Boni harvest, with the help of smokers, ropes and baskets, about twenty nests of the giant bee. This ancient technique barely differs from the harvests by the primitive people living on this island 12,000 years ago, as can be attested by the cave paintings of bee combs in the caves of Liang Karim situated in the east of the island in the Marang mountains. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the foliage, Hamsah and his brother Boni harvest, with the help of smokers, ropes and baskets, about twenty nests of the giant bee. This ancient technique barely differs from the harvests by the primitive people living on this island 12,000 years ago, as can be attested by the cave paintings of bee combs in the caves of Liang Karim situated in the east of the island in the Marang mountains. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the foliage, Hamsah and his brother Boni harvest, with the help of smokers, ropes and baskets, about twenty nests of the giant bee. This ancient technique barely differs from the harvests by the primitive people living on this island 12,000 years ago, as can be attested by the cave paintings of bee combs in the caves of Liang Karim situated in the east of the island in the Marang mountains. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126298

The Honey Nights. In the foliage, Hamsah and his brother Boni

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Combs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, FranceCombs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, FranceCombs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2118489

Combs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, France

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Following the harvest, the honey is shared, The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaFollowing the harvest, the honey is shared, The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaFollowing the harvest, the honey is shared, The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105423

Following the harvest, the honey is shared, The Honey Tribe, Omo

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In the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105422

In the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the

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Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105421

Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia

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In an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105420

In an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a

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On market days in the Bana village of Kako, the mead bars do great businesses with the Bana men who come to drink liters of teji, which, though not very alcoholic, inebriate quickly. The Honey tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaOn market days in the Bana village of Kako, the mead bars do great businesses with the Bana men who come to drink liters of teji, which, though not very alcoholic, inebriate quickly. The Honey tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaOn market days in the Bana village of Kako, the mead bars do great businesses with the Bana men who come to drink liters of teji, which, though not very alcoholic, inebriate quickly. The Honey tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105419

On market days in the Bana village of Kako, the mead bars do

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A harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105416

A harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of

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The honey harvested by the Banas is a mix of wax and honey that is sold to make teji, the local mead that is part of all the holidays and festivals. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe honey harvested by the Banas is a mix of wax and honey that is sold to make teji, the local mead that is part of all the holidays and festivals. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe honey harvested by the Banas is a mix of wax and honey that is sold to make teji, the local mead that is part of all the holidays and festivals. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105415

The honey harvested by the Banas is a mix of wax and honey that

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Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105413

Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe,

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In the village of Bori, in the land of the Banas, during the initiation of the young Aïke, three welcome beers are given to the many guests over the three days. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the village of Bori, in the land of the Banas, during the initiation of the young Aïke, three welcome beers are given to the many guests over the three days. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the village of Bori, in the land of the Banas, during the initiation of the young Aïke, three welcome beers are given to the many guests over the three days. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105409

In the village of Bori, in the land of the Banas, during the

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In the land of the Bana tribe, honey is harvested twice a year, at the end of the rain seasons. They sell their mix of honey and wax at the market. Often, the Banas only harvest one or two calabashes worth to earn a bit of money. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, honey is harvested twice a year, at the end of the rain seasons. They sell their mix of honey and wax at the market. Often, the Banas only harvest one or two calabashes worth to earn a bit of money. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, honey is harvested twice a year, at the end of the rain seasons. They sell their mix of honey and wax at the market. Often, the Banas only harvest one or two calabashes worth to earn a bit of money. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105405

In the land of the Bana tribe, honey is harvested twice a year,

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In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105401

In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey

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