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Deer (Capreolus capreolus) group at sunrise, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceDeer (Capreolus capreolus) group at sunrise, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceDeer (Capreolus capreolus) group at sunrise, Yonne, Burgundy, France© David Henrot / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide
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Deer (Capreolus capreolus) group at sunrise, Yonne, Burgundy,

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Misty morning in the Cure Valley, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceMisty morning in the Cure Valley, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceMisty morning in the Cure Valley, Yonne, Burgundy, France© David Henrot / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide
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Misty morning in the Cure Valley, Yonne, Burgundy, France

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Dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.Dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.Dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.© Thomas Dressler / BiosphotoJPG - RMExclusive sale possible
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Dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at

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Disused wagons at the dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.Disused wagons at the dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.Disused wagons at the dramatically scarred landscape of mineral-rich ground and rock at the Rio Tinto mines. Huelva province, Andalusia, Spain.© Thomas Dressler / BiosphotoJPG - RMExclusive sale possible
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2486499

Disused wagons at the dramatically scarred landscape of

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Morning mist in the uplands of the Huelva province. Aerial view. Drone shot. Andalusia, Spain.Morning mist in the uplands of the Huelva province. Aerial view. Drone shot. Andalusia, Spain.Morning mist in the uplands of the Huelva province. Aerial view. Drone shot. Andalusia, Spain.© Thomas Dressler / BiosphotoJPG - RMExclusive sale possible
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Morning mist in the uplands of the Huelva province. Aerial view.

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The Giant's Tomb, meander of the Semoise, Ardennes, BelgiumThe Giant's Tomb, meander of the Semoise, Ardennes, BelgiumThe Giant's Tomb, meander of the Semoise, Ardennes, Belgium© Christian Cabron / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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The Giant's Tomb, meander of the Semoise, Ardennes, Belgium

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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.© Roger de La Harpe / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in

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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.© Roger de La Harpe / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in

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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.© Roger de La Harpe / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Beautiful rolling hills of Canola flowers and farmlands in

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Beautiful rolling hills of canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Sheep graze in the fields with the Klipheuwel Wind Farm in the background. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Sheep graze in the fields with the Klipheuwel Wind Farm in the background. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.Beautiful rolling hills of canola flowers and farmlands in spring. Sheep graze in the fields with the Klipheuwel Wind Farm in the background. Near Caledon, Overberg, Western Cape, South Africa.© Roger de La Harpe / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Beautiful rolling hills of canola flowers and farmlands in

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Milky Way over the shining town of Veseloe in Russia.Milky Way over the shining town of Veseloe in Russia.Milky Way over the shining town of Veseloe in Russia.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Milky Way over the shining town of Veseloe in Russia.

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The arch of the Milky Way over the Volgograd region, Russia.The arch of the Milky Way over the Volgograd region, Russia.The arch of the Milky Way over the Volgograd region, Russia.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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The arch of the Milky Way over the Volgograd region, Russia.

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Milky Way over the mountains covered with forests and cave city Tepe-Kermen near Bakhchisarai in Crimea.Milky Way over the mountains covered with forests and cave city Tepe-Kermen near Bakhchisarai in Crimea.Milky Way over the mountains covered with forests and cave city Tepe-Kermen near Bakhchisarai in Crimea.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Milky Way over the mountains covered with forests and cave city

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360 panorama of the Milky Way over Lago-Naki plateau, Russia.360 panorama of the Milky Way over Lago-Naki plateau, Russia.360 panorama of the Milky Way over Lago-Naki plateau, Russia.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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360 panorama of the Milky Way over Lago-Naki plateau, Russia.

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A lone man stands on the mountains at night under the moon, Sudak, Crimea.A lone man stands on the mountains at night under the moon, Sudak, Crimea.A lone man stands on the mountains at night under the moon, Sudak, Crimea.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A lone man stands on the mountains at night under the moon,

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A couple gazing at the Milky Way from atop the Lago-Naki plateau overlooking Russia.
A couple gazing at the Milky Way from atop the Lago-Naki plateau overlooking Russia. A couple gazing at the Milky Way from atop the Lago-Naki plateau overlooking Russia. © Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A couple gazing at the Milky Way from atop the Lago-Naki plateau

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Man sits on top of Demerdzhi mountain under the Milky Way at night in Alushta, Crimea.Man sits on top of Demerdzhi mountain under the Milky Way at night in Alushta, Crimea.Man sits on top of Demerdzhi mountain under the Milky Way at night in Alushta, Crimea.© Yuri Zvezdny / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Man sits on top of Demerdzhi mountain under the Milky Way at

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A manned Asteroid Lander descends toward the rugged and cratered surface of an ancient asteroid. Orbiting the asteroid on the upper left is a Deep Space Vehicle (DSV) and Extended Stay Module (ESM).A manned Asteroid Lander descends toward the rugged and cratered surface of an ancient asteroid. Orbiting the asteroid on the upper left is a Deep Space Vehicle (DSV) and Extended Stay Module (ESM).A manned Asteroid Lander descends toward the rugged and cratered surface of an ancient asteroid. Orbiting the asteroid on the upper left is a Deep Space Vehicle (DSV) and Extended Stay Module (ESM).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A manned Asteroid Lander descends toward the rugged and cratered

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Artist's concept of volcanic activity on the surface of Venus. Based upon analysis of the number and distribution of impact craters across the whole of Venus, the entire surface appears to be the same age: about 500 million years old. This is an astonishing result since 500 million years is young for a planet in our solar system. Like the Earth, Venus is thought to be about 4.5 billion years old. This suggests that 500 million years ago Venus completely resurfaced itself, turned itself inside out. What caused such a cataclysmic event, or if indeed this is what really happened, remains a mystery.Artist's concept of volcanic activity on the surface of Venus. Based upon analysis of the number and distribution of impact craters across the whole of Venus, the entire surface appears to be the same age: about 500 million years old. This is an astonishing result since 500 million years is young for a planet in our solar system. Like the Earth, Venus is thought to be about 4.5 billion years old. This suggests that 500 million years ago Venus completely resurfaced itself, turned itself inside out. What caused such a cataclysmic event, or if indeed this is what really happened, remains a mystery.Artist's concept of volcanic activity on the surface of Venus. Based upon analysis of the number and distribution of impact craters across the whole of Venus, the entire surface appears to be the same age: about 500 million years old. This is an astonishing result since 500 million years is young for a planet in our solar system. Like the Earth, Venus is thought to be about 4.5 billion years old. This suggests that 500 million years ago Venus completely resurfaced itself, turned itself inside out. What caused such a cataclysmic event, or if indeed this is what really happened, remains a mystery.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of volcanic activity on the surface of Venus.

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Lightning has been observed in Venus' clouds, however it is not known if lightning strikes the surface as well. If it did, it would be one more infernal element in a nightmare world. Any rain associated with such a storm would likely be in the form of sulfuric acid, and that would evaporate long before it reached the ground, as the surface of Venus is far hotter and dryer than any earthly desert.Lightning has been observed in Venus' clouds, however it is not known if lightning strikes the surface as well. If it did, it would be one more infernal element in a nightmare world. Any rain associated with such a storm would likely be in the form of sulfuric acid, and that would evaporate long before it reached the ground, as the surface of Venus is far hotter and dryer than any earthly desert.Lightning has been observed in Venus' clouds, however it is not known if lightning strikes the surface as well. If it did, it would be one more infernal element in a nightmare world. Any rain associated with such a storm would likely be in the form of sulfuric acid, and that would evaporate long before it reached the ground, as the surface of Venus is far hotter and dryer than any earthly desert.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Lightning has been observed in Venus' clouds, however it is not

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Artist's concept of the surface of Venus. A visit to Venus' surface would reveal a wasteland of vast proportions. While Venus is nearly as large as the Earth, it has over three times the land mass (most of the Earth's surface is under water). The conditions are so dry and hostile to life as we know it, or can imagine it, the surface of Venus is likely as sterile as an autoclave. . . Venus' surface is actually hotter than Mercury's, despite being nearly twice as far from the Sun. It is so hot that the stony venusian ground itself may be slightly plastic and emit a red glow at night. The closest the Earth comes to matching this combination of extreme pressure and temperature is in the realm of deep undersea volcanic vents.Artist's concept of the surface of Venus. A visit to Venus' surface would reveal a wasteland of vast proportions. While Venus is nearly as large as the Earth, it has over three times the land mass (most of the Earth's surface is under water). The conditions are so dry and hostile to life as we know it, or can imagine it, the surface of Venus is likely as sterile as an autoclave. . . Venus' surface is actually hotter than Mercury's, despite being nearly twice as far from the Sun. It is so hot that the stony venusian ground itself may be slightly plastic and emit a red glow at night. The closest the Earth comes to matching this combination of extreme pressure and temperature is in the realm of deep undersea volcanic vents.Artist's concept of the surface of Venus. A visit to Venus' surface would reveal a wasteland of vast proportions. While Venus is nearly as large as the Earth, it has over three times the land mass (most of the Earth's surface is under water). The conditions are so dry and hostile to life as we know it, or can imagine it, the surface of Venus is likely as sterile as an autoclave. . . Venus' surface is actually hotter than Mercury's, despite being nearly twice as far from the Sun. It is so hot that the stony venusian ground itself may be slightly plastic and emit a red glow at night. The closest the Earth comes to matching this combination of extreme pressure and temperature is in the realm of deep undersea volcanic vents.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of the surface of Venus. A visit to Venus'

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Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. 
Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own solar system there are a likely billions of other planets orbiting stars like and unlike our own sun. Our sun, our Earth and moon, our solar system, represent only one of an unimaginable number of possibilities. The universe is a big, big place. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of an alien planetary system. Far beyond our own

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Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon Iapetus. Saturn dominates Iapetus' velvet black sky framed by three inner moons. Left to right are Tethys, Rhea and Dione. . Less than half the size of the Earth's moon, ice-covered Iapetus is one of the few places in the solar system that offers a good view of Saturn's rings. This is because Iapetus' orbit is inclined almost 15 degrees to Saturn's equator. With the exception of Phoebe, none of Saturn's other satellites offer such a vantage point. Unlike haze-shrouded Titan, Iapetus has no atmosphere to speak of and is believed to be composed almost entirely of water ice.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of Saturn as seen from the surface of its moon

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Despite its small size and extreme distance from the Sun, Pluto does have an atmosphere. The atmosphere arises because there are periods when Pluto is closer to the Sun than Neptune. During this plutonian summer, the ices on Pluto's surface sublimate and form a methane and nitrogen atmosphere. This atmosphere is continually produced and lost again while Pluto is inside Neptune's orbit; during this time the density of Pluto's atmosphere may rival that of Mars.
Despite its small size and extreme distance from the Sun, Pluto does have an atmosphere. The atmosphere arises because there are periods when Pluto is closer to the Sun than Neptune. During this plutonian summer, the ices on Pluto's surface sublimate and form a methane and nitrogen atmosphere. This atmosphere is continually produced and lost again while Pluto is inside Neptune's orbit; during this time the density of Pluto's atmosphere may rival that of Mars. Despite its small size and extreme distance from the Sun, Pluto does have an atmosphere. The atmosphere arises because there are periods when Pluto is closer to the Sun than Neptune. During this plutonian summer, the ices on Pluto's surface sublimate and form a methane and nitrogen atmosphere. This atmosphere is continually produced and lost again while Pluto is inside Neptune's orbit; during this time the density of Pluto's atmosphere may rival that of Mars. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Despite its small size and extreme distance from the Sun, Pluto

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Artist's concept of an earth-like planet. There are likely earth-like planets that miss being hospitable to life because they are a little too close to their host sun(s).Artist's concept of an earth-like planet. There are likely earth-like planets that miss being hospitable to life because they are a little too close to their host sun(s).Artist's concept of an earth-like planet. There are likely earth-like planets that miss being hospitable to life because they are a little too close to their host sun(s).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of an earth-like planet. There are likely

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Artist's concept of how a martian sunrise might look from the bottom of a deep canyon. The Sun is surrounded by a bluish halo due to dust in the martian atmosphere. . . During the martian day, this dust absorbs the blue light from the Sun, resulting in an overall salmon colored sky, but it also scatters some of the blue light into the area immediately around the Sun. The blue color only becomes apparent near sunrise and sunset, when the light has to pass through the most amount of dust. The canyon is representative of the land forms found in the Olympica Fossae region, located in northern Tharsis, south of the Alba Patera volcano.Artist's concept of how a martian sunrise might look from the bottom of a deep canyon. The Sun is surrounded by a bluish halo due to dust in the martian atmosphere. . . During the martian day, this dust absorbs the blue light from the Sun, resulting in an overall salmon colored sky, but it also scatters some of the blue light into the area immediately around the Sun. The blue color only becomes apparent near sunrise and sunset, when the light has to pass through the most amount of dust. The canyon is representative of the land forms found in the Olympica Fossae region, located in northern Tharsis, south of the Alba Patera volcano.Artist's concept of how a martian sunrise might look from the bottom of a deep canyon. The Sun is surrounded by a bluish halo due to dust in the martian atmosphere. . . During the martian day, this dust absorbs the blue light from the Sun, resulting in an overall salmon colored sky, but it also scatters some of the blue light into the area immediately around the Sun. The blue color only becomes apparent near sunrise and sunset, when the light has to pass through the most amount of dust. The canyon is representative of the land forms found in the Olympica Fossae region, located in northern Tharsis, south of the Alba Patera volcano.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how a martian sunrise might look from the

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Artist's concept of a view across the surface of the Moon towards Earth in the distance. In this image, the artist tries to capture one of the moon's more bizarre realties: it is believed that the surface is buried under shattered rock, dust, and debris to a depth of 16 miles. This debris layer is the result of over four billion years of meteorites, micrometeorites, and comets striking the moon's surface. . The Moon has no atmosphere to scatter sunlight, as a result the lunar sky appears velvety black, whether it is the middle of the day or midnight Selene time. Another consequence of the lack of an atmosphere is that surface temperatures vary widely, from 212º F during the day to minus 280º F at night.Artist's concept of a view across the surface of the Moon towards Earth in the distance. In this image, the artist tries to capture one of the moon's more bizarre realties: it is believed that the surface is buried under shattered rock, dust, and debris to a depth of 16 miles. This debris layer is the result of over four billion years of meteorites, micrometeorites, and comets striking the moon's surface. . The Moon has no atmosphere to scatter sunlight, as a result the lunar sky appears velvety black, whether it is the middle of the day or midnight Selene time. Another consequence of the lack of an atmosphere is that surface temperatures vary widely, from 212º F during the day to minus 280º F at night.Artist's concept of a view across the surface of the Moon towards Earth in the distance. In this image, the artist tries to capture one of the moon's more bizarre realties: it is believed that the surface is buried under shattered rock, dust, and debris to a depth of 16 miles. This debris layer is the result of over four billion years of meteorites, micrometeorites, and comets striking the moon's surface. . The Moon has no atmosphere to scatter sunlight, as a result the lunar sky appears velvety black, whether it is the middle of the day or midnight Selene time. Another consequence of the lack of an atmosphere is that surface temperatures vary widely, from 212º F during the day to minus 280º F at night.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of a view across the surface of the Moon towards

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Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water from an encounter with an icy comet has collected in the perpetual shade of a deep crater on the surface of the moon, where the temperature is a constant - 380º F. . In 1998, the unmanned Lunar Prospector probe discovered evidence for water ice on the surface of the moon. Some scientists believe that as much as 10 to 300 million tons of ice may reside at the moon's North and South poles. The source of the ice is thought to be from one or more comets that struck the moon's surface four billion years ago. (It is thought that Earth's water may have come from comets as well.) Unfortunately, the moon's small size and lack of an atmosphere caused it to lose nearly all of its accumulated water to space. Any water that does remain on the moon would likely be on the poles, hidden in craters and depressions shaded from the Sun.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Illustration of a deep crater on the surface of the moon. Water

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Artist's concept of how Saturn may appear from the icy surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's eight major satellites. At a distance of 148 thousand miles, Saturn would subtend an angle of 29∫ in Enceladus' sky, about the same width as 58 Earth moon's lined up side-by-side. . While the surface of Enceladus is as reflective as new fallen snow, it would probably appear leaden about an hour before sunrise with a crescent Saturn as the only source of illumination. Like all of Saturn's major satellites, Enceladus always keeps the same side facing its host planet. From the perspective of a stationary observer on Enceladus, Saturn would always appear in the same position in the sky, cycling through its phases in about one-and-half Earth days. . This image also illustrates a phenomenon only recently discovered by NASA's Cassini probe: sunlight reflecting off of Saturn's rings casts a faint glow onto the cloud tops of Saturn's night side. The illumination is about the same as three of Earth's full moon combined.Artist's concept of how Saturn may appear from the icy surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's eight major satellites. At a distance of 148 thousand miles, Saturn would subtend an angle of 29∫ in Enceladus' sky, about the same width as 58 Earth moon's lined up side-by-side. . While the surface of Enceladus is as reflective as new fallen snow, it would probably appear leaden about an hour before sunrise with a crescent Saturn as the only source of illumination. Like all of Saturn's major satellites, Enceladus always keeps the same side facing its host planet. From the perspective of a stationary observer on Enceladus, Saturn would always appear in the same position in the sky, cycling through its phases in about one-and-half Earth days. . This image also illustrates a phenomenon only recently discovered by NASA's Cassini probe: sunlight reflecting off of Saturn's rings casts a faint glow onto the cloud tops of Saturn's night side. The illumination is about the same as three of Earth's full moon combined.Artist's concept of how Saturn may appear from the icy surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's eight major satellites. At a distance of 148 thousand miles, Saturn would subtend an angle of 29∫ in Enceladus' sky, about the same width as 58 Earth moon's lined up side-by-side. . While the surface of Enceladus is as reflective as new fallen snow, it would probably appear leaden about an hour before sunrise with a crescent Saturn as the only source of illumination. Like all of Saturn's major satellites, Enceladus always keeps the same side facing its host planet. From the perspective of a stationary observer on Enceladus, Saturn would always appear in the same position in the sky, cycling through its phases in about one-and-half Earth days. . This image also illustrates a phenomenon only recently discovered by NASA's Cassini probe: sunlight reflecting off of Saturn's rings casts a faint glow onto the cloud tops of Saturn's night side. The illumination is about the same as three of Earth's full moon combined.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Artist's concept of how Saturn may appear from the icy surface of

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A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This imaginary high-mass brown dwarf has a large disk. The perspective is from the equator of an airless planet, orbiting the brown dwarf at a distance of about 4 million miles. This planet's orbit is nearly aligned to the plane of the rings, hence the debris appears as a sword-like straight line.A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This imaginary high-mass brown dwarf has a large disk. The perspective is from the equator of an airless planet, orbiting the brown dwarf at a distance of about 4 million miles. This planet's orbit is nearly aligned to the plane of the rings, hence the debris appears as a sword-like straight line.A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This imaginary high-mass brown dwarf has a large disk. The perspective is from the equator of an airless planet, orbiting the brown dwarf at a distance of about 4 million miles. This planet's orbit is nearly aligned to the plane of the rings, hence the debris appears as a sword-like straight line.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a

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A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This brown dwarf is host to a disk composed primarily of asteroids and boulders. The light from the dwarf is barely enough to illuminate the surface of this primitive planet. At a distance of about 1.5 million miles, the orbit of this planet is aligned to the plane of the rings with the result that they appear as a fuzzy line occulting the brown dwarf's glowing face.A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This brown dwarf is host to a disk composed primarily of asteroids and boulders. The light from the dwarf is barely enough to illuminate the surface of this primitive planet. At a distance of about 1.5 million miles, the orbit of this planet is aligned to the plane of the rings with the result that they appear as a fuzzy line occulting the brown dwarf's glowing face.A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a brown dwarf in the sky. This brown dwarf is host to a disk composed primarily of asteroids and boulders. The light from the dwarf is barely enough to illuminate the surface of this primitive planet. At a distance of about 1.5 million miles, the orbit of this planet is aligned to the plane of the rings with the result that they appear as a fuzzy line occulting the brown dwarf's glowing face.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484448

2484448

A view across a hypothetical primitive alien planet towards a

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Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless terrain of a hypothetical moon. While it is not known if 70 Virginis b has rings, it is certainly possible. Saturn is the planet best-known for its rings of ice and stone, but all the other jovian planets in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) have rings as well. 70 Virginis b's rings would have no ice in them due to is proximity to its sun. Such rings would likely be less than 100 million years old and could have been formed from the shattered remnants of an asteroid that wondered too close to this giant planet. 70 Virginis b's eccentric orbit would increase the likelihood of its encountering other objects in orbit around 70 Virginis. . 70 Virginis b orbits 70 Virginis, a type G5V star (similar to our own sun), about 60 light years from the Earth. 70 Virginis b is believed to have over six times the mass of the planet Jupiter and orbits around its sun in an eccentric orbit once every 116 days. 70 Virginis b's average distance from its sun is about the same as that of the planet Mercury from our own sun.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484446

2484446

Extrasolar planet 70 Virginis b presides over the hot and airless

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June 17, 2008 - Full Moonrise, Lumby, British Columbia, Canada.June 17, 2008 - Full Moonrise, Lumby, British Columbia, Canada.June 17, 2008 - Full Moonrise, Lumby, British Columbia, Canada.© Yuichi Takasaka / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484283

2484283

June 17, 2008 - Full Moonrise, Lumby, British Columbia, Canada.

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February 27, 2009 - Moon and Venus Conjunction, British Columbia, Canada.February 27, 2009 - Moon and Venus Conjunction, British Columbia, Canada.February 27, 2009 - Moon and Venus Conjunction, British Columbia, Canada.© Yuichi Takasaka / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484245

2484245

February 27, 2009 - Moon and Venus Conjunction, British Columbia,

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Jupiter-sized planets were the first exoplanets to be discovered. This jupiter-sized gas giant orbits so close to its star that its atmosphere is superheated and is slowly being blown away by the star's solar wind. Jupiter-sized planets were the first exoplanets to be discovered. This jupiter-sized gas giant orbits so close to its star that its atmosphere is superheated and is slowly being blown away by the star's solar wind. Jupiter-sized planets were the first exoplanets to be discovered. This jupiter-sized gas giant orbits so close to its star that its atmosphere is superheated and is slowly being blown away by the star's solar wind. © Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484236

2484236

Jupiter-sized planets were the first exoplanets to be discovered.

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The asteroid Ida, viewed at close range by the Galileo spacecraft, was discovered to have a tiny moon, Dactyl, orbiting it. In this view Dactyl hovers in the sky of Ida.
The asteroid Ida, viewed at close range by the Galileo spacecraft, was discovered to have a tiny moon, Dactyl, orbiting it. In this view Dactyl hovers in the sky of Ida. The asteroid Ida, viewed at close range by the Galileo spacecraft, was discovered to have a tiny moon, Dactyl, orbiting it. In this view Dactyl hovers in the sky of Ida. © Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484223

2484223

The asteroid Ida, viewed at close range by the Galileo

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The Martian sun sets behind Curiosity as it struggles up the rugged slopes of Mount Sharp. If it succeeds in its climb, the rover will have completed the longest, highest extraterrestrial mountaineering journey ever attempted.The Martian sun sets behind Curiosity as it struggles up the rugged slopes of Mount Sharp. If it succeeds in its climb, the rover will have completed the longest, highest extraterrestrial mountaineering journey ever attempted.The Martian sun sets behind Curiosity as it struggles up the rugged slopes of Mount Sharp. If it succeeds in its climb, the rover will have completed the longest, highest extraterrestrial mountaineering journey ever attempted.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484210

2484210

The Martian sun sets behind Curiosity as it struggles up the

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NASA's Curiosity rover climbing to the summit of Mount Sharp, its ultimate destination. The floor of Gale Crater, its landing place, is five kilometres below.NASA's Curiosity rover climbing to the summit of Mount Sharp, its ultimate destination. The floor of Gale Crater, its landing place, is five kilometres below.NASA's Curiosity rover climbing to the summit of Mount Sharp, its ultimate destination. The floor of Gale Crater, its landing place, is five kilometres below.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484209

2484209

NASA's Curiosity rover climbing to the summit of Mount Sharp, its

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NASA's Curiosity rover samples a rock on the floor of Gale Crater.NASA's Curiosity rover samples a rock on the floor of Gale Crater.NASA's Curiosity rover samples a rock on the floor of Gale Crater.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484208

2484208

NASA's Curiosity rover samples a rock on the floor of Gale Crater.

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Evidence returned from orbiting spacecraft suggests that Gale Crater may have hosted a lake of liquid water sometime during its history.Evidence returned from orbiting spacecraft suggests that Gale Crater may have hosted a lake of liquid water sometime during its history.Evidence returned from orbiting spacecraft suggests that Gale Crater may have hosted a lake of liquid water sometime during its history.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484204

2484204

Evidence returned from orbiting spacecraft suggests that Gale

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Future Mars colonists may have children who have never known the earthly blue skies of their parents origin but instead call Mars home.Future Mars colonists may have children who have never known the earthly blue skies of their parents origin but instead call Mars home.Future Mars colonists may have children who have never known the earthly blue skies of their parents origin but instead call Mars home.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484202

2484202

Future Mars colonists may have children who have never known the

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The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is dwarfed by the desolate Martian desert in Gusev Crater as she makes steady progress towards the distant Columbia Hills.The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is dwarfed by the desolate Martian desert in Gusev Crater as she makes steady progress towards the distant Columbia Hills.The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is dwarfed by the desolate Martian desert in Gusev Crater as she makes steady progress towards the distant Columbia Hills.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484201

2484201

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is dwarfed by the desolate

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A dust devil dances across a crater eroded by gullies in Noachis Terra, Mars. The gullies are thought to have been eroded by liquid water flowing on Mars in geologically recent times.A dust devil dances across a crater eroded by gullies in Noachis Terra, Mars. The gullies are thought to have been eroded by liquid water flowing on Mars in geologically recent times.A dust devil dances across a crater eroded by gullies in Noachis Terra, Mars. The gullies are thought to have been eroded by liquid water flowing on Mars in geologically recent times.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484199

2484199

A dust devil dances across a crater eroded by gullies in Noachis

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A telephoto view of Curiosity; NASA’s most sophisticated Mars rover; descending into Gale Crater in August 2012. Curiosity’s two year mission will look for signs of water activity and possible ancient Martian life.A telephoto view of Curiosity; NASA’s most sophisticated Mars rover; descending into Gale Crater in August 2012. Curiosity’s two year mission will look for signs of water activity and possible ancient Martian life.A telephoto view of Curiosity; NASA’s most sophisticated Mars rover; descending into Gale Crater in August 2012. Curiosity’s two year mission will look for signs of water activity and possible ancient Martian life.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484198

2484198

A telephoto view of Curiosity; NASA’s most sophisticated Mars r

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A light winter's frost forms in Mojave Crater, trapped by the crater's mountainous walls.A light winter's frost forms in Mojave Crater, trapped by the crater's mountainous walls.A light winter's frost forms in Mojave Crater, trapped by the crater's mountainous walls.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484193

2484193

A light winter's frost forms in Mojave Crater, trapped by the

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A light fog forms in a desiccated gully in Gale Crater, Mars. The crater's 5km high central mound can be seen in the background.A light fog forms in a desiccated gully in Gale Crater, Mars. The crater's 5km high central mound can be seen in the background.A light fog forms in a desiccated gully in Gale Crater, Mars. The crater's 5km high central mound can be seen in the background.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484192

2484192

A light fog forms in a desiccated gully in Gale Crater, Mars. The

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The sun rises over Gale Crater, Mars. This is one of the prospective landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory rover.The sun rises over Gale Crater, Mars. This is one of the prospective landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory rover.The sun rises over Gale Crater, Mars. This is one of the prospective landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory rover.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484190

2484190

The sun rises over Gale Crater, Mars. This is one of the

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Dark dunes march along the floor of Gale Crater, resting on the lower reaches of the crater's central mound.Dark dunes march along the floor of Gale Crater, resting on the lower reaches of the crater's central mound.Dark dunes march along the floor of Gale Crater, resting on the lower reaches of the crater's central mound.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484189

2484189

Dark dunes march along the floor of Gale Crater, resting on the

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A lone astronaut drills into the regolith of Gale Crater with only a passing dust devil as company. The astronaut's hab can be seen in the distance and is dwarfed by the crater's 5km high central mound.A lone astronaut drills into the regolith of Gale Crater with only a passing dust devil as company. The astronaut's hab can be seen in the distance and is dwarfed by the crater's 5km high central mound.A lone astronaut drills into the regolith of Gale Crater with only a passing dust devil as company. The astronaut's hab can be seen in the distance and is dwarfed by the crater's 5km high central mound.© Steven Hobbs / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484187

2484187

A lone astronaut drills into the regolith of Gale Crater with

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Terragen render of Trail Canyon, Arizona, USA.Terragen render of Trail Canyon, Arizona, USA.Terragen render of Trail Canyon, Arizona, USA.© Rhys Taylor / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2484040

2484040

Terragen render of Trail Canyon, Arizona, USA.

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