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An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479126

2479126

An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479123

2479123

A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479119

2479119

A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus tuberculatus.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus tuberculatus.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus tuberculatus.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479118

2479118

Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus tuberculatus.

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Scutosaurus karpinskii in prehistoric waters.Scutosaurus karpinskii in prehistoric waters.Scutosaurus karpinskii in prehistoric waters.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479117

2479117

Scutosaurus karpinskii in prehistoric waters.

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Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479116

2479116

Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.

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Styracosaurus in a forest.Styracosaurus in a forest.Styracosaurus in a forest.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479114

2479114

Styracosaurus in a forest.

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A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479102

2479102

A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a

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Prehistoric glyptodonts of the genus Doedicurus graze on grassy plains 25,000 years ago in what is today South America. In the background is a giant ground sloth of the genus Eremotherium. . With a turtle-like shell five feet tall and weighing over two tons, Doedicurus was the largest known glyptodontid, an extinct family of heavily-armored herbivores related to modern armadillos. Doedicurus carried a large spiked tail that could have helped protect it from large predators and other Doedicurus. . Eremotherium was a Megatheriid that grew to 20 feet long and weighed up to three tons.Prehistoric glyptodonts of the genus Doedicurus graze on grassy plains 25,000 years ago in what is today South America. In the background is a giant ground sloth of the genus Eremotherium. . With a turtle-like shell five feet tall and weighing over two tons, Doedicurus was the largest known glyptodontid, an extinct family of heavily-armored herbivores related to modern armadillos. Doedicurus carried a large spiked tail that could have helped protect it from large predators and other Doedicurus. . Eremotherium was a Megatheriid that grew to 20 feet long and weighed up to three tons.Prehistoric glyptodonts of the genus Doedicurus graze on grassy plains 25,000 years ago in what is today South America. In the background is a giant ground sloth of the genus Eremotherium. . With a turtle-like shell five feet tall and weighing over two tons, Doedicurus was the largest known glyptodontid, an extinct family of heavily-armored herbivores related to modern armadillos. Doedicurus carried a large spiked tail that could have helped protect it from large predators and other Doedicurus. . Eremotherium was a Megatheriid that grew to 20 feet long and weighed up to three tons.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479091

2479091

Prehistoric glyptodonts of the genus Doedicurus graze on grassy

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A glyptodont of the genus Doedicurus from 25,000 years ago is compared to modern armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus). Doedicurus is five feet tall, weighs about 2,200 pounds, while the armadillos (in this image nine-banded armadillos) are about 20 inches long and each weighing about ten pounds. Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.A glyptodont of the genus Doedicurus from 25,000 years ago is compared to modern armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus). Doedicurus is five feet tall, weighs about 2,200 pounds, while the armadillos (in this image nine-banded armadillos) are about 20 inches long and each weighing about ten pounds. Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.A glyptodont of the genus Doedicurus from 25,000 years ago is compared to modern armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus). Doedicurus is five feet tall, weighs about 2,200 pounds, while the armadillos (in this image nine-banded armadillos) are about 20 inches long and each weighing about ten pounds. Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479090

2479090

A glyptodont of the genus Doedicurus from 25,000 years ago is

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A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479089

2479089

A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the

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A pair of 3-ton herbivorous proboscidean mammals, a male and female of the genus Platybelodon, follow a shallow stream 9 million years ago in what is today North America. Sharing the scene are stilts (genus Himantopus) foraging for insects and small crustaceans. . Related to modern elephants, Platybelodon were approximately the same size, and in addition to upper tusks they had a pair of flattened shovel tusks on their lower jaw. These lower tusks may have been used to scoop up aquatic and semi-aquatic vegetation and/or scrape edible bark from trees. Platybelodon fossils have been found in North America, Eurasia and Africa. This genus became extinct about 6 million years ago.
A pair of 3-ton herbivorous proboscidean mammals, a male and female of the genus Platybelodon, follow a shallow stream 9 million years ago in what is today North America. Sharing the scene are stilts (genus Himantopus) foraging for insects and small crustaceans. . Related to modern elephants, Platybelodon were approximately the same size, and in addition to upper tusks they had a pair of flattened shovel tusks on their lower jaw. These lower tusks may have been used to scoop up aquatic and semi-aquatic vegetation and/or scrape edible bark from trees. Platybelodon fossils have been found in North America, Eurasia and Africa. This genus became extinct about 6 million years ago. A pair of 3-ton herbivorous proboscidean mammals, a male and female of the genus Platybelodon, follow a shallow stream 9 million years ago in what is today North America. Sharing the scene are stilts (genus Himantopus) foraging for insects and small crustaceans. . Related to modern elephants, Platybelodon were approximately the same size, and in addition to upper tusks they had a pair of flattened shovel tusks on their lower jaw. These lower tusks may have been used to scoop up aquatic and semi-aquatic vegetation and/or scrape edible bark from trees. Platybelodon fossils have been found in North America, Eurasia and Africa. This genus became extinct about 6 million years ago. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479086

2479086

A pair of 3-ton herbivorous proboscidean mammals, a male and

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An adult Platybelodon from 9 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Platybelodon is 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.An adult Platybelodon from 9 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Platybelodon is 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.An adult Platybelodon from 9 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Platybelodon is 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479085

2479085

An adult Platybelodon from 9 million years ago is compared to a

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An adult Paraceratherium (AKA Indricotherium and Baluchitherium) from 30 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Paraceratherium is 18 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 40,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . Paraceratherium is the largest mammal known to have walked the Earth and are from an extinct family of hornless rhinoceroses that ranged across North America, Europe, and Asia from 60 to 20 million years ago. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Paraceratherium (AKA Indricotherium and Baluchitherium) from 30 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Paraceratherium is 18 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 40,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . Paraceratherium is the largest mammal known to have walked the Earth and are from an extinct family of hornless rhinoceroses that ranged across North America, Europe, and Asia from 60 to 20 million years ago. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Paraceratherium (AKA Indricotherium and Baluchitherium) from 30 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Paraceratherium is 18 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 40,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . Paraceratherium is the largest mammal known to have walked the Earth and are from an extinct family of hornless rhinoceroses that ranged across North America, Europe, and Asia from 60 to 20 million years ago. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479084

2479084

An adult Paraceratherium (AKA Indricotherium and Baluchitherium)

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20-foot-long, 1-ton mahajangasuchid crocodyliforms of the genus Kaprosuchus mill about at water's edge near a baobab tree 95 million years ago in what is today Africa. A distant relative of the crocodile, and somewhat larger than modern saltwater crocodiles, Kaprosuchus is notable for boar-like tusks that that project above and below its skull (lending it the nickname BoarCroc). With legs longer than modern crocodiles', Kaprosuchus may have roamed Africa's plains in search of prey which likely included dinosaurs. . Baobabs, trees of the genus Adansonia from the mallow family, are large, drought-resistant trees with very thick trunks (a much as 40 feet in diameter) and growing as tall as 100 feet. The thick trunks can store an enormous amount of water. Baobabs are deciduous, shedding their leaves during the dry season. . The ground foliage is made up of varieties of fern while the reed-like water plants are in fact horsetails.20-foot-long, 1-ton mahajangasuchid crocodyliforms of the genus Kaprosuchus mill about at water's edge near a baobab tree 95 million years ago in what is today Africa. A distant relative of the crocodile, and somewhat larger than modern saltwater crocodiles, Kaprosuchus is notable for boar-like tusks that that project above and below its skull (lending it the nickname BoarCroc). With legs longer than modern crocodiles', Kaprosuchus may have roamed Africa's plains in search of prey which likely included dinosaurs. . Baobabs, trees of the genus Adansonia from the mallow family, are large, drought-resistant trees with very thick trunks (a much as 40 feet in diameter) and growing as tall as 100 feet. The thick trunks can store an enormous amount of water. Baobabs are deciduous, shedding their leaves during the dry season. . The ground foliage is made up of varieties of fern while the reed-like water plants are in fact horsetails.20-foot-long, 1-ton mahajangasuchid crocodyliforms of the genus Kaprosuchus mill about at water's edge near a baobab tree 95 million years ago in what is today Africa. A distant relative of the crocodile, and somewhat larger than modern saltwater crocodiles, Kaprosuchus is notable for boar-like tusks that that project above and below its skull (lending it the nickname BoarCroc). With legs longer than modern crocodiles', Kaprosuchus may have roamed Africa's plains in search of prey which likely included dinosaurs. . Baobabs, trees of the genus Adansonia from the mallow family, are large, drought-resistant trees with very thick trunks (a much as 40 feet in diameter) and growing as tall as 100 feet. The thick trunks can store an enormous amount of water. Baobabs are deciduous, shedding their leaves during the dry season. . The ground foliage is made up of varieties of fern while the reed-like water plants are in fact horsetails.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479082

2479082

20-foot-long, 1-ton mahajangasuchid crocodyliforms of the genus

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An adult Elasmotherium from 2 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Elasmotherium is over 7 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Elasmotherium from 2 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Elasmotherium is over 7 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Elasmotherium from 2 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Elasmotherium is over 7 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479080

2479080

An adult Elasmotherium from 2 million years ago is compared to a

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A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479079

2479079

A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus

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15-foot-long, 750 pound aetosaurian archosaurs of the genus Desmatosuchus search for edible roots amidst cycads and ferns 230 million years ago in what is today Texas. Armored plates and spikes, with some spikes up to 18 inches long, helped protect this otherwise vulnerable crocodile-like herbivore from the many terrestrial predators of the period including rauisuchian archosaurs like Postosuchus. Desmatosuchus is also notable for its unusual pig-like head and shovel-like snout which were likely well-suited for uprooting small plants.15-foot-long, 750 pound aetosaurian archosaurs of the genus Desmatosuchus search for edible roots amidst cycads and ferns 230 million years ago in what is today Texas. Armored plates and spikes, with some spikes up to 18 inches long, helped protect this otherwise vulnerable crocodile-like herbivore from the many terrestrial predators of the period including rauisuchian archosaurs like Postosuchus. Desmatosuchus is also notable for its unusual pig-like head and shovel-like snout which were likely well-suited for uprooting small plants.15-foot-long, 750 pound aetosaurian archosaurs of the genus Desmatosuchus search for edible roots amidst cycads and ferns 230 million years ago in what is today Texas. Armored plates and spikes, with some spikes up to 18 inches long, helped protect this otherwise vulnerable crocodile-like herbivore from the many terrestrial predators of the period including rauisuchian archosaurs like Postosuchus. Desmatosuchus is also notable for its unusual pig-like head and shovel-like snout which were likely well-suited for uprooting small plants.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479074

2479074

15-foot-long, 750 pound aetosaurian archosaurs of the genus

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An adult Deinotherium from 7 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Deinotherium is 16 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 17,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.An adult Deinotherium from 7 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Deinotherium is 16 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 17,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.An adult Deinotherium from 7 million years ago is compared to a modern adult African Elephant (genus Loxodonta). The Deinotherium is 16 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 17,000 pounds, while the African Elephant is 11 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 10,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479073

2479073

An adult Deinotherium from 7 million years ago is compared to a

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An adult Brontotherium from 35 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Brontotherium is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Brontotherium from 35 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Brontotherium is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.An adult Brontotherium from 35 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Brontotherium is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 9,000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds. . * Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479070

2479070

An adult Brontotherium from 35 million years ago is compared to a

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A 30-foot-long, 10 ton juvenile titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur of the genus Antarctosaurus is approached from behind by a 25-foot-long, two ton adult abelisaurid theropod dinosaur of the genus Abelisaurus, deep in a forest in what is today Argentina. Likely a fierce predator, Abelisaurus resembled the larger Tyrannosaurus Rex that was to roam North America 10 million years later. Antarctosaurus was an herbivore that may have grown to 60 feet long and weighed up to 100 tons. Antarctosaurus had a squarish, blunt head with peg-shaped teeth.A 30-foot-long, 10 ton juvenile titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur of the genus Antarctosaurus is approached from behind by a 25-foot-long, two ton adult abelisaurid theropod dinosaur of the genus Abelisaurus, deep in a forest in what is today Argentina. Likely a fierce predator, Abelisaurus resembled the larger Tyrannosaurus Rex that was to roam North America 10 million years later. Antarctosaurus was an herbivore that may have grown to 60 feet long and weighed up to 100 tons. Antarctosaurus had a squarish, blunt head with peg-shaped teeth.A 30-foot-long, 10 ton juvenile titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur of the genus Antarctosaurus is approached from behind by a 25-foot-long, two ton adult abelisaurid theropod dinosaur of the genus Abelisaurus, deep in a forest in what is today Argentina. Likely a fierce predator, Abelisaurus resembled the larger Tyrannosaurus Rex that was to roam North America 10 million years later. Antarctosaurus was an herbivore that may have grown to 60 feet long and weighed up to 100 tons. Antarctosaurus had a squarish, blunt head with peg-shaped teeth.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479068

2479068

A 30-foot-long, 10 ton juvenile titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur

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Deinotherium traverse the rolling plains of what is today Europe. A prehistoric relative of modern elephants, Deinotherium was larger and had a shorter trunk and downward-curving tusks attached to its lower jaw. Deinotherium is the third largest land mammal known to have existed; only Paraceratherium and some mammoths were larger. Deinotherium likely behaved like modern elephants and may have lived side-by-side with the early human ancestor Australopithecus.Deinotherium traverse the rolling plains of what is today Europe. A prehistoric relative of modern elephants, Deinotherium was larger and had a shorter trunk and downward-curving tusks attached to its lower jaw. Deinotherium is the third largest land mammal known to have existed; only Paraceratherium and some mammoths were larger. Deinotherium likely behaved like modern elephants and may have lived side-by-side with the early human ancestor Australopithecus.Deinotherium traverse the rolling plains of what is today Europe. A prehistoric relative of modern elephants, Deinotherium was larger and had a shorter trunk and downward-curving tusks attached to its lower jaw. Deinotherium is the third largest land mammal known to have existed; only Paraceratherium and some mammoths were larger. Deinotherium likely behaved like modern elephants and may have lived side-by-side with the early human ancestor Australopithecus.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479066

2479066

Deinotherium traverse the rolling plains of what is today Europe.

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A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree while her infant son stands nearby in a scene from 30 million years ago during the Rupelian Stage of the Oligocene Epoch in northwest China. Also in this scene on the lower left is a Palaeolagus, an extinct genus of the order lagomorpha, which includes modern hares, rabbits and pikas. On the lower right is a Palaeosciurus, the earliest known ground squirrel. Flying overhead are passerine ancestors of today's perching songbirds. . More massive than a modern African elephant, Paraceratherium is believed to be the largest mammal ever to have walked the Earth. Adult Paraceratherium are estimated to have been 18 ft tall at the shoulder with a maximum raised head height of 26 ft. They may have weighed as much as 20 tons. Related to modern rhinoceroses, Paraceratherium became extinct about 23 million years ago.A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree while her infant son stands nearby in a scene from 30 million years ago during the Rupelian Stage of the Oligocene Epoch in northwest China. Also in this scene on the lower left is a Palaeolagus, an extinct genus of the order lagomorpha, which includes modern hares, rabbits and pikas. On the lower right is a Palaeosciurus, the earliest known ground squirrel. Flying overhead are passerine ancestors of today's perching songbirds. . More massive than a modern African elephant, Paraceratherium is believed to be the largest mammal ever to have walked the Earth. Adult Paraceratherium are estimated to have been 18 ft tall at the shoulder with a maximum raised head height of 26 ft. They may have weighed as much as 20 tons. Related to modern rhinoceroses, Paraceratherium became extinct about 23 million years ago.A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree while her infant son stands nearby in a scene from 30 million years ago during the Rupelian Stage of the Oligocene Epoch in northwest China. Also in this scene on the lower left is a Palaeolagus, an extinct genus of the order lagomorpha, which includes modern hares, rabbits and pikas. On the lower right is a Palaeosciurus, the earliest known ground squirrel. Flying overhead are passerine ancestors of today's perching songbirds. . More massive than a modern African elephant, Paraceratherium is believed to be the largest mammal ever to have walked the Earth. Adult Paraceratherium are estimated to have been 18 ft tall at the shoulder with a maximum raised head height of 26 ft. They may have weighed as much as 20 tons. Related to modern rhinoceroses, Paraceratherium became extinct about 23 million years ago.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479061

2479061

A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar

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A pack of dire wolves crosses paths with two mammoths 150 thousand years ago during the Upper (Tarantian) Pleistocene Epoch in North America. A late fall dusting of snow heralds the coming winter. This was a period of glaciation known in North America as the Illinoian Stage when the Laurentide ice sheet covered much of the continent to a depth of 2 miles. . . The extinct Dire Wolf was closely related to the modern Gray Wolf, though is not the direct ancestor of known wolf today. The Dire Wolf was larger and stockier than the Gray Wolf with proportionally shorter legs. Mammoths were close relatives of modern elephants and approximately the same size, though Asian mammoths were somewhat larger than their American cousins. Mammoths had massive tusks. Both mammoths and dire wolves disappeared from the North American continent about ten thousand years ago.A pack of dire wolves crosses paths with two mammoths 150 thousand years ago during the Upper (Tarantian) Pleistocene Epoch in North America. A late fall dusting of snow heralds the coming winter. This was a period of glaciation known in North America as the Illinoian Stage when the Laurentide ice sheet covered much of the continent to a depth of 2 miles. . . The extinct Dire Wolf was closely related to the modern Gray Wolf, though is not the direct ancestor of known wolf today. The Dire Wolf was larger and stockier than the Gray Wolf with proportionally shorter legs. Mammoths were close relatives of modern elephants and approximately the same size, though Asian mammoths were somewhat larger than their American cousins. Mammoths had massive tusks. Both mammoths and dire wolves disappeared from the North American continent about ten thousand years ago.A pack of dire wolves crosses paths with two mammoths 150 thousand years ago during the Upper (Tarantian) Pleistocene Epoch in North America. A late fall dusting of snow heralds the coming winter. This was a period of glaciation known in North America as the Illinoian Stage when the Laurentide ice sheet covered much of the continent to a depth of 2 miles. . . The extinct Dire Wolf was closely related to the modern Gray Wolf, though is not the direct ancestor of known wolf today. The Dire Wolf was larger and stockier than the Gray Wolf with proportionally shorter legs. Mammoths were close relatives of modern elephants and approximately the same size, though Asian mammoths were somewhat larger than their American cousins. Mammoths had massive tusks. Both mammoths and dire wolves disappeared from the North American continent about ten thousand years ago.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479060

2479060

A pack of dire wolves crosses paths with two mammoths 150

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A pair of male Elasmotherium confront one another on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Elasmotherium had longer legs than today's smaller modern rhinos, probably enabling it to gallop like a horse.A pair of male Elasmotherium confront one another on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Elasmotherium had longer legs than today's smaller modern rhinos, probably enabling it to gallop like a horse.A pair of male Elasmotherium confront one another on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Elasmotherium had longer legs than today's smaller modern rhinos, probably enabling it to gallop like a horse.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479059

2479059

A pair of male Elasmotherium confront one another on the ancient

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An Elasmotherium grazes on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Characterized by a single massive horn (up to 6 feet long), Elasmotherium was a giant herbivorous mammal active in Eurasia about 3 million years ago. Related to modern rhinos, Elasmotherium was more massive, standing about 8 feet tall at the shoulder and up to 26 feet long and weighing over 3 tons. . . Elasmotherium should not be confused with the smaller and extinct woolly rhinoceros which emerged about 2 million years after the appearance of the first Elasmotherium.An Elasmotherium grazes on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Characterized by a single massive horn (up to 6 feet long), Elasmotherium was a giant herbivorous mammal active in Eurasia about 3 million years ago. Related to modern rhinos, Elasmotherium was more massive, standing about 8 feet tall at the shoulder and up to 26 feet long and weighing over 3 tons. . . Elasmotherium should not be confused with the smaller and extinct woolly rhinoceros which emerged about 2 million years after the appearance of the first Elasmotherium.An Elasmotherium grazes on the ancient steppe of what is today Southern Russia. Characterized by a single massive horn (up to 6 feet long), Elasmotherium was a giant herbivorous mammal active in Eurasia about 3 million years ago. Related to modern rhinos, Elasmotherium was more massive, standing about 8 feet tall at the shoulder and up to 26 feet long and weighing over 3 tons. . . Elasmotherium should not be confused with the smaller and extinct woolly rhinoceros which emerged about 2 million years after the appearance of the first Elasmotherium.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479058

2479058

An Elasmotherium grazes on the ancient steppe of what is today

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Brontotherium wander the lush Late Eocene landscape of South Dakota 35 million years ago. . Modern rhinoceroses have a symbiotic relationship with birds (variously known as oxpeckers or tick birds) that eat parasites they find on the rhino's skin and noisily warn of danger. No doubt similar symbiotic relationships existed between birds and the megafauna of the Eocene.Brontotherium wander the lush Late Eocene landscape of South Dakota 35 million years ago. . Modern rhinoceroses have a symbiotic relationship with birds (variously known as oxpeckers or tick birds) that eat parasites they find on the rhino's skin and noisily warn of danger. No doubt similar symbiotic relationships existed between birds and the megafauna of the Eocene.Brontotherium wander the lush Late Eocene landscape of South Dakota 35 million years ago. . Modern rhinoceroses have a symbiotic relationship with birds (variously known as oxpeckers or tick birds) that eat parasites they find on the rhino's skin and noisily warn of danger. No doubt similar symbiotic relationships existed between birds and the megafauna of the Eocene.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479057

2479057

Brontotherium wander the lush Late Eocene landscape of South

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An Oligocene Brontotherium leaves his forest habitat in search of a vegetarian meal. 35 million years ago North America was home to brontotheres, a family of large herbivores that looked somewhat like giant rhinoceroses, but probably were more closely related to horses. Brontotherium ('thunder beast') was one such genus of these prehistoric mammals. Characterized by a massive forked or sling-shot shaped horn, Brontotherium stood about eight feet tall at the shoulder and weighed about two tons.An Oligocene Brontotherium leaves his forest habitat in search of a vegetarian meal. 35 million years ago North America was home to brontotheres, a family of large herbivores that looked somewhat like giant rhinoceroses, but probably were more closely related to horses. Brontotherium ('thunder beast') was one such genus of these prehistoric mammals. Characterized by a massive forked or sling-shot shaped horn, Brontotherium stood about eight feet tall at the shoulder and weighed about two tons.An Oligocene Brontotherium leaves his forest habitat in search of a vegetarian meal. 35 million years ago North America was home to brontotheres, a family of large herbivores that looked somewhat like giant rhinoceroses, but probably were more closely related to horses. Brontotherium ('thunder beast') was one such genus of these prehistoric mammals. Characterized by a massive forked or sling-shot shaped horn, Brontotherium stood about eight feet tall at the shoulder and weighed about two tons.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479056

2479056

An Oligocene Brontotherium leaves his forest habitat in search of

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A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479054

2479054

A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479053

2479053

An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a

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An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479051

2479051

An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a

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A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479050

2479050

A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river

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A massive, 30-ton Shonisaurus, the largest known ichthyosaur (marine reptile) attempts to make a meal of a school of squid-like Belemnites. On the far right is a prehistoric shark, and further below is an ancient Ammonite, another squid-like animal with a nautilus-like hard shell. . 230 million years ago Panthalassa, the vast global ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea, was home to the ichthyosaurs, giant air-breathing reptiles that resembled fish and dolphins. Like modern day dolphins and whales, ichthyosaurs are believed to have evolved from land reptiles that moved back into the water. Ichthyosaurs are notable for having the largest eyes of any land or sea animal. The eye socket of one fossil Shonisaurus skull is over 3 feet in diameter.A massive, 30-ton Shonisaurus, the largest known ichthyosaur (marine reptile) attempts to make a meal of a school of squid-like Belemnites. On the far right is a prehistoric shark, and further below is an ancient Ammonite, another squid-like animal with a nautilus-like hard shell. . 230 million years ago Panthalassa, the vast global ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea, was home to the ichthyosaurs, giant air-breathing reptiles that resembled fish and dolphins. Like modern day dolphins and whales, ichthyosaurs are believed to have evolved from land reptiles that moved back into the water. Ichthyosaurs are notable for having the largest eyes of any land or sea animal. The eye socket of one fossil Shonisaurus skull is over 3 feet in diameter.A massive, 30-ton Shonisaurus, the largest known ichthyosaur (marine reptile) attempts to make a meal of a school of squid-like Belemnites. On the far right is a prehistoric shark, and further below is an ancient Ammonite, another squid-like animal with a nautilus-like hard shell. . 230 million years ago Panthalassa, the vast global ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea, was home to the ichthyosaurs, giant air-breathing reptiles that resembled fish and dolphins. Like modern day dolphins and whales, ichthyosaurs are believed to have evolved from land reptiles that moved back into the water. Ichthyosaurs are notable for having the largest eyes of any land or sea animal. The eye socket of one fossil Shonisaurus skull is over 3 feet in diameter.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479046

2479046

A massive, 30-ton Shonisaurus, the largest known ichthyosaur

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A pair of 50 ton Sauroposeidon feed on the leaves of an American Sycamore 110 million years ago during the Early Cretaceous Period in what is today southeastern Oklahoma. In the background flying reptiles known as pterosaurs glide across the sky. . A plant-eating giant, Sauroposeidon is the tallest known dinosaur with a neck that could reach up to 56 feet high. Sauroposeidon is also one of the longest and heaviest of all dinosaurs.A pair of 50 ton Sauroposeidon feed on the leaves of an American Sycamore 110 million years ago during the Early Cretaceous Period in what is today southeastern Oklahoma. In the background flying reptiles known as pterosaurs glide across the sky. . A plant-eating giant, Sauroposeidon is the tallest known dinosaur with a neck that could reach up to 56 feet high. Sauroposeidon is also one of the longest and heaviest of all dinosaurs.A pair of 50 ton Sauroposeidon feed on the leaves of an American Sycamore 110 million years ago during the Early Cretaceous Period in what is today southeastern Oklahoma. In the background flying reptiles known as pterosaurs glide across the sky. . A plant-eating giant, Sauroposeidon is the tallest known dinosaur with a neck that could reach up to 56 feet high. Sauroposeidon is also one of the longest and heaviest of all dinosaurs.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479045

2479045

A pair of 50 ton Sauroposeidon feed on the leaves of an American

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An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479042

2479042

An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a

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A pair of three-ton plant-eating Parasaurolophus feed on flora near a waterfall 75 million years ago in North America. Similar to plant-eating Lambeosaurus of the same period, these dinosaurs also sported a distinctive hollow cranial crest.A pair of three-ton plant-eating Parasaurolophus feed on flora near a waterfall 75 million years ago in North America. Similar to plant-eating Lambeosaurus of the same period, these dinosaurs also sported a distinctive hollow cranial crest.A pair of three-ton plant-eating Parasaurolophus feed on flora near a waterfall 75 million years ago in North America. Similar to plant-eating Lambeosaurus of the same period, these dinosaurs also sported a distinctive hollow cranial crest.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479041

2479041

A pair of three-ton plant-eating Parasaurolophus feed on flora

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Three Ouranosaurus drink at a watering hole while a menacing Sarcosuchus floats nearby 110 million years ago in what is today Africa. The environment is moderately arid with Prickly Juniper and other hardy conifers dominating the ruddy landscape. . Ouranosaurus was a variety of Iguanodont, a group of large plant-eating dinosaurs. At about 24 feet long and 4 tons, Ouranosaurus was unusual in that its skeleton suggests it had a large hump on its back. The hump may have served as a reservoir for water and/or source of nutrition for lean times as they do for modern bison and camels. . Sarcosuchus, a distant relative of the crocodile, was one of the largest giant crocodile-like reptiles that ever lived. 30-40 feet long and weighing 8 to 10 tons, Sarcosuchus was almost twice as long as the modern saltwater crocodile. It would have been a formidable threat even to a beast as large as the Ouranosaurus.Three Ouranosaurus drink at a watering hole while a menacing Sarcosuchus floats nearby 110 million years ago in what is today Africa. The environment is moderately arid with Prickly Juniper and other hardy conifers dominating the ruddy landscape. . Ouranosaurus was a variety of Iguanodont, a group of large plant-eating dinosaurs. At about 24 feet long and 4 tons, Ouranosaurus was unusual in that its skeleton suggests it had a large hump on its back. The hump may have served as a reservoir for water and/or source of nutrition for lean times as they do for modern bison and camels. . Sarcosuchus, a distant relative of the crocodile, was one of the largest giant crocodile-like reptiles that ever lived. 30-40 feet long and weighing 8 to 10 tons, Sarcosuchus was almost twice as long as the modern saltwater crocodile. It would have been a formidable threat even to a beast as large as the Ouranosaurus.Three Ouranosaurus drink at a watering hole while a menacing Sarcosuchus floats nearby 110 million years ago in what is today Africa. The environment is moderately arid with Prickly Juniper and other hardy conifers dominating the ruddy landscape. . Ouranosaurus was a variety of Iguanodont, a group of large plant-eating dinosaurs. At about 24 feet long and 4 tons, Ouranosaurus was unusual in that its skeleton suggests it had a large hump on its back. The hump may have served as a reservoir for water and/or source of nutrition for lean times as they do for modern bison and camels. . Sarcosuchus, a distant relative of the crocodile, was one of the largest giant crocodile-like reptiles that ever lived. 30-40 feet long and weighing 8 to 10 tons, Sarcosuchus was almost twice as long as the modern saltwater crocodile. It would have been a formidable threat even to a beast as large as the Ouranosaurus.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479040

2479040

Three Ouranosaurus drink at a watering hole while a menacing

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Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. 
Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479039

2479039

Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant

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A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479038

2479038

A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest

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An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479037

2479037

An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a

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In a scene 75 million years ago from what's now Montana, a six ton male Lambeosaurus rears onto its massive hind legs in response to a possible threat, while a female and juvenile Lambeosaurus drink near the river's edge. Lambeosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur known for its distinctive hollow cranial crest, which in the best-known species resembled a hatchet. The purpose of the crest is unknown. . Also featured here are Late Cretaceous Period flora including the now extinct tree fern Tempskya and species of flowering Magnolia similar to the Southern Magnolia we know today. Modern birds were just making their appearance, though avian fossils from this period are rare.In a scene 75 million years ago from what's now Montana, a six ton male Lambeosaurus rears onto its massive hind legs in response to a possible threat, while a female and juvenile Lambeosaurus drink near the river's edge. Lambeosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur known for its distinctive hollow cranial crest, which in the best-known species resembled a hatchet. The purpose of the crest is unknown. . Also featured here are Late Cretaceous Period flora including the now extinct tree fern Tempskya and species of flowering Magnolia similar to the Southern Magnolia we know today. Modern birds were just making their appearance, though avian fossils from this period are rare.In a scene 75 million years ago from what's now Montana, a six ton male Lambeosaurus rears onto its massive hind legs in response to a possible threat, while a female and juvenile Lambeosaurus drink near the river's edge. Lambeosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur known for its distinctive hollow cranial crest, which in the best-known species resembled a hatchet. The purpose of the crest is unknown. . Also featured here are Late Cretaceous Period flora including the now extinct tree fern Tempskya and species of flowering Magnolia similar to the Southern Magnolia we know today. Modern birds were just making their appearance, though avian fossils from this period are rare.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479035

2479035

In a scene 75 million years ago from what's now Montana, a six

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A pair of massive Isisaurus colberti wander lush plains 70 million years ago in what is today central India. Formerly known as Titanosaurus colberti, Isisaurus colberti was a leaf-eating herbivore that grew up to 60 feet long and weighed as much as 15 tons.A pair of massive Isisaurus colberti wander lush plains 70 million years ago in what is today central India. Formerly known as Titanosaurus colberti, Isisaurus colberti was a leaf-eating herbivore that grew up to 60 feet long and weighed as much as 15 tons.A pair of massive Isisaurus colberti wander lush plains 70 million years ago in what is today central India. Formerly known as Titanosaurus colberti, Isisaurus colberti was a leaf-eating herbivore that grew up to 60 feet long and weighed as much as 15 tons.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479034

2479034

A pair of massive Isisaurus colberti wander lush plains 70

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A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later.
A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479031

2479031

A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is

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An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479030

2479030

An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a

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Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls pass overhead 150 million years ago in what is today North America. 115 feet long and weighing over 10 tons, from the tip of tail to its diminutive head Diplodocus is the longest known dinosaur.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479028

2479028

Vegetarian Diplodocus leisurely graze while several pterodactyls

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A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479023

2479023

A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479022

2479022

An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to

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A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs deep within a Cretaceous forest 95 million years ago. The heavily armored Crichtonsaurus was a herbivore and therefore unlikely to have any interest in frogs as food, while the carnivorous frogs are doubtless in search of smaller prey. The forest is populated with various ferns and the conifer-like Wollemi Pine (not a true conifer, rather an Araucariaceae more closely related to the Monkey Puzzle tree).© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479020

2479020

A ten-foot-long Crichtonsaurus crosses paths with a pair of frogs

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A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479014

2479014

A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million

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A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479013

2479013

A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million

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