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Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian SeaCommon cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom floating in the sea, Miseno, Campania, Italy. Tyrrhenian Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2395291

Common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) eating a discarded condom

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Golden spiny ant (Polyrhachis proxima) carrying injured sibling.Golden spiny ant (Polyrhachis proxima) carrying injured sibling.Golden spiny ant (Polyrhachis proxima) carrying injured sibling.© Husni Che Ngah / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Golden spiny ant (Polyrhachis proxima) carrying injured sibling.

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Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) yawning at covert in white winter coat in the Alps, Valais, Switzerland.Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) yawning at covert in white winter coat in the Alps, Valais, Switzerland.Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) yawning at covert in white winter coat in the Alps, Valais, Switzerland.© Olivier Born / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) yawning at covert in white winter

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Octopus (Octopus sp) spreading its tentacles in the lagoon, Mayotte, Indian Ocean.Octopus (Octopus sp) spreading its tentacles in the lagoon, Mayotte, Indian Ocean.Octopus (Octopus sp) spreading its tentacles in the lagoon, Mayotte, Indian Ocean.© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2091184

Octopus (Octopus sp) spreading its tentacles in the lagoon,

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Brown bear (Ursus arctos), Bavarian Forest National Park, GermanyBrown bear (Ursus arctos), Bavarian Forest National Park, GermanyBrown bear (Ursus arctos), Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany© Massimiliano Sticca / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2064537

Brown bear (Ursus arctos), Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany

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Tokeh (Gekko gecko), IndonesiaTokeh (Gekko gecko), IndonesiaTokeh (Gekko gecko), Indonesia© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2064173

Tokeh (Gekko gecko), Indonesia

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Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming past melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming past melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming past melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, Canada© Paul Souders / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2050870

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming past melting iceberg near

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Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) climbing onto melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) climbing onto melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) climbing onto melting iceberg near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, Canada© Paul Souders / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2050868

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) climbing onto melting iceberg near

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Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming through melting sea ice near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming through melting sea ice near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming through melting sea ice near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, Canada© Paul Souders / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2050862

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) swimming through melting sea ice

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Polar Bear and young cub (Ursus maritimus) cling to melting sea ice at sunset near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear and young cub (Ursus maritimus) cling to melting sea ice at sunset near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, CanadaPolar Bear and young cub (Ursus maritimus) cling to melting sea ice at sunset near Harbour Islands, Repulse Bay, Nunavut Territory, Canada© Paul Souders / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2050841

Polar Bear and young cub (Ursus maritimus) cling to melting sea

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Portrait of a polar bear. Close-up. Canada.Portrait of a polar bear. Close-up. Canada.Portrait of a polar bear. Close-up. Canada.© Andrey Gudkov / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2050770

Portrait of a polar bear. Close-up. Canada.

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West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan LaboratoryWest African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan Laboratory© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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2030219

West African Gabon viper's venom removal in a laboratory. Latoxan

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Adelie penguins walking on snow - AntarcticaAdelie penguins walking on snow - AntarcticaAdelie penguins walking on snow - Antarctica© Meril Darees / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2016154

Adelie penguins walking on snow - Antarctica

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Dew on common lady's mantle leafDew on common lady's mantle leafDew on common lady's mantle leaf© Antoni Agelet / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

1365202

Dew on common lady's mantle leaf

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San hunter armed with traditional bow and arrow with cheetah ; In the private reserve named "N/a’an ku sê", welfare programs and health support converge to maintain populations of Bushmen in good health and to reintroduce the wild Cheetahs. This nomadic group of hunter-gatherers has a history dating back over 20,000 years. Their close relationship and perfect their knowledge of animals allowed to live and feed in the deserts of southern Africa.San hunter armed with traditional bow and arrow with cheetahSan hunter armed with traditional bow and arrow with cheetah ; In the private reserve named "N/a’an ku sê", welfare programs and health support converge to maintain populations of Bushmen in good health and to reintroduce the wild Cheetahs. This nomadic group of hunter-gatherers has a history dating back over 20,000 years. Their close relationship and perfect their knowledge of animals allowed to live and feed in the deserts of southern Africa.© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1028788

San hunter armed with traditional bow and arrow with cheetah ; In

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Cheetah on dune with desert landscape in back ground Namibia ; In the private reserve named "N/a’an ku sê", welfare programs and health support converge to maintain populations of Bushmen in good health and to reintroduce the wild Cheetahs. This nomadic group of hunter-gatherers has a history dating back over 20,000 years. Their close relationship and perfect their knowledge of animals allowed to live and feed in the deserts of southern Africa.Cheetah on dune with desert landscape in back ground NamibiaCheetah on dune with desert landscape in back ground Namibia ; In the private reserve named "N/a’an ku sê", welfare programs and health support converge to maintain populations of Bushmen in good health and to reintroduce the wild Cheetahs. This nomadic group of hunter-gatherers has a history dating back over 20,000 years. Their close relationship and perfect their knowledge of animals allowed to live and feed in the deserts of southern Africa.© Martin Harvey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Germany and UK
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1027253

Cheetah on dune with desert landscape in back ground Namibia ; In

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Polar bear cub cuddled against its mother anaesthetizedPolar bear cub cuddled against its mother anaesthetizedPolar bear cub cuddled against its mother anaesthetized© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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613456

Polar bear cub cuddled against its mother anaesthetized

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Red Fox resting in grass England Red Fox resting in grass England Red Fox resting in grass England © Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

584274

Red Fox resting in grass England 

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Marijuana plantMarijuana plantMarijuana plant© Marcos Veiga / Visual and Written - Photo Collection / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2011022

Marijuana plant

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Asian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South AfricaAsian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South AfricaAsian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South Africa© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2429875

Asian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private

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Asian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South AfricaAsian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South AfricaAsian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private reserve, South Africa© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2429857

Asian (Bengal) Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), resting, Private

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Nettoyage d'une oreille de chatNettoyage d'une oreille de chatNettoyage d'une oreille de chat© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2429179

Nettoyage d'une oreille de chat

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Cover of a health and vaccination booklet for catsCover of a health and vaccination booklet for catsCover of a health and vaccination booklet for cats© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2429178

Cover of a health and vaccination booklet for cats

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Vaccination of a competition pigeon, Pas de Calais, FranceVaccination of a competition pigeon, Pas de Calais, FranceVaccination of a competition pigeon, Pas de Calais, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Vaccination of a competition pigeon, Pas de Calais, France

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farmer worming sheep, englandfarmer worming sheep, englandfarmer worming sheep, england© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2427229

farmer worming sheep, england

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Farmers checking sheep, EnglandFarmers checking sheep, EnglandFarmers checking sheep, England© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2427228

Farmers checking sheep, England

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2427071

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2427070

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2427069

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2427068

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a bag, many of them die because they can not feed or amputate a member. It is not a local problem, it is universal. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2427067

Loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta). Exemplary entangled with a

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Calderón tropical (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with scars and scratches caused by interactions between individuals of the same species, although so many marks are not common. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Calderón tropical (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with scars and scratches caused by interactions between individuals of the same species, although so many marks are not common. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Calderón tropical (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with scars and scratches caused by interactions between individuals of the same species, although so many marks are not common. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2426382

Calderón tropical (Globicephala macrorhynchus) with scars and

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424327

Treating Koi pond

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424326

Treating Koi pond

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Treating Koi pondTreating Koi pondTreating Koi pond© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424325

Treating Koi pond

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Cyphotilapia gibberosa "bleu" Pimbwé, soinsCyphotilapia gibberosa "bleu" Pimbwé, soinsCyphotilapia gibberosa "bleu" Pimbwé, soins© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424302

Cyphotilapia gibberosa "bleu" Pimbwé, soins

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Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Bleu Mpimbwé', soinsCyphotilapia gibberosa 'Bleu Mpimbwé', soinsCyphotilapia gibberosa 'Bleu Mpimbwé', soins© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2424301

Cyphotilapia gibberosa 'Bleu Mpimbwé', soins

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Sooty Gull (Ichthyaetus hemprichii), adult with missing foot in winter plumage standing on a rock, Dhofar, OmanSooty Gull (Ichthyaetus hemprichii), adult with missing foot in winter plumage standing on a rock, Dhofar, OmanSooty Gull (Ichthyaetus hemprichii), adult with missing foot in winter plumage standing on a rock, Dhofar, Oman© Saverio Gatto / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2423132

Sooty Gull (Ichthyaetus hemprichii), adult with missing foot in

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Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) young yawning, Vosges, FranceRed fox (Vulpes vulpes) young yawning, Vosges, FranceRed fox (Vulpes vulpes) young yawning, Vosges, France© Fabrice Cahez / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2422310

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) young yawning, Vosges, France

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Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) Male with a missing tusk on a beach, SvalbardWalrus (Odobenus rosmarus) Male with a missing tusk on a beach, SvalbardWalrus (Odobenus rosmarus) Male with a missing tusk on a beach, Svalbard© Raphaël Sané / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2420983

Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) Male with a missing tusk on a beach,

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Tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis)Tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis)Tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis)© Matthijs Kuijpers / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420748

Tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis)

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Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420132

Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic

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Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during bandingEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during bandingEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during banding© Thierry Vezon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419731

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during

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Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during bandingEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during bandingEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during banding© Thierry Vezon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419726

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile held during

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Leg bands fo an an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenileLeg bands fo an an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenileLeg bands fo an an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) juvenile© Thierry Vezon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419722

Leg bands fo an an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus)

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Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) eggsEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) eggsEgyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) eggs© Thierry Vezon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419721

Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) eggs

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Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419398

Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive

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Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Monaco. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419397

Dead fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive

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Dead young fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Villefranche-sur-Mer. France. Mediterranean.Dead young fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Villefranche-sur-Mer. France. Mediterranean.Dead young fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Villefranche-sur-Mer. France. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419396

Dead young fan mussel in a seagrass, Mediterranean Sea. Massive

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Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419395

Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality

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Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419394

Dead fan mussel and diver, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality

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Dead fan mussel, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.Dead fan mussel, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble Pen Shell (Pinna nobilis) infected with the parasite Haplosporidium. Porticcio. Corsica. Mediterranean.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2419393

Dead fan mussel, Mediterranean Sea. Massive mortality of Noble

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Lion (Panthera leo) male yawning, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, TanzaniaLion (Panthera leo) male yawning, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, TanzaniaLion (Panthera leo) male yawning, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti, Tanzania© Pierluigi Rizzato / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2418009

Lion (Panthera leo) male yawning, Ngorongoro Conservation Area,

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415966

Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415965

Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415964

Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of

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Ibex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415963

Ibex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an

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Ibex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415962

Ibex (Capra ibex) crossing snow, Using a receiving antenna, an

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415961

Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of

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Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in mist, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceAlpine Chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in mist, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceAlpine Chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in mist, Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415960

Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in mist, Using a receiving

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415959

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Using a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, FranceUsing a receiving antenna, an agent of the National Office of Hunting and Wildlife (ONCFS), locates and studies the movement of animals equipped with transmitter, Alps, Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415958

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Guards observing Ibex (Capra ibex), Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceGuards observing Ibex (Capra ibex), Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceGuards observing Ibex (Capra ibex), Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415956

Guards observing Ibex (Capra ibex), Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415955

Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415954

Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415953

Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415952

Ibex (Capra ibex) grazing, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415951

Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415950

Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex population in the Bargy Massif in prevention of the disease (Brucellosis), Alps Haute-Savoie, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415949

Ibex (Capra ibex) at rest, Follow-up of the Alpine ibex

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Ibex (Capra ibex) males, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) males, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) males, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415948

Ibex (Capra ibex) males, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in

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Ibex (Capra ibex) young, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) young, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) young, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415947

Ibex (Capra ibex) young, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in

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Ibex (Capra ibex) male, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) male, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, FranceIbex (Capra ibex) male, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in Haute-Savoie, Alps, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415946

Ibex (Capra ibex) male, Followed by Alpine ibex populations in

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Southern swallowtail (Iphiclides podalirius) End of life with damaged wings in summer, Campagne, Lorraine, FranceSouthern swallowtail (Iphiclides podalirius) End of life with damaged wings in summer, Campagne, Lorraine, FranceSouthern swallowtail (Iphiclides podalirius) End of life with damaged wings in summer, Campagne, Lorraine, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2415185

Southern swallowtail (Iphiclides podalirius) End of life with

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Beach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, FranceBeach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, FranceBeach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411131

Beach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin,

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Beach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, FranceBeach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, FranceBeach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin, Brittany, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411130

Beach ashtrays distributed by the municipality of Plérin,

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Portrait of Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra), Tangkoko National Park, Sulawesi, IndonesiaPortrait of Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra), Tangkoko National Park, Sulawesi, IndonesiaPortrait of Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra), Tangkoko National Park, Sulawesi, Indonesia© Patrick Kientz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2410397

Portrait of Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra), Tangkoko

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Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) comes to eat as well as African vultures (Gyps africanus) an African savanna Elephant or Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana), killed, killed by anthrax, Chobe river, Chobe National Park,BostwanaNile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) comes to eat as well as African vultures (Gyps africanus) an African savanna Elephant or Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana), killed, killed by anthrax, Chobe river, Chobe National Park,BostwanaNile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) comes to eat as well as African vultures (Gyps africanus) an African savanna Elephant or Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana), killed, killed by anthrax, Chobe river, Chobe National Park,Bostwana© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2410309

Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) comes to eat as well as

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Harvest of walnuts affected by walnut blightHarvest of walnuts affected by walnut blightHarvest of walnuts affected by walnut blight© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2409798

Harvest of walnuts affected by walnut blight

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White Rhino (Ceratotherium simum) Old male showing wounds and scars from territorial fighting, Sabi Sands, South AfricaWhite Rhino (Ceratotherium simum) Old male showing wounds and scars from territorial fighting, Sabi Sands, South AfricaWhite Rhino (Ceratotherium simum) Old male showing wounds and scars from territorial fighting, Sabi Sands, South Africa© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408260

White Rhino (Ceratotherium simum) Old male showing wounds and

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Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) Vet examining adult female rescued by the Human Orangutan Conflict Response Unit who was evacuated out of clearcut forest area and later released into a national park Aceh Province, Sumatra, IndonesiaSumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) Vet examining adult female rescued by the Human Orangutan Conflict Response Unit who was evacuated out of clearcut forest area and later released into a national park Aceh Province, Sumatra, IndonesiaSumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) Vet examining adult female rescued by the Human Orangutan Conflict Response Unit who was evacuated out of clearcut forest area and later released into a national park Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia© Suzi Eszterhas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408227

Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) Vet examining adult female

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Maple syrup fall near Saint Jean lake, Québec, CanadaMaple syrup fall near Saint Jean lake, Québec, CanadaMaple syrup fall near Saint Jean lake, Québec, Canada© Adrien Wehrlé / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2407636

Maple syrup fall near Saint Jean lake, Québec, Canada

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A Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) takes advantage of a free meal from a wounded Hippo (Hippopotamus amphibius) in the Maasai Mara, Kenya.A Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) takes advantage of a free meal from a wounded Hippo (Hippopotamus amphibius) in the Maasai Mara, Kenya.A Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) takes advantage of a free meal from a wounded Hippo (Hippopotamus amphibius) in the Maasai Mara, Kenya.© Tesni Ward / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2407001

A Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus) takes advantage

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, swimming in aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, swimming in aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, swimming in aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405140

Zebrafish, Danio rerio, swimming in aquarium. Since the 1930s,

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405139

Zebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405138

Zebrafish, Danio rerio, fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405137

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), fry on aquarium. Since the 1930s, zebra

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Newborn Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish are used to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma on humans. Melanocytes, the same cells that are are responsible for the pigmentation of zebrafish stripes and for human skin color, are also where melanoma originates. Researchers have now used zebrafish to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma. FranceNewborn Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish are used to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma on humans. Melanocytes, the same cells that are are responsible for the pigmentation of zebrafish stripes and for human skin color, are also where melanoma originates. Researchers have now used zebrafish to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma. FranceNewborn Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish are used to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma on humans. Melanocytes, the same cells that are are responsible for the pigmentation of zebrafish stripes and for human skin color, are also where melanoma originates. Researchers have now used zebrafish to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405136

Newborn Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish are used to identify a

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405135

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), used on cancer research. The use of

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405134

Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405133

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405132

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405131

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405130

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. FranceZebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a powerful tool for studying human cancers. Transgenic techniques have been employed to model different types of tumors, including leukemia, melanoma, glioblastoma and endocrine tumors. Transplantation of human cancer cells in embryos or adult zebrafish offers the advantage of studying the behavior of human cancer cells in a live organism. Chemical-genetic screens using zebrafish embryos have uncovered novel druggable pathways and new therapeutic strategies, some of which are now tested in clinical trials. Zebrafish has contributed to novel discoveries or approaches to novel therapies for human cancer. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405129

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), with human cancer. Zebrafish are a

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Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405128

Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio

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Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. FranceHuman tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. Scientists inserted human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos and allowed them to grow for several days. Then added chemotherapy to the fishes’ water and found that some of the tumors shrank and others didn’t. The use of human oncogenes, often in conjunction with fluorescent reporters to aid the monitoring of tumor initiation and progression, and the isolation and in vivo imaging of cancer cells, demonstrated the cross-species ability of oncogenes to transform zebrafish cells. Similar cancer experiments have been made with mice, but the zebrafish approach may be faster and cheaper, making it accessible for more patients. Cancer research. France© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405127

Human tumor cells, colored red, growing in zebrafish (Danio

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Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USAMicroinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene function. Embryo being micro-injected into the yolk with RNA (ribonucleic acid) mixed with a red dye. One of the advantages of studying zebrafish is the ease with which specific gene products can be added to or eliminated from the embryo by microinjection. Morpholinos, which are synthetic oligonucleotides with antisense complementarity to target RNAs, can be added to the embryo to reduce the expression of a particular gene product. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405126

Microinjection of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to analyse gene

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405125

Zebrafish (Danio rerio), on casper fish form. Casper fish are the

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Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) in summer brown coat, Alps, Switzerland.Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) in summer brown coat, Alps, Switzerland.Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) in summer brown coat, Alps, Switzerland.© Olivier Born / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) in summer brown coat, Alps,

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