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Pliosaurus irgisensis attacking a shark.Pliosaurus irgisensis attacking a shark.Pliosaurus irgisensis attacking a shark.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479128

2479128

Pliosaurus irgisensis attacking a shark.

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Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal as Angustinaripterus longicephalus scavenge in the background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479127

2479127

Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis eats the carrion of a dead animal

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An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479126

2479126

An armored Saichania ankylosaurid, white background.

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Velociraptor, white background.Velociraptor, white background.Velociraptor, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479125

2479125

Velociraptor, white background.

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Velociraptor, white background.Velociraptor, white background.Velociraptor, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479124

2479124

Velociraptor, white background.

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479123

2479123

A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479122

2479122

A Baryonyx dinosaur with a fish in mouth, white background.

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Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479121

2479121

Archaeopteryx flying through a forest.

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Zupaysaurus rougieri, a theropod dinosaur of the Early Jurassic Period.Zupaysaurus rougieri, a theropod dinosaur of the Early Jurassic Period.Zupaysaurus rougieri, a theropod dinosaur of the Early Jurassic Period.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479120

2479120

Zupaysaurus rougieri, a theropod dinosaur of the Early Jurassic

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479119

2479119

A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479116

2479116

Close-up of the head of a Scutosaurus karpinskii.

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Predators Biarmosuchus tener eating the flesh of a Estemmenosuchus mirabilis.Predators Biarmosuchus tener eating the flesh of a Estemmenosuchus mirabilis.Predators Biarmosuchus tener eating the flesh of a Estemmenosuchus mirabilis.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479115

2479115

Predators Biarmosuchus tener eating the flesh of a

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A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous Period.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479113

2479113

A Baryonyx dinosaur catches a fish out of water in the Cretaceous

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A Carnotaurus eating the flesh of a dead Chubutisaurus.A Carnotaurus eating the flesh of a dead Chubutisaurus.A Carnotaurus eating the flesh of a dead Chubutisaurus.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479112

2479112

A Carnotaurus eating the flesh of a dead Chubutisaurus.

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Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479111

2479111

Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.

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Dilophosaurus wetherilli with a piece of flesh hanging out of its mouth.Dilophosaurus wetherilli with a piece of flesh hanging out of its mouth.Dilophosaurus wetherilli with a piece of flesh hanging out of its mouth.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479110

2479110

Dilophosaurus wetherilli with a piece of flesh hanging out of its

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An Inostrancevia eating the flesh of a dead Scutosaurus.An Inostrancevia eating the flesh of a dead Scutosaurus.An Inostrancevia eating the flesh of a dead Scutosaurus.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479107

2479107

An Inostrancevia eating the flesh of a dead Scutosaurus.

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Two Allosaurus europaeus with a Hypsilophodon foxii in mouth as its next meal.Two Allosaurus europaeus with a Hypsilophodon foxii in mouth as its next meal.Two Allosaurus europaeus with a Hypsilophodon foxii in mouth as its next meal.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479106

Two Allosaurus europaeus with a Hypsilophodon foxii in mouth as

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Dimetrodon limbatus, a prehistoric animal that lived during the Early Permian stage of the Paleozoic Era.Dimetrodon limbatus, a prehistoric animal that lived during the Early Permian stage of the Paleozoic Era.Dimetrodon limbatus, a prehistoric animal that lived during the Early Permian stage of the Paleozoic Era.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479105

Dimetrodon limbatus, a prehistoric animal that lived during the

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Ceratosaurus magnicornis of the Late Jurassic Period.Ceratosaurus magnicornis of the Late Jurassic Period.Ceratosaurus magnicornis of the Late Jurassic Period.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479103

Ceratosaurus magnicornis of the Late Jurassic Period.

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A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a prehistoric landscape.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479102

A Tarbosaurus dinosaur and an armored Saichania ankylosaurid in a

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Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479101

Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with

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Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479100

Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid

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A 15-foot-long, 500 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Prestosuchus wanders amidst cycads and ferns in a swamp 230 million years ago in what is today Brazil. With long powerful legs, sharp teeth and a crocodile-like body, Prestosuchus was probably an ambush predator and likely a fast runner. . In the foreground to the Prestosuchus' left is a foot-long prehistoric amphibian known as a labyrinthodont.A 15-foot-long, 500 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Prestosuchus wanders amidst cycads and ferns in a swamp 230 million years ago in what is today Brazil. With long powerful legs, sharp teeth and a crocodile-like body, Prestosuchus was probably an ambush predator and likely a fast runner. . In the foreground to the Prestosuchus' left is a foot-long prehistoric amphibian known as a labyrinthodont.A 15-foot-long, 500 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Prestosuchus wanders amidst cycads and ferns in a swamp 230 million years ago in what is today Brazil. With long powerful legs, sharp teeth and a crocodile-like body, Prestosuchus was probably an ambush predator and likely a fast runner. . In the foreground to the Prestosuchus' left is a foot-long prehistoric amphibian known as a labyrinthodont.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479088

2479088

A 15-foot-long, 500 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus

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A 12-foot-long, 1,000 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Postosuchus wanders a hilltop 220 million years ago in what is today Texas. Surrounding the Postosuchus are various cycads, ferns, and tree-like Glossopteridales. With a crocodile-like body and tyrannosaur-like head, Postosuchus was likely a fierce apex predator that preyed upon Dicynodonts and other animals smaller than itself, including some of the first dinosaurs.A 12-foot-long, 1,000 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Postosuchus wanders a hilltop 220 million years ago in what is today Texas. Surrounding the Postosuchus are various cycads, ferns, and tree-like Glossopteridales. With a crocodile-like body and tyrannosaur-like head, Postosuchus was likely a fierce apex predator that preyed upon Dicynodonts and other animals smaller than itself, including some of the first dinosaurs.A 12-foot-long, 1,000 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus Postosuchus wanders a hilltop 220 million years ago in what is today Texas. Surrounding the Postosuchus are various cycads, ferns, and tree-like Glossopteridales. With a crocodile-like body and tyrannosaur-like head, Postosuchus was likely a fierce apex predator that preyed upon Dicynodonts and other animals smaller than itself, including some of the first dinosaurs.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479087

2479087

A 12-foot-long, 1,000 pound rauisuchian archosaur of the genus

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A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus forages in a brackish mangrove-like swamp of gymnosperms of the genus Cordaites 300 million years ago in what is today Western Europe.  . Like its better-known synapsid cousin Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus had a large sail on its back supported by elongated neural spines, however unlike Dimetrodon, these spines include numerous short cross bars; while the sail may have served the purpose of both helping to regulate body temperature and as sexual display, the purpose of the cross bars is unknown. Jaw and teeth structure suggests that Edaphosaurus probably dined on both plants and small invertebrates, such as mollusks.  . Tree-like Cordaites, now extinct, grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida, numerous fossils of which are now found associated with coal deposits. Also in this image are several examples of extinct seed fern of the genus Neuropteris as well as smaller examples of generic fern that may have been present during the period.  . Other fauna include two examples of the large dragonfly-like Meganeura, a centipede, and in the foreground a juvenile prehistoric shark of the genus Xenacanthus, its distinctive spine projecting from the back of its head and out of the water.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479079

2479079

A ten-foot-long, 600 pound synapsid of the genus Edaphosaurus

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A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the species Dunkleosteus terrellix is about to make a meal of a six-foot-long primitive shark of the genus Cladoselache 370 million years ago in the Rheic Ocean near what is today North America. Dunkleosteus terrellix was one of the largest arthrodire placoderms ever to have lived. Nearly as long as a school bus, It was heavily armored and therefore likely a relatively slow, but powerful swimmer. . There are four Cladoselache/primitive sharks in this image. The schooling fish are generic representatives of the class Actinopterygii, a sub-class of the bony fishes which emerged about 420 million years ago, while the sea jellies are generic representatives of the subphylum Medusozoa.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479078

2479078

A 30-foot-long, four-ton hypercarnivorous apex predator of the

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A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a Cretaceous forest while a 30 foot long, 2,000 pound tyrannosaur forages for its next meal in what is today the western United States. Bistahieversor is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaur named after Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness where it was found. . Purgatorius is the genus for several species of small omnivorous mammals that are believed to be the among the earliest ancestors of modern-day chimps, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The extinction of the larger and more powerful dinosaurs may have been what led to world's domination by mammals today. . While there is no direct evidence that Purgatorius and Bistahieversor ever shared the same wilderness, this image is yet illustrative of the predator-prey relationship that characterized dinosaurs and mammals for many millions of years.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479067

2479067

A rat-sized Purgatorius hides amongst the undergrowth of a

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A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479054

2479054

A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479052

2479052

A seven ton Tyrannosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million

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A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479050

2479050

A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river

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A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush estuary near the ancient Tethys Ocean in what today is Northern Africa. . Suchomimus was well-armed with long claws and a long, crocodile-like snout with dozens of teeth. Given these distinctly crocodilian features, it's believed that this dinosaur, like modern day crocodiles, dined largely on fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479048

2479048

A five ton, Early Cretaceous Suchomimus snags a shark from a lush

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An eight ton Spinosaurus searches for its next meal 95 million years ago in shallow waters of what is today Egypt. With a massive crocodile-like head and enormous muscular body, this terrifying carnivore was larger than the Early Cretaceous Suchomimus and may have been mightier even than the famous Tyrannosaurus Rex of approximately the same period.An eight ton Spinosaurus searches for its next meal 95 million years ago in shallow waters of what is today Egypt. With a massive crocodile-like head and enormous muscular body, this terrifying carnivore was larger than the Early Cretaceous Suchomimus and may have been mightier even than the famous Tyrannosaurus Rex of approximately the same period.An eight ton Spinosaurus searches for its next meal 95 million years ago in shallow waters of what is today Egypt. With a massive crocodile-like head and enormous muscular body, this terrifying carnivore was larger than the Early Cretaceous Suchomimus and may have been mightier even than the famous Tyrannosaurus Rex of approximately the same period.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479047

2479047

An eight ton Spinosaurus searches for its next meal 95 million

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Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. 
Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479039

2479039

Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant

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A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479038

2479038

A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest

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A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479023

2479023

A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus is the first dinosaur to have been unearthed by paleontologists in Antarctica. This formidable predator hunted 190 million years ago during the Early Jurassic period. . . While the Earth was warmer and Antarctica closer to the equator during Cryolophosaurus' time, the continent was still far enough south for the climate to be temperate rather than tropical. Much of Antarctica was likely covered by dense forests, at least near the coasts. Cryolophosaurus' remains were found on a mountain range that would have placed it at an altitude of about 10,000 feet and 1,000 miles from the South Pole during its reign.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479021

2479021

Over 20 feet long and weighing as much as a ton, Cryolophosaurus

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What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar eclipse is in fact a brilliant and momentary flash of light signaling a massive asteroid impact on the Moon. . The Moon and all the inner planets of the Solar System show evidence of a long and violent history of encounters with meteorites and asteroids, leftover debris from the formation of the Solar System. This image depicts an asteroid colliding with the Moon about 95 million years ago. The perspective is from the surface of the Earth in what today is Egypt. The impact would have released millions of times more energy than today's largest nuclear weapon, creating a flash of light that would be far brighter than any star in the sky. . In the foreground of this image stands a wary Spinosaurus, an enormous meat-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period. Its typical length from tail tip to snout was 40-50 feet, and is believed to have weighed at least 8 tons or more.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479017

2479017

What may appear here as a diamond ring effect from a solar

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A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has ambushed by hiding in a hollow log. One fossilized example of Compsognathus has an entire lizard in its stomach, suggesting that Compsognathus may have swallowed some of its meals whole. Compsognathus also likely preyed on small insects.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479016

2479016

A Compsognathus prepares to swallow a small lizard it has

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A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150 million years ago in what is today Europe. A petit carnivore, it is believed Compsognathus was a fast and agile runner with excellent eyesight.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479015

2479015

A turkey-sized Compsognathus wanders a late Jurassic forest 150

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A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479014

2479014

A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million

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A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479013

2479013

A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million

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A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479012

2479012

A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest

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A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479011

2479011

A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77

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During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. 
During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical archipelago. In this image Archaeopteryx is depicted near the shore of the Tethys Sea. . . The Archaeopteryx is the earliest known example of a fully feathered dinosaur. Despite its resemblance to birds, Archaeopteryx has more in common with small dinosaurs, especially in regard to its clawed arms and tiny teeth. The highly evolved feathers may have permitted Archaeopteryx to glide short distances, however, it's unlikely Archaeopteryx could fly like a bird. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479009

2479009

During the late Jurassic period, Europe was a dry, tropical

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An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic Redwood forest. While it's probable that the 30 foot, 2 ton Allosaurus preyed upon large herbivores, it is doubtful that one would have risked a direct confrontation with an adult Stegosaurus, which could weigh as much as 5 tons and wields a powerful tail tipped with 3-foot spikes. Adding to its survivability, Stegosaurus' front legs may have been strong enough to allow it to pivot and swing its entire backside around to ward off an assault. . In addition to Redwoods and varieties of fern, this Jurassic-period forest includes the now extinct Pachypteris, an arboreal plant that grew to a height of 10 feet and populated every major continent 160 million years ago (in this image, the Stegosaurus is stepping back onto a Pachypteris, obliging a much smaller lizard to abandon its roost). . Was the Allosaurus really striped like Siberian tigers? Fossilized impressions of dinosaur skins reveal combinations of smooth and bony scales, and even feathers for some, but nothing has been preserved that would tell us what colors may have adorned them. Nevertheless, there are plenty of colorful modern reptiles for us to refer to, and birds, which may be the dinosaurs' closest living descendents, are among the most colorful vertebrates of all. Allosaurus reigned for 10 million years, so there was plenty of opportunity for them to evolve a wide variety of coloring schemes, if required.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479008

2479008

An Allosaurus stumbles upon a grazing Stegosaurus in a Jurassic

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A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a lush mountainside forest. The orange horns on the foreground Allosaurus identifies this as an adult male, while his female companion behind attempts to make a meal of an unfortunate terrapin. . 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period, giant Sequoias, also known as Redwoods, may have populated all of the northern continents. These evergreens grow as tall as 370 feet and some have trunk diameters exceeding 25 feet. The only living Sequoias today, and some are over 2,000 years old, occupy a narrow strip of land along the North American Pacific coast. . Some Allosaurus likely hunted in the shade of Sequoias. For 5 million years Allosaurus was the most common large carnivore in North America. Growing as long as 40 feet and weighing up to two tons, this fierce predator probably had few, if any rivals.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479007

2479007

A pair of Allosaurus search for dinner in the pre-twilight of a

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Two giant Moschops face off on a sandstone mesa 250 million years ago in what is today the Karoo region of South Africa. . Moschops was not a dinosaur, rather it was a mammal-like reptile that, like Dimetrodon, was more closely related to mammals than to true reptiles such as lizards. Moschops was a heavily-built, 4-legged herbivore that grew up to 16 feet long.Two giant Moschops face off on a sandstone mesa 250 million years ago in what is today the Karoo region of South Africa. . Moschops was not a dinosaur, rather it was a mammal-like reptile that, like Dimetrodon, was more closely related to mammals than to true reptiles such as lizards. Moschops was a heavily-built, 4-legged herbivore that grew up to 16 feet long.Two giant Moschops face off on a sandstone mesa 250 million years ago in what is today the Karoo region of South Africa. . Moschops was not a dinosaur, rather it was a mammal-like reptile that, like Dimetrodon, was more closely related to mammals than to true reptiles such as lizards. Moschops was a heavily-built, 4-legged herbivore that grew up to 16 feet long.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479001

2479001

Two giant Moschops face off on a sandstone mesa 250 million years

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A herbivorous dinocephalian therapsid grazes on a hilltop 255 million years ago in what is today in the European part of Russia near the Ural Mountains.A herbivorous dinocephalian therapsid grazes on a hilltop 255 million years ago in what is today in the European part of Russia near the Ural Mountains.A herbivorous dinocephalian therapsid grazes on a hilltop 255 million years ago in what is today in the European part of Russia near the Ural Mountains.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478995

2478995

A herbivorous dinocephalian therapsid grazes on a hilltop 255

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Resembling modern day hippopotami, three Estemmenosuchus mirabilis face off in a Paleozoic lake 255 million years ago in what is today the Perm region of Russia near the Ural Mountains. About the size of a modern adult bull, Estemmenosuchus mirabilis was a plant-eating early ancestor of today's mammals.Resembling modern day hippopotami, three Estemmenosuchus mirabilis face off in a Paleozoic lake 255 million years ago in what is today the Perm region of Russia near the Ural Mountains. About the size of a modern adult bull, Estemmenosuchus mirabilis was a plant-eating early ancestor of today's mammals.Resembling modern day hippopotami, three Estemmenosuchus mirabilis face off in a Paleozoic lake 255 million years ago in what is today the Perm region of Russia near the Ural Mountains. About the size of a modern adult bull, Estemmenosuchus mirabilis was a plant-eating early ancestor of today's mammals.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478994

2478994

Resembling modern day hippopotami, three Estemmenosuchus

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Delete permanently this lightbox?

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In case of modification, changes will be seen by your recipient.

If deleted, your album won't be avalaible for your recipient anymore.