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Bee Queen Faux Bumblebee mating on flower Bee Queen Faux Bumblebee mating on flower Bee Queen Faux Bumblebee mating on flower © Pascal Pittorino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1995407

Bee Queen Faux Bumblebee mating on flower

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. Veritable athletes built for flying, fertilization flights have been observed at more than 7 kilometres from the hive even if the average distance for fertilizations is 3 kilometres from the hive.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. Veritable athletes built for flying, fertilization flights have been observed at more than 7 kilometres from the hive even if the average distance for fertilizations is 3 kilometres from the hive.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. Veritable athletes built for flying, fertilization flights have been observed at more than 7 kilometres from the hive even if the average distance for fertilizations is 3 kilometres from the hive.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103481

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. The male bees have more developed wing muscles than the females. These muscles allow them to carry out mating flights over long distances and for a longer time. They also facilitate copulation by allowing for faster flight to catch the queen. The males' eyes are also bigger than those of the females, allowing them to better spot the queens in the congregations that number up to 10,000 males. In addition, the males' antennas cover a surface area twice as big and have 7 times more olfactory sensilla than those of the worker bees.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. The male bees have more developed wing muscles than the females. These muscles allow them to carry out mating flights over long distances and for a longer time. They also facilitate copulation by allowing for faster flight to catch the queen. The males' eyes are also bigger than those of the females, allowing them to better spot the queens in the congregations that number up to 10,000 males. In addition, the males' antennas cover a surface area twice as big and have 7 times more olfactory sensilla than those of the worker bees.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see the great size of the drone compared to other bees. The male bees have more developed wing muscles than the females. These muscles allow them to carry out mating flights over long distances and for a longer time. They also facilitate copulation by allowing for faster flight to catch the queen. The males' eyes are also bigger than those of the females, allowing them to better spot the queens in the congregations that number up to 10,000 males. In addition, the males' antennas cover a surface area twice as big and have 7 times more olfactory sensilla than those of the worker bees.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2103480

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - On a hive's flight board we can see

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2103477

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2103476

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103475

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A drone ready for take-off the flight board.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A drone ready for take-off the flight board.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A drone ready for take-off the flight board.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103426

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A drone ready for take-off the

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Drone flying over an artichoke flower in a gardenDrone flying over an artichoke flower in a gardenDrone flying over an artichoke flower in a garden© Jean-Claude N'Diaye / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents

2041448

Drone flying over an artichoke flower in a garden

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Drome and queen bee mating on a flower in an organic gardenDrome and queen bee mating on a flower in an organic gardenDrome and queen bee mating on a flower in an organic garden© Pascal Pittorino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2007782

Drome and queen bee mating on a flower in an organic garden

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Taking sperm sample on a Honey bee drone Ouessant island ; Report Honey bee of Bretagne.<br>Taking sperm sample on a Honey bee drone Ouessant islandTaking sperm sample on a Honey bee drone Ouessant island ; Report Honey bee of Bretagne.
© Jean-Louis Le Moigne / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

148973

Taking sperm sample on a Honey bee drone Ouessant island ; Report

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Drone in the middle of workers in the hive Bretagne ; Report Honey bee of Bretagne.Drone in the middle of workers in the hive BretagneDrone in the middle of workers in the hive Bretagne ; Report Honey bee of Bretagne.© Jean-Louis Le Moigne / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

148827

Drone in the middle of workers in the hive Bretagne ; Report

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Male honey bee top view FranceMale honey bee top view FranceMale honey bee top view France© Claude Jardel / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

46547

Male honey bee top view France

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