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1185 pictures found

Grass Frog eggs in a pond - Prairie Fouzon FranceGrass Frog eggs in a pond - Prairie Fouzon FranceGrass Frog eggs in a pond - Prairie Fouzon France© Bruno Guénard / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Grass Frog eggs in a pond - Prairie Fouzon France

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Frog on gelatinous mass of eggs on white background Frog on gelatinous mass of eggs on white background Frog on gelatinous mass of eggs on white background © Claudius Thiriet / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Frog on gelatinous mass of eggs on white background

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Oregon Triton eggs - Pacific Ocean Alaska Oregon Triton eggs - Pacific Ocean Alaska Oregon Triton eggs - Pacific Ocean Alaska © Bruno Guénard / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Oregon Triton eggs - Pacific Ocean Alaska

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Common toad and her eggs in a lake - France  ; BioPhotoContest 2015 (Highly commended)Common toad and her eggs in a lake - France Common toad and her eggs in a lake - France ; BioPhotoContest 2015 (Highly commended)© Rémi Masson / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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1993123

Common toad and her eggs in a lake - France ; BioPhotoContest

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Otangefin Anemonefish eggs in Sea Anemone -  Polynesia ; Day 3Otangefin Anemonefish eggs in Sea Anemone - PolynesiaOtangefin Anemonefish eggs in Sea Anemone - Polynesia ; Day 3© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Otangefin Anemonefish eggs in Sea Anemone - Polynesia ; Day 3

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Grizzly catching a Sockeye salmon in Katmai NP Alaska ; The glaucous-winged gulls are taking advantage of the captureGrizzly catching a Sockeye salmon in Katmai NP AlaskaGrizzly catching a Sockeye salmon in Katmai NP Alaska ; The glaucous-winged gulls are taking advantage of the capture© Sylvain Cordier / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Grizzly catching a Sockeye salmon in Katmai NP Alaska ; The

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European Frog mating in a lake and eggs Jura France ; p. 71European Frog mating in a lake and eggs Jura FranceEuropean Frog mating in a lake and eggs Jura France ; p. 71© Michel Loup / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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European Frog mating in a lake and eggs Jura France ; p. 71

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Broadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetusBroadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetusBroadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetus© Claude Guihard / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Broadclub Cuttlefish egg with foetus

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European frogs and lay Lake of Jura France ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"European frogs and lay Lake of Jura FranceEuropean frogs and lay Lake of Jura France ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"© Michel Loup / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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European frogs and lay Lake of Jura France ; Feature: "A fleur

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Common toad mating and egg-laying Lake of Jura France  ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"Common toad mating and egg-laying Lake of Jura France Common toad mating and egg-laying Lake of Jura France  ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"© Michel Loup / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Common toad mating and egg-laying Lake of Jura France  ; Feature:

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Common toad and frog laying in the sun Lake of Jura France ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"Common toad and frog laying in the sun Lake of Jura FranceCommon toad and frog laying in the sun Lake of Jura France ; Feature: "A fleur d'eau"© Michel Loup / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Common toad and frog laying in the sun Lake of Jura France ;

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Beaked Toad (Rhinella castaneotica) with eggs, Belizon, French GuianaBeaked Toad (Rhinella castaneotica) with eggs, Belizon, French GuianaBeaked Toad (Rhinella castaneotica) with eggs, Belizon, French Guiana© Frank Deschandol & Philippe Sabine / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Beaked Toad (Rhinella castaneotica) with eggs, Belizon, French

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Lowland frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) morula, day oneLowland frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) morula, day oneLowland frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) morula, day one© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Lowland frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) morula, day one

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Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the

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Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the Canary Islands, Tenerife.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Red-lipped blenny eggs (Ophioblennius atlanticus). Fish of the

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Buckfast bees: Queen laying in a cell, surrounded by workers, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, FranceBuckfast bees: Queen laying in a cell, surrounded by workers, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, FranceBuckfast bees: Queen laying in a cell, surrounded by workers, Lacarry, La Soule, Basque Country, France© Georges Lopez / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2455358

Buckfast bees: Queen laying in a cell, surrounded by workers,

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Red-eyed Tree Frog eggs (Agalychnis callidryas) El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.Red-eyed Tree Frog eggs (Agalychnis callidryas) El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.Red-eyed Tree Frog eggs (Agalychnis callidryas) El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, Mexico.© Jorge Figueroa / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2446354

Red-eyed Tree Frog eggs (Agalychnis callidryas) El Ocote

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Red Clingfish, Arcos rubiginosus, guards its eggs. Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Atlantic Ocean.Red Clingfish, Arcos rubiginosus, guards its eggs. Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Atlantic Ocean.Red Clingfish, Arcos rubiginosus, guards its eggs. Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Atlantic Ocean.© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2444601

Red Clingfish, Arcos rubiginosus, guards its eggs. Bonaire,

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Sicilian Leaf-cutting bee (Megachile sicula) female collecting sand to make her laying cell, Crete, GreeceSicilian Leaf-cutting bee (Megachile sicula) female collecting sand to make her laying cell, Crete, GreeceSicilian Leaf-cutting bee (Megachile sicula) female collecting sand to make her laying cell, Crete, Greece© Michel Rauch / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Sicilian Leaf-cutting bee (Megachile sicula) female collecting

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Photovoltaic cell modules on the Pointe d'Agon lighthouse in Agon-Coutainville, Normandy, FrancePhotovoltaic cell modules on the Pointe d'Agon lighthouse in Agon-Coutainville, Normandy, FrancePhotovoltaic cell modules on the Pointe d'Agon lighthouse in Agon-Coutainville, Normandy, France© Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Photovoltaic cell modules on the Pointe d'Agon lighthouse in

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2118981

Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Watering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell trayWatering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell trayWatering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Watering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell tray

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Watering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell trayWatering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell trayWatering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Watering wild companion plants after replanting into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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2118974

Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2118972

2118972

Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
2118971

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell trayReplanting wild companion plants into a cell tray© Serge Lapouge / BiosphotoJPG - RM
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Replanting wild companion plants into a cell tray

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Eggs fish, Tyrrhenian SeaEggs fish, Tyrrhenian SeaEggs fish, Tyrrhenian Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Eggs fish, Tyrrhenian Sea

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Stingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless beesStingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless beesStingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105386

Stingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The

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The nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless beesThe nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless beesThe nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105379

The nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona

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Eggs fish, Mediterranean SeaEggs fish, Mediterranean SeaEggs fish, Mediterranean Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2104328

Eggs fish, Mediterranean Sea

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Eggs fish, Mediterranean SeaEggs fish, Mediterranean SeaEggs fish, Mediterranean Sea© Pasquale Vassallo / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Eggs fish, Mediterranean Sea

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Two nurse bees inspect a royal cell.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal cell.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Nurse and wax bees around a royal

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap that seals the cell with its mandibles. The mandibles can serve as scissors, clamps, spatulas and planes. They are used to shape the wax and knead the propolis.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee hatching breaks the wax cap

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Photomontage showing the stages in the transformation of the egg into the bee in 21 days, through the larva, pupa and young bee phases. The stages are: egg 3 days, larva 8 days and from the closing of the transformation cell of the pupa to the bee 8 days.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Photomontage showing the stages in the transformation of the egg into the bee in 21 days, through the larva, pupa and young bee phases. The stages are: egg 3 days, larva 8 days and from the closing of the transformation cell of the pupa to the bee 8 days.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Photomontage showing the stages in the transformation of the egg into the bee in 21 days, through the larva, pupa and young bee phases. The stages are: egg 3 days, larva 8 days and from the closing of the transformation cell of the pupa to the bee 8 days.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Photomontage showing the stages in

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In a cell, a one-day-old egg recently laid by the queen.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In a cell, a one-day-old egg recently laid by the queen.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In a cell, a one-day-old egg recently laid by the queen.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In a cell, a one-day-old egg

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees meet the young larvae's needs by feeding them during the first 3 days with royal jelly then with a mix of honey and predigested pollen until the cell closes. The inspection of a larva by a nurse bee lasts about 20 seconds. Its weight has multiplied by 900, or 140mg, nine days later. A larva is inspected 7000 times with approximately 1100 feedings.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees meet the young larvae's needs by feeding them during the first 3 days with royal jelly then with a mix of honey and predigested pollen until the cell closes. The inspection of a larva by a nurse bee lasts about 20 seconds. Its weight has multiplied by 900, or 140mg, nine days later. A larva is inspected 7000 times with approximately 1100 feedings.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees meet the young larvae's needs by feeding them during the first 3 days with royal jelly then with a mix of honey and predigested pollen until the cell closes. The inspection of a larva by a nurse bee lasts about 20 seconds. Its weight has multiplied by 900, or 140mg, nine days later. A larva is inspected 7000 times with approximately 1100 feedings.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The nurse bees meet the young

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Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Pupa in their brood cells. Inside the closed cell, the larva metamorphoses into a pupa to form a refined insect. Some organs will disappear, new ones will appear and others will change. On the outside, these transformations translate into the formation of legs, wings and eyes.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Pupa in their brood cells. Inside the closed cell, the larva metamorphoses into a pupa to form a refined insect. Some organs will disappear, new ones will appear and others will change. On the outside, these transformations translate into the formation of legs, wings and eyes.Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Pupa in their brood cells. Inside the closed cell, the larva metamorphoses into a pupa to form a refined insect. Some organs will disappear, new ones will appear and others will change. On the outside, these transformations translate into the formation of legs, wings and eyes.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103509

Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) - Pupa in their brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Birth of a young queen surrounded by a multitude of nurse bees that sometimes help it cut through the thin wax wall that encloses the cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Birth of a young queen surrounded by a multitude of nurse bees that sometimes help it cut through the thin wax wall that encloses the cell.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Birth of a young queen surrounded by a multitude of nurse bees that sometimes help it cut through the thin wax wall that encloses the cell.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Birth of a young queen surrounded by

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cellHoney bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cellHoney bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell-Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell-© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Honeybee nurses around a royal cell-

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European Black Bee on honey (Apis mellifera mellifera) on honey cellEuropean Black Bee on honey (Apis mellifera mellifera) on honey cellEuropean Black Bee on honey (Apis mellifera mellifera) on honey cell© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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European Black Bee on honey (Apis mellifera mellifera) on honey

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood surrounded by nurse bees. The drone is born 24 days after the egg is laid and it lives approximately 50 days. The drone is the only fertile depositary of the queen's genes. It is responsible for the transmission of the genes from the queen (its mother). Like all the bees, three days after the eggs have hatched the drone larvae are first fed royal jelly. Then, the nurse bees change the food to a mix of honey and pollen. Unlike the diet of the worker bee larvae, that of the drones includes more honey.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
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2103476

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in a brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood surrounded by nurse bees. A parasite, the varroa destructor, is on one of the nurses. The varroa often use the drones' cells to raise their offspring.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of drones in the brood

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of young worker bees. The brooding period from the egg to the birth lasts 21 days for the worker bees. After laboriously extracting itself from its cell, the young bee deploys its antennas, smooths its wings and has to let its bristle dry.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of young worker bees. The brooding period from the egg to the birth lasts 21 days for the worker bees. After laboriously extracting itself from its cell, the young bee deploys its antennas, smooths its wings and has to let its bristle dry.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of young worker bees. The brooding period from the egg to the birth lasts 21 days for the worker bees. After laboriously extracting itself from its cell, the young bee deploys its antennas, smooths its wings and has to let its bristle dry.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The birth of young worker bees. The

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee inspects a royal cell filled with royal jelly. Royal jelly is essential for the development of a colony. This secretion mixed with pre-digested pollen is produced by the pharyngeal glands of the young nursing bees. It is an exceptional nutrient allowing bee larvae to grow at a pace with no equivalent in the rest of the animal kingdom.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee inspects a royal cell filled with royal jelly. Royal jelly is essential for the development of a colony. This secretion mixed with pre-digested pollen is produced by the pharyngeal glands of the young nursing bees. It is an exceptional nutrient allowing bee larvae to grow at a pace with no equivalent in the rest of the animal kingdom.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee inspects a royal cell filled with royal jelly. Royal jelly is essential for the development of a colony. This secretion mixed with pre-digested pollen is produced by the pharyngeal glands of the young nursing bees. It is an exceptional nutrient allowing bee larvae to grow at a pace with no equivalent in the rest of the animal kingdom.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee inspects a royal cell filled

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A royal cell filled with jelly. Royal jelly is exceptionally nourishing and allow bee larvae to grow like no other species in the animal kingdom. Royal jelly will allow a larva to see its weight multiply by 1,800 in five days.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A royal cell filled with jelly. Royal jelly is exceptionally nourishing and allow bee larvae to grow like no other species in the animal kingdom. Royal jelly will allow a larva to see its weight multiply by 1,800 in five days.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A royal cell filled with jelly. Royal jelly is exceptionally nourishing and allow bee larvae to grow like no other species in the animal kingdom. Royal jelly will allow a larva to see its weight multiply by 1,800 in five days.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A royal cell filled with jelly.

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