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Firefly group in forest, Po River, ItalyFirefly group in forest, Po River, ItalyFirefly group in forest, Po River, Italy© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Firefly group in forest, Po River, Italy

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Pelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French PolynesiaPelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French PolynesiaPelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the Tahiti Reef at night, French Polynesia© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents
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Pelagic Shrimp (Funchalia villosa) drifting on a Pyrosome off the

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Squid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, PhilippinesSquid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, PhilippinesSquid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, Philippines© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Squid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, Philippines

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Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites on a termite mound, Emas National Park, Brazil Highly commended NPOTY 2016Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites on a termite mound, Emas National Park, Brazil Highly commended NPOTY 2016Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites on a termite mound, Emas National Park, Brazil Highly commended NPOTY 2016© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus

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Night among star and fireflies, side of the Po river in the north of ItalyNight among star and fireflies, side of the Po river in the north of ItalyNight among star and fireflies, side of the Po river in the north of Italy© Alberto Ghizzi Panizza / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Night among star and fireflies, side of the Po river in the north

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Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayotteBigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayotteBigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian

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Portrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayottePortrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayottePortrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Portrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night,

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Portrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayottePortrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, MayottePortrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night, Indian Ocean, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Portrait of Bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at night,

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Deep-Sea Pelagic Eel, Egypt, Red Sea.Deep-Sea Pelagic Eel, Egypt, Red Sea.Deep-Sea Pelagic Eel, Egypt, Red Sea.© Jeffrey Rotman / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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Deep-Sea Pelagic Eel, Egypt, Red Sea.

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Firefly (Lampyris noctiluca) in the night during swarming time in June, on Midsummer nightFirefly (Lampyris noctiluca) in the night during swarming time in June, on Midsummer nightFirefly (Lampyris noctiluca) in the night during swarming time in June, on Midsummer night© Zoltan Ritzel / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Firefly (Lampyris noctiluca) in the night during swarming time in

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Ancistrocheirus lesueuri Larvae ; Size: 3 cm<br>Deep : -20m<br><br>BBC Wildlife photographer of the Year: Finalist 2014 - Underwater SpeciesAncistrocheirus lesueuri LarvaeAncistrocheirus lesueuri Larvae ; Size: 3 cm
Deep : -20m

BBC Wildlife photographer of the Year: Finalist 2014 - Underwater Species
© Fabien Michenet / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents

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Ancistrocheirus lesueuri Larvae ; Size: 3 cm
Deep :

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Milky Way and Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic France ; Phosphorescent plankton light up the shore where small waves come to die. In the sky, the Milky Way at the Three Belles Summer.Milky Way and Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic FranceMilky Way and Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic France ; Phosphorescent plankton light up the shore where small waves come to die. In the sky, the Milky Way at the Three Belles Summer.© Laurent Laveder / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Milky Way and Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic France ;

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Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic FrancePhosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic FrancePhosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic France© Laurent Laveder / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Phosphorescent plankton - Isle of Hœdic France

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Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France  ; The phosphorescent plankton lights in the roll of a wave that breaks on the sand of a beach on the island of Houat. On the horizon, the Hoëdic Island.Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France ; The phosphorescent plankton lights in the roll of a wave that breaks on the sand of a beach on the island of Houat. On the horizon, the Hoëdic Island.© Laurent Laveder / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France ; The

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Milky Way and phosphorescent plankton - Hœdic France  ; Phosphorescent plankton light up the shore where small waves come to die. In the sky, the Milky Way Scorpio Swan.Milky Way and phosphorescent plankton - Hœdic France Milky Way and phosphorescent plankton - Hœdic France ; Phosphorescent plankton light up the shore where small waves come to die. In the sky, the Milky Way Scorpio Swan.© Laurent Laveder / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Milky Way and phosphorescent plankton - Hœdic France ;

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Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France ; The rollers breaking on the beach of st Treac'h Goured are illuminated by the presence of phosphorescent plankton. In the sky, the Milky Way between Scorpio and Sagittarius is beautiful.Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat FranceMilky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France ; The rollers breaking on the beach of st Treac'h Goured are illuminated by the presence of phosphorescent plankton. In the sky, the Milky Way between Scorpio and Sagittarius is beautiful.© Laurent Laveder / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Milky Way and phosporescent plankton - Ile d'Houat France ; The

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Portrait of a Sloane's viperfishPortrait of a Sloane's viperfishPortrait of a Sloane's viperfish© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Portrait of a Sloane's viperfish

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Half-naked hatchetfishesHalf-naked hatchetfishesHalf-naked hatchetfishes© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Half-naked hatchetfishes

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Fluorescent  Mushroom Coral Komodo IndonesiaFluorescent Mushroom Coral Komodo IndonesiaFluorescent Mushroom Coral Komodo Indonesia© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Fluorescent Mushroom Coral Komodo Indonesia

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Marine luminescence at caribbean beach under sky full of stars, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa RicaMarine luminescence at caribbean beach under sky full of stars, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa RicaMarine luminescence at caribbean beach under sky full of stars, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica© Greg Basco / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Marine luminescence at caribbean beach under sky full of stars,

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(Mnemiopsis leidyi), the warty comb jelly or sea walnut. Only in springtime, when the hard winter slowly subsides, are the ice-cold waters suitable for divers who can dive around a iceberg that floats in crystal-clear water, Tasiilaq, East Greenland(Mnemiopsis leidyi), the warty comb jelly or sea walnut. Only in springtime, when the hard winter slowly subsides, are the ice-cold waters suitable for divers who can dive around a iceberg that floats in crystal-clear water, Tasiilaq, East Greenland(Mnemiopsis leidyi), the warty comb jelly or sea walnut. Only in springtime, when the hard winter slowly subsides, are the ice-cold waters suitable for divers who can dive around a iceberg that floats in crystal-clear water, Tasiilaq, East Greenland© Franco Banfi / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

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(Mnemiopsis leidyi), the warty comb jelly or sea walnut. Only in

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara with Nude Ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid ctenophore, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Venus Girdle, Cestid

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, blue light 450 nm Wideangle view of partial fuorescence in branching corals, D: 15 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, blue light 450 nm Wideangle view of partial fuorescence in branching corals, D: 15 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, blue light 450 nm Wideangle view of partial fuorescence in branching corals, D: 15 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Acropora table corals; center: a gamete? Macro photography, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Acropora table corals; center: a gamete? Macro photography, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Acropora table corals; center: a gamete? Macro photography, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea Fuorescence in colony of Pearl bubble coral (Physogyra lichtensteini) Macro photography, D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea Fuorescence in colony of Pearl bubble coral (Physogyra lichtensteini) Macro photography, D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea Fuorescence in colony of Pearl bubble coral (Physogyra lichtensteini) Macro photography, D: 8 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals, Macro UV photography, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals, Macro UV photography, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals, Macro UV photography, D: 7 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals Macro UV photography, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals Macro UV photography, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Fuorescence in colony of Favia corals Macro UV photography, D: 7 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guine, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guine, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guine, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in Favia colony, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in table coral (orange), D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in table coral (orange), D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in table coral (orange), D: 10 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral. 1 radiated UV light at a wavelength of 400 nm, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral. 1 radiated UV light at a wavelength of 400 nm, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral. 1 radiated UV light at a wavelength of 400 nm, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral, 1 blue light 450 nm, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral, 1 blue light 450 nm, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence in staghorn coral, 1 blue light 450 nm, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence, D: 10 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence. Stitched UV panorama 8924 x 3994 px, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence. Stitched UV panorama 8924 x 3994 px, D: 10 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence. Stitched UV panorama 8924 x 3994 px, D: 10 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Coral fluorescence.D: 8 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, papua New Guinea, Acropora gemmifera under UV lighting, emitting fluorescence. Coral fluorescence, produced by special fluorescent proteins, is a relatively poorly understood phenomenon, but researchers think it could help protect the coral from damaging sunlight, or possibly other forms of stress. D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, papua New Guinea, Acropora gemmifera under UV lighting, emitting fluorescence. Coral fluorescence, produced by special fluorescent proteins, is a relatively poorly understood phenomenon, but researchers think it could help protect the coral from damaging sunlight, or possibly other forms of stress. D: 8 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, papua New Guinea, Acropora gemmifera under UV lighting, emitting fluorescence. Coral fluorescence, produced by special fluorescent proteins, is a relatively poorly understood phenomenon, but researchers think it could help protect the coral from damaging sunlight, or possibly other forms of stress. D: 8 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409056

Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409055

Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops

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Detail of a cauliflower jellyfish, Bouéni Pass, MayotteDetail of a cauliflower jellyfish, Bouéni Pass, MayotteDetail of a cauliflower jellyfish, Bouéni Pass, Mayotte© Gabriel Barathieu / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2408058

Detail of a cauliflower jellyfish, Bouéni Pass, Mayotte

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408019

Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408007

Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407998

European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407997

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407996

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407995

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407994

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405133

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405132

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405131

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although

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Pineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris, inside underwater cave. Two fish in cofrontation. Note first dorsal fin spines raised. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite imagePineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris, inside underwater cave. Two fish in cofrontation. Note first dorsal fin spines raised. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite imagePineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris, inside underwater cave. Two fish in cofrontation. Note first dorsal fin spines raised. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403429

Pineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris, inside underwater cave. Two

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Pineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite imagePineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite imagePineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris. The pineapplefish is a weak swimmer and a nocturnal species found inside caves and under rocky ledges during the day. Use it's light organs to iluminate it's preys and to communicate with fish of the same species. The light of the pineapplefish is produced by symbiotic colonies of the bacteria Vibrio fischeri within its photophores, luminescent organ on the side of lower jaw. Queensland. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403428

Pineapplefish, Cleidopus gloriamaris. The pineapplefish is a weak

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Ijima's snaggletooth, Astronesthes ijimai. It's a mesoplagic species that lives on continental slopes and seamounts from 150 to 550 m deep. Note photophores; light organs. Photophores on fish are used for attracting food or for camouflage from predators by counter-illumination. From Indonesia. Composite imageIjima's snaggletooth, Astronesthes ijimai. It's a mesoplagic species that lives on continental slopes and seamounts from 150 to 550 m deep. Note photophores; light organs. Photophores on fish are used for attracting food or for camouflage from predators by counter-illumination. From Indonesia. Composite imageIjima's snaggletooth, Astronesthes ijimai. It's a mesoplagic species that lives on continental slopes and seamounts from 150 to 550 m deep. Note photophores; light organs. Photophores on fish are used for attracting food or for camouflage from predators by counter-illumination. From Indonesia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2403425

Ijima's snaggletooth, Astronesthes ijimai. It's a mesoplagic

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Northern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. AzoresNorthern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. AzoresNorthern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory deep-sea species that normally lives in near darkness at depths of 915 to 1,830 m. Note the red and green bioluminescent organs beneath eye. Give off far-red light, which is invisible to nearly all other life in the ocean depths. These organs give the fish an advantage over its competitors, since the far-red light they emit enables the fish to illuminate potential prey and to communicate with others of its own species without betraying its presence. Azores© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2401766

Northern stoplight loosejaw, Malacosteus niger. Is a predatory

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Squid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, PhilippinesSquid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, PhilippinesSquid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, Philippines© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

2395678

Squid (Sepioteuthis sp) at night, Moalboal, Philippines

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Flashlight fish, Photoblepharon steinitzi. With diver. Note bioluminescent organs under eyes Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageFlashlight fish, Photoblepharon steinitzi. With diver. Note bioluminescent organs under eyes Composite image. Portugal. Composite imageFlashlight fish, Photoblepharon steinitzi. With diver. Note bioluminescent organs under eyes Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168065

Flashlight fish, Photoblepharon steinitzi. With diver. Note

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Atlantic batfish, Dibranchus atlanticus. NamibiaAtlantic batfish, Dibranchus atlanticus. NamibiaAtlantic batfish, Dibranchus atlanticus. Namibia© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168030

Atlantic batfish, Dibranchus atlanticus. Namibia

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Asphodelus albus, White asphodel, flowers. Showing fluorescent colors when photographed ultraviolet light. PortugalAsphodelus albus, White asphodel, flowers. Showing fluorescent colors when photographed ultraviolet light. PortugalAsphodelus albus, White asphodel, flowers. Showing fluorescent colors when photographed ultraviolet light. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2168025

Asphodelus albus, White asphodel, flowers. Showing fluorescent

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Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites and Great anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) digging termite mound, Emas National Park, BrazilBioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites and Great anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) digging termite mound, Emas National Park, BrazilBioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus nyctophanus) attracting flying termites and Great anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) digging termite mound, Emas National Park, Brazil© Marcio Cabral / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2165793

Bioluminescent larvae of Headlight Beetles (Pyrophorus

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Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), KerguelenJewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), KerguelenJewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), Kerguelen© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152490

Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), Kerguelen

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Bioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, JapanBioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, JapanBioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, Japan© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152489

Bioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa,

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Bioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, JapanBioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, JapanBioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa, Japan© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152488

Bioluminescent cloud emitted by an Abyssinian shrimp, Okinawa,

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Green Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), AustraliaGreen Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), AustraliaGreen Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), Australia© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152487

Green Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp),

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Green Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), AustraliaGreen Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), AustraliaGreen Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp), Australia© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152486

Green Bioluminescence of a Brittle Star (Ophionereis sp),

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Eye of Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), KerguelenEye of Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), KerguelenEye of Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), Kerguelen© Jérôme Mallefet - FNRS-UCL / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2152485

Eye of Jewel Squid (Histioteuthis eltaninae), Kerguelen

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