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128 pictures found

Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) coming to feed his young in his nest dug in the clay bank of a small river of Bugey, Ain, FranceCommon Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) coming to feed his young in his nest dug in the clay bank of a small river of Bugey, Ain, FranceCommon Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) coming to feed his young in his nest dug in the clay bank of a small river of Bugey, Ain, France© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) coming to feed his young in his

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Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on pine trees in Tenerife. These lichens grow abundantly on trees growing at sea level of clouds linked to the trade winds - Teide NP - Tenerife - Canary IslandsOld Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on pine trees in Tenerife. These lichens grow abundantly on trees growing at sea level of clouds linked to the trade winds - Teide NP - Tenerife - Canary IslandsOld Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on pine trees in Tenerife. These lichens grow abundantly on trees growing at sea level of clouds linked to the trade winds - Teide NP - Tenerife - Canary Islands© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on pine trees in Tenerife. These

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Smooth cauliflower Coral (Stylophora pistillata). Heron Island. Great Barrier Reef. Queensland. Autralia.Smooth cauliflower Coral (Stylophora pistillata). Heron Island. Great Barrier Reef. Queensland. Autralia.Smooth cauliflower Coral (Stylophora pistillata). Heron Island. Great Barrier Reef. Queensland. Autralia.© Jean-Michel Mille / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Smooth cauliflower Coral (Stylophora pistillata). Heron Island.

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Vue mi-air mi-eau devant le village de Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Espagne. Biocénose des algues photophiles.Vue mi-air mi-eau devant le village de Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Espagne. Biocénose des algues photophiles.Vue mi-air mi-eau devant le village de Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Espagne. Biocénose des algues photophiles.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Vue mi-air mi-eau devant le village de Calella de Palafrugell,

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Split view of Brown algae (Cystoseira sp) in front of the former fishing village Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Spain. Cystoseira are bio-indicators of good water quality.Split view of Brown algae (Cystoseira sp) in front of the former fishing village Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Spain. Cystoseira are bio-indicators of good water quality.Split view of Brown algae (Cystoseira sp) in front of the former fishing village Calella de Palafrugell, Costa Brava, Spain. Cystoseira are bio-indicators of good water quality.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Split view of Brown algae (Cystoseira sp) in front of the former

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Tree completely covered with lichens, Montesinho Natural Park, Northeastern PortugalTree completely covered with lichens, Montesinho Natural Park, Northeastern PortugalTree completely covered with lichens, Montesinho Natural Park, Northeastern Portugal© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tree completely covered with lichens, Montesinho Natural Park,

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Sea Butterfly. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanSea Butterfly. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanSea Butterfly. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in open ocean at 20-40 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet below. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Sea Butterfly. Photographed during a Blackwater drift dive in

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Mating Pteropods. Black water drift dive in open ocean at 30 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanMating Pteropods. Black water drift dive in open ocean at 30 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic OceanMating Pteropods. Black water drift dive in open ocean at 30 feet with bottom at 500 plus feet. Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A. Atlantic Ocean© Steven Kovacs / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Mating Pteropods. Black water drift dive in open ocean at 30 feet

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Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on tree, Maido, Reunion IslandOld Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on tree, Maido, Reunion IslandOld Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on tree, Maido, Reunion Island© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2411991

Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata) on tree, Maido, Reunion Island

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), in diverse color versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2405132

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and yellow versions.

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GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USAGloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although not originally developed for the ornamental fish trade, it is one of the first genetically modified animals to become publicly available. These fluorescent fishes were developed with a gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein from a jellyfish. The gene was inserted into a zebrafish embryo, allowing it to integrate into the zebrafish's genome, which caused the fish to be brightly fluorescent under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405131

GloFish Zebrafish (Danio rerio), red and blue versions. Although

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Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. Brazil© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2393066

Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus,

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Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, jumping out of water. When jumping on land, the mangrove rivulus does a "tail flip", flipping its head over its body towards the tail end. The jumping technique gives it an ability to direct its jumps on land and to make relatively forceful jumps. It can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. Brazil© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393065

Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus,

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Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, on mangrove. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, on mangrove. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, on mangrove. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. Brazil© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393064

Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus,

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Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. BrazilMangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus. It lives in brackish, and marine waters (less frequently in fresh water) along the coasts of Florida, through the Antilles, and South America. The mangrove rivulus can spend up to 66 consecutive days out of water, which it typically spends inside fallen logs, breathing air through its skin. During this time, it alters its gills so it can retain water and nutrients, while nitrogen waste is excreted through the skin. The change is reversed once it re-enters the water. The mangrove rivulus is considered to have potential as a bioindicator species of estuary habitats. Brazil© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393063

Mangrove killifish or Mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus.

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Bags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaBags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaBags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2093019

Bags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the

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Bags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaBags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaBags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2093018

Bags for the sampling of bioindicated lichens. Study of the

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Collection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCollection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCollection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2093015

Collection of lichens which will then be analyzed as

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Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2093014

Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New

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Collection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCollection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCollection of lichens which will then be analyzed as bioindicators. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2093013

Collection of lichens which will then be analyzed as

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Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) notes the GPS positioning of the sampled lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) notes the GPS positioning of the sampled lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) notes the GPS positioning of the sampled lichens. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092965

Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New

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Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New CaledoniaCamille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New Caledonia) takes a lichen that will serve as a bio-indicator. Study of the impact of the exploitation of Nickel. North Province, New Caledonia© Anne Claire Monna / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2092964

Camille Pasquet (doctoral student at the University of New

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Highland Tamarin (Acacia heterophylla), Bamboo ((Nastus borbonicus) and Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata), Tevelave rorest, Hauts des Avirons, Hauts de l'Ouest, Reunion islandHighland Tamarin (Acacia heterophylla), Bamboo ((Nastus borbonicus) and Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata), Tevelave rorest, Hauts des Avirons, Hauts de l'Ouest, Reunion islandHighland Tamarin (Acacia heterophylla), Bamboo ((Nastus borbonicus) and Old Man's Beard (Usnea barbata), Tevelave rorest, Hauts des Avirons, Hauts de l'Ouest, Reunion island© Myriam Dupuis / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Highland Tamarin (Acacia heterophylla), Bamboo ((Nastus

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Caddis fly on a blade of grass - Picardie FranceCaddis fly on a blade of grass - Picardie FranceCaddis fly on a blade of grass - Picardie France© Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Caddis fly on a blade of grass - Picardie France

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Pyrenean brook salamander on bank - Ordesa SpainPyrenean brook salamander on bank - Ordesa SpainPyrenean brook salamander on bank - Ordesa Spain© Óscar Díez Martínez / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pyrenean brook salamander on bank - Ordesa Spain

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Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ; Lichen thallus strips formed on the needles of a spruce<br>Elevation: 1800 m Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes FranceLichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ; Lichen thallus strips formed on the needles of a spruce
Elevation: 1800 m
© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2012000

Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ;

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Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ; Lichen thallus strips formed on the needles of a spruce<br>Elevation: 1800 m Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes FranceLichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ; Lichen thallus strips formed on the needles of a spruce
Elevation: 1800 m
© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2011999

Lichen Pseudevernia on Spruce - Plan de Tuéda Alpes France ;

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Caddisfly molting on a leaf of Sedge - Picardy France ; Natural site of Marsh Genonville<br>Site protected by the Conservatoire de Picardie natural areas Caddisfly molting on a leaf of Sedge - Picardy FranceCaddisfly molting on a leaf of Sedge - Picardy France ; Natural site of Marsh Genonville
Site protected by the Conservatoire de Picardie natural areas
© Samuel Dhier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2009482

Caddisfly molting on a leaf of Sedge - Picardy France ; Natural

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Freshwater water fleas females with viviparous offspringFreshwater water fleas females with viviparous offspringFreshwater water fleas females with viviparous offspring© Roger Eritja / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

1988769

Freshwater water fleas females with viviparous offspring

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Larva Stonefly on pebble in the river Gervanne France  ; Polluo most-sensitive speciesLarva Stonefly on pebble in the river Gervanne France Larva Stonefly on pebble in the river Gervanne France ; Polluo most-sensitive species© Yannick Gouguenheim / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Larva Stonefly on pebble in the river Gervanne France ; Polluo

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Mossy undergrowth Bugey France Mossy undergrowth Bugey France Mossy undergrowth Bugey France © Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Mossy undergrowth Bugey France

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Path mossy undergrowth Bugey France Path mossy undergrowth Bugey France Path mossy undergrowth Bugey France © Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Path mossy undergrowth Bugey France

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Strain of zebra mussels in the Rhône France Strain of zebra mussels in the Rhône France Strain of zebra mussels in the Rhône France © Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Strain of zebra mussels in the Rhône France

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Pyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees SpainPyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees SpainPyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees Spain© Jorge Sierra / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Spain

1682994

Pyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees Spain

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Pyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees SpainPyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees SpainPyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees Spain© Jorge Sierra / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Spain

1682993

Pyrenean Brook Newt on rock Pyrenees Spain

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Portrait of Pyrenean Brook Newt Pyrenees SpainPortrait of Pyrenean Brook Newt Pyrenees SpainPortrait of Pyrenean Brook Newt Pyrenees Spain© Jorge Sierra / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Spain

1682992

Portrait of Pyrenean Brook Newt Pyrenees Spain

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Green oak covered with lichenes in the Dehesa Spain  ; The dehesa is a mediterranean forest ecosystem. Green oak covered with lichenes in the Dehesa Spain Green oak covered with lichenes in the Dehesa Spain  ; The dehesa is a mediterranean forest ecosystem. © Berndt Fischer / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Green oak covered with lichenes in the Dehesa Spain  ; The

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Dead tree icovered with moss in an holly oak forest France Dead tree icovered with moss in an holly oak forest France Dead tree icovered with moss in an holly oak forest France © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dead tree icovered with moss in an holly oak forest France 

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Pyrenean mountain newt. matingPyrenean mountain newt. matingPyrenean mountain newt. mating© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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1357511

Pyrenean mountain newt. mating

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Pyrenean mountain newt. matingPyrenean mountain newt. matingPyrenean mountain newt. mating© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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1357510

Pyrenean mountain newt. mating

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Pyrenean Desman on a rock Midi-Pyrenenes FrancePyrenean Desman on a rock Midi-Pyrenenes FrancePyrenean Desman on a rock Midi-Pyrenenes France© Daniel Heuclin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Japan
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Capitol Echinacea Dinan Brittany FranceCapitol Echinacea Dinan Brittany FranceCapitol Echinacea Dinan Brittany France© André Pascal / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dipper's nest in a cliff Pyrenees FranceDipper's nest in a cliff Pyrenees FranceDipper's nest in a cliff Pyrenees France© Pierre Cadiran / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Dipper feeding her young Pyrenees France Dipper feeding her young Pyrenees France Dipper feeding her young Pyrenees France © Pierre Cadiran / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Bullhead on the bottom of a river Pyrenees FranceBullhead on the bottom of a river Pyrenees FranceBullhead on the bottom of a river Pyrenees France© Pierre Cadiran / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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