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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, October© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2408306

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), Male during slab, Isle of Jura, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), Male during slab, Isle of Jura, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), Male during slab, Isle of Jura, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.© Joël Fischer / BiosphotoJPG - RMUse for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2140161

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), Male during slab, Isle of Jura, Outer

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) Red deer bellowing at sunrise, England, AutumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) Red deer bellowing at sunrise, England, AutumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) Red deer bellowing at sunrise, England, Autumn© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2089134

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) Red deer bellowing at sunrise, England,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) walking in the fog against the light at dawn, Ardennes, BelgiumRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) walking in the fog against the light at dawn, Ardennes, BelgiumRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) walking in the fog against the light at dawn, Ardennes, Belgium© Philippe Moës / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2087887

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) walking in the fog against the light at

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) slab, Ardennes , BelgiumRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) slab, Ardennes , BelgiumRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) slab, Ardennes , Belgium© Christian Cabron / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2069799

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) slab, Ardennes , Belgium

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during slabRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during slabRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during slab© Franck Fouquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2059208

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during slab

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Red Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UK© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2012050

Red Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UK

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Red Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UK© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2012049

Red Deer stag bellowing during rut - Richmond Park UK

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Red Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UK© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2012047

Red Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UK

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Red Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UKRed Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UK© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2012046

Red Deer stag during rut on a misty dawn - Richmond Park UK

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Male red deer with grass caught in its antlers Spain Male red deer with grass caught in its antlers Spain Male red deer with grass caught in its antlers Spain © Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

1464817

Male red deer with grass caught in its antlers Spain 

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Red deer & Hinds standing in the mist at sunrise in autumnRed deer & Hinds standing in the mist at sunrise in autumnRed deer & Hinds standing in the mist at sunrise in autumn© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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1460907

Red deer & Hinds standing in the mist at sunrise in autumn

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Silhouette of Red Deer stag calling at dawn in autumn UKSilhouette of Red Deer stag calling at dawn in autumn UKSilhouette of Red Deer stag calling at dawn in autumn UK© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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1250554

Silhouette of Red Deer stag calling at dawn in autumn UK

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Red Deer stag roaring under sunlight Denmark ; Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2010<br>Animals in their Environment - Highly Commended<br>"Dawn call"Red Deer stag roaring under sunlight DenmarkRed Deer stag roaring under sunlight Denmark ; Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2010
Animals in their Environment - Highly Commended
"Dawn call"
© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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911512

Red Deer stag roaring under sunlight Denmark ; Wildlife

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Stag Red deer & two hinds in frozen meadow Great BritainStag Red deer & two hinds in frozen meadow Great BritainStag Red deer & two hinds in frozen meadow Great Britain© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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745726

Stag Red deer & two hinds in frozen meadow Great Britain

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Male Red deer troating Great BritainMale Red deer troating Great BritainMale Red deer troating Great Britain© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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732189

Male Red deer troating Great Britain

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus), roaring deer during rutting season, snowfall, Upper Austria, Austria, EuropeRed deer (Cervus elaphus), roaring deer during rutting season, snowfall, Upper Austria, Austria, EuropeRed deer (Cervus elaphus), roaring deer during rutting season, snowfall, Upper Austria, Austria, Europe© Heinz Hudelist / imageBROKER / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2173467

Red deer (Cervus elaphus), roaring deer during rutting season,

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433538

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433537

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumn

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433536

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male scratching the ground during rut in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male scratching the ground during rut in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male scratching the ground during rut in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433535

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male scratching the ground during rut

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433531

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in a clearing in autumn

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433528

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a wet meadow in autumn

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing and hinds resting in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing and hinds resting in a clearing in autumnRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing and hinds resting in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433527

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing and hinds resting in a

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433526

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433525

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in a clearing in autumn

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumnRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the antlers in a clearing in autumn© Emile Barbelette / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433515

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing with ferns on the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in a clearing, SlovakiaRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in a clearing, SlovakiaRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in a clearing, Slovakia© Ervin Horesnyík / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2433323

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in a clearing, Slovakia

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Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Buck bellows in the early morning in the Peak District National Park, UK.Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Buck bellows in the early morning in the Peak District National Park, UK.Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Buck bellows in the early morning in the Peak District National Park, UK.© Tesni Ward / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2426951

Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Buck bellows in the early morning in the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). A Red Deer bellows during the rut in the Peak District National Park, UK.Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). A Red Deer bellows during the rut in the Peak District National Park, UK.Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). A Red Deer bellows during the rut in the Peak District National Park, UK.© Tesni Ward / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2425313

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus). A Red Deer bellows during the rut in

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422589

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422588

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422587

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing and hinds,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422586

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422582

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France© François Mordel / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2422580

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), male deer bellowing, Normandy, France

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male during the rut against the light, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male during the rut against the light, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male during the rut against the light, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2420903

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male during the rut against the light,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the Dolomites, Dolomites Massif, Tyrol, ItalyRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the Dolomites, Dolomites Massif, Tyrol, ItalyRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the Dolomites, Dolomites Massif, Tyrol, Italy© Jean-Philippe Delobelle / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2416082

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the Dolomites, Dolomites

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415916

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn,

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415915

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn,

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415914

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn,

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn, Sologne, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2415913

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male rutting in clearing at dawn,

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, England© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414757

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, England

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, EnglandRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, EnglandRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, England© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414755

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, England

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, EngalndRed deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, EngalndRed deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, Engalnd© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414754

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) bellowing in the mist, Engalnd

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing amongst Bracken, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing amongst Bracken, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing amongst Bracken, England© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414749

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing amongst Bracken, England

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, EnglandRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, England© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414746

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag bellowing in the rain, England

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag standing in the rain, EngalndRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag standing in the rain, EngalndRed deer (Cervus elaphus) stag standing in the rain, Engalnd© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2414745

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) stag standing in the rain, Engalnd

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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the forest of Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the forest of Sologne, FranceRed deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the forest of Sologne, France© Cyril Doche / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2414450

Red deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the forest of Sologne, France

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park, London, October© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2408310

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park, London,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park London OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park London OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park London October© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2408309

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut Richmond Park London

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, October© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2408308

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, OctoberRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London, October© David Tipling / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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2408304

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) stag during rut, Richmond Park, London,

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408007

Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Red deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, EuropeRed deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, EuropeRed deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2407730

Red deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest,

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Red deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, EuropeRed deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, EuropeRed deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest, Mediterranean forest, Sierra de San Pedro, Cáceres, Extremadura, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2407729

Red deer(Cervus elaphus), Rutting period, Cork oak forest,

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Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter, France© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2407440

Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter, France

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Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, France© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2407439

Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at

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Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, FranceRed Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at night, France© Pierre Huguet-Dubief / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2407438

Red Deer (Deer Elaphus), male and female during slaughter at

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406269

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406268

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406267

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406265

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male and his hind herd during the

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406264

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period, Haute-Saône, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2406263

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) during the slaughter period,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2405291

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2405290

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405289

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male in the undergrowth, Boutissaint

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2405288

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405287

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405286

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405285

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, FranceRed Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth, Boutissaint Forest, Yonne, Burgundy, France© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
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2405284

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) male bellowing in the undergrowth,

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Zebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. PortugalZebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular stripes bellow. Since the 1930s, zebra fish have been a model organism for studying human diseases. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405139

Zebrafish, Danio rerio. Veil fin variety above and regular

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Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USAZebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form (bellow). Casper fish are the result of a cross between 2 mutant zebra fish. Since 1930 zebra fish are used to study the development of cancer in vivo. The fertilized eggs, embryos, and fry are transparent, allowing scientists to easily observe and study topics such as tumor growth, brain tissue development, and blood vessel growth. However, after a few weeks, transparency declines as their bodies become opaque, limiting the research window for scientists. In response, researchers began crossbreeding specific genetic strains of zebra fish to produce a transparent fish. After a year, they developed the "Casper Fish", which lacks pigment in its skin and scales, and therefore is transparent. The Casper Fish’s transparency allowed researchers to extend their research into the adult stage of this model organism. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2405134

Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Stripe form (above) Casper fish form

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Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405054

Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark

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Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405053

Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark

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Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405052

Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark

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Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, DenmarkRed Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark© Pierre Vernay / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France
Use for the promotion of hunting prohibited

2405051

Red Deer (Cervus elephus), slab, Dyrehaven, Denmark

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