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The Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years ago. Ownership of the trees bearing the hives predates land ownership and it is passed down by inheritance. So, on the land of Oïta’s concession, there is a tree holding a hive but Oïta owns neither one nor the other and in no case can he cut this tree down without the hive owner’s permission. Karo people, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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The Banas were beekeepers well before becoming farmers ten years

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To try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. FranceTo try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. FranceTo try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the bees fight back by forming a cluster on the flight board. They thus save a few foraging bees returning after gathering nectar and pollen from the flowers. France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103602

To try to defend the colony from this incessant predation, the

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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's activity is intense when the temperature rises above 15° Celsius and when the flowers produce an abundance of nectar. The nectar is secreted by the flowers to attract the insects who thus ensure the flowers' reproduction by transporting the pollen from the pistils to the stamens.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103598

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - Children of the sun, a hive's

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during a massive return to the hive. A bee transports 20 to 30 milligrams of nectar and carries out 3 to 10 flights per day during 10 to 20 days of activity. A hive has between 100,000 and 200,000 foraging bees and thus harvests between 60 kilos and 300 kilos of honey per year.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103493

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - The coming and going of bees during

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103468

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel

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Honey bee landing about to land in its hiveHoney bee landing about to land in its hiveHoney bee landing about to land in its hive© Laurent Geslin / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in UK
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739764

Honey bee landing about to land in its hive

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Hives at the forest edge in summer, Moselle, FranceHives at the forest edge in summer, Moselle, FranceHives at the forest edge in summer, Moselle, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Hives at the forest edge in summer, Moselle, France

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Beehives in a private garden in the spring, Moselle, FranceBeehives in a private garden in the spring, Moselle, FranceBeehives in a private garden in the spring, Moselle, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beehives in a private garden in the spring, Moselle, France

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Smoker on a hiveSmoker on a hiveSmoker on a hive© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Smoker on a hive

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frame© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees on a hive frame

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Maintenance of an apiary, Inspection of rays and smoke to calm the bees, autumn, Finistère, FranceMaintenance of an apiary, Inspection of rays and smoke to calm the bees, autumn, Finistère, FranceMaintenance of an apiary, Inspection of rays and smoke to calm the bees, autumn, Finistère, France© Jean Mayet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Maintenance of an apiary, Inspection of rays and smoke to calm

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Hives, Abbey and Gardens of Valloires in spring, Argoules, Somme, Picardy, Hauts-de-France, France.Hives, Abbey and Gardens of Valloires in spring, Argoules, Somme, Picardy, Hauts-de-France, France.Hives, Abbey and Gardens of Valloires in spring, Argoules, Somme, Picardy, Hauts-de-France, France.© Stéphane Bouilland / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Hives, Abbey and Gardens of Valloires in spring, Argoules, Somme,

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Beehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, FranceBeehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, FranceBeehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie,

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Beehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, FranceBeehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, FranceBeehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie, Provence, France© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beehives in front of a lavender field in Moustiers-Sainte-Marie,

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Beekeeping, apiary in town, Dijon honey, botanical garden, Science Garden, Arquebuse Park, Dijon, Cote d Or, FranceBeekeeping, apiary in town, Dijon honey, botanical garden, Science Garden, Arquebuse Park, Dijon, Cote d Or, FranceBeekeeping, apiary in town, Dijon honey, botanical garden, Science Garden, Arquebuse Park, Dijon, Cote d Or, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeping, apiary in town, Dijon honey, botanical garden,

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive,

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, FranceWarré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive, Doubs (25), Franche-Comté, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Warré beehives, bees in flight at the entrance to the hive,

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica), Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica), Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica), Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica), Saudi Arabia

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi ArabiaHive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia tree, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

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Hive of Yemeni honey bee (Apis melifera jemenitica) in acacia

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Merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaMerchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaMerchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150953

Merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

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Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaYemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150951

Yemeni merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Saudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaSaudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi ArabiaSaudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

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Saudi merchant showing his honey, Taif souq, Saudi Arabia

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Traditionnal hives, Saudi ArabiaTraditionnal hives, Saudi ArabiaTraditionnal hives, Saudi Arabia© Olivier Couppey / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited in Saudi Arabia

2150949

Traditionnal hives, Saudi Arabia

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Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' (rudbeckie hérissée)© Frédéric Didillon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Apis mellifera (abeille à miel). Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer'

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The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126385

The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made

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The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126383

The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126376

The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, MexicoKillers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, MexicoKillers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, Mexico© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126355

Killers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126354

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126353

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126352

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126351

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126350

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126349

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker.

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126348

Killers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126347

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work,

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126346

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126345

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126344

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126343

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126342

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126341

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126340

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126339

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126338

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126337

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126336

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126335

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126334

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126333

Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126332

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126331

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126330

Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the

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The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126326

The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased

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Combs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, FranceCombs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, FranceCombs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, France© Dominique Delfino / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2118489

Combs of bees hanging from a tree branch, Nommay, Doubs, France

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In the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the air of a sacrificial ceremony. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105422

In the middle of the night, the harvesting of a hive takes on the

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Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105421

Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia

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In an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a golden wheat-colored honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105420

In an acacia tree where four hives are set up, they harvest a

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A child passes through the camp's fence where a hive is waiting to be installed. The tribe of nomad herders, the Hamer, numbers 40,000 people. Still very traditional, they live mainly from pastoralism. The Hamer people live in a desert region with sparse vegetation. The hives are set up near streams, which fill up during the wet season. The development of the Omo Valley, with projects for intensive farming and road infrastructures, will certainly and rapidly transform the life of these people. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA child passes through the camp's fence where a hive is waiting to be installed. The tribe of nomad herders, the Hamer, numbers 40,000 people. Still very traditional, they live mainly from pastoralism. The Hamer people live in a desert region with sparse vegetation. The hives are set up near streams, which fill up during the wet season. The development of the Omo Valley, with projects for intensive farming and road infrastructures, will certainly and rapidly transform the life of these people. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA child passes through the camp's fence where a hive is waiting to be installed. The tribe of nomad herders, the Hamer, numbers 40,000 people. Still very traditional, they live mainly from pastoralism. The Hamer people live in a desert region with sparse vegetation. The hives are set up near streams, which fill up during the wet season. The development of the Omo Valley, with projects for intensive farming and road infrastructures, will certainly and rapidly transform the life of these people. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105417

A child passes through the camp's fence where a hive is waiting

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A harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaA harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of the Mago National Park creates a problem. The Banas install their hives in the park but their expeditions into the brush are accompanied by hunting… We understand the rapid disappearance of the wildlife starting in the 1980s with the arrival of automatic guns in the region. Poachers hunting the ivory have decimated the herds of elephants and potential predators of the goat herds are systematically hunted and killed. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105416

A harvest in an acacia tree above a cornfield. The proximity of

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Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105413

Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe,

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At the Hamer camp of Dembaiti, Ivo Aikké, a giant over 2 meters tall, transports a hive. The Hamers live very scattered on their territory and are not at all very dependent on tourism. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaAt the Hamer camp of Dembaiti, Ivo Aikké, a giant over 2 meters tall, transports a hive. The Hamers live very scattered on their territory and are not at all very dependent on tourism. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaAt the Hamer camp of Dembaiti, Ivo Aikké, a giant over 2 meters tall, transports a hive. The Hamers live very scattered on their territory and are not at all very dependent on tourism. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105408

At the Hamer camp of Dembaiti, Ivo Aikké, a giant over 2 meters

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Mr. Waracha Shisha, 60 years old, of the Maale ethnic group, lives with his family from the 1.5 hectares of land that he owns on his concession where his hive-house can be found. He also raises cows and goats. Most of the Maales converted to Christianity with the arrival of Protestant missionaries and have abandoned their traditional garments. The village elder recounts that there are fewer and fewer big trees for setting up the hives and that the flowering trees are disappearing, giving way to corn and sorghum crops. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaMr. Waracha Shisha, 60 years old, of the Maale ethnic group, lives with his family from the 1.5 hectares of land that he owns on his concession where his hive-house can be found. He also raises cows and goats. Most of the Maales converted to Christianity with the arrival of Protestant missionaries and have abandoned their traditional garments. The village elder recounts that there are fewer and fewer big trees for setting up the hives and that the flowering trees are disappearing, giving way to corn and sorghum crops. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaMr. Waracha Shisha, 60 years old, of the Maale ethnic group, lives with his family from the 1.5 hectares of land that he owns on his concession where his hive-house can be found. He also raises cows and goats. Most of the Maales converted to Christianity with the arrival of Protestant missionaries and have abandoned their traditional garments. The village elder recounts that there are fewer and fewer big trees for setting up the hives and that the flowering trees are disappearing, giving way to corn and sorghum crops. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105404

Mr. Waracha Shisha, 60 years old, of the Maale ethnic group,

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In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105401

In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey

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In the land of the Bana tribe, a beekeeper inspects a hive when the colony is full at work and there are fewer bees inside it. African bees are known for their aggressiveness. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, a beekeeper inspects a hive when the colony is full at work and there are fewer bees inside it. African bees are known for their aggressiveness. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, a beekeeper inspects a hive when the colony is full at work and there are fewer bees inside it. African bees are known for their aggressiveness. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105400

In the land of the Bana tribe, a beekeeper inspects a hive when

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At night, a member of the Maale tribe inspects his apiary-house with the flame from a smoker. He says proudly that he has had one colony for 14 years now and another since 8 years ago. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaAt night, a member of the Maale tribe inspects his apiary-house with the flame from a smoker. He says proudly that he has had one colony for 14 years now and another since 8 years ago. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaAt night, a member of the Maale tribe inspects his apiary-house with the flame from a smoker. He says proudly that he has had one colony for 14 years now and another since 8 years ago. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105399

At night, a member of the Maale tribe inspects his apiary-house

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In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaIn the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey in the middle of the day, unlike the other tribes in the valley, covering their bodies with a repelling plant or clay. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105398

In the land of the Bana tribe, the beekeepers harvest the honey

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The village of Korcho on the Omo River, a Karo beekeeper gets ready for the harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe village of Korcho on the Omo River, a Karo beekeeper gets ready for the harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaThe village of Korcho on the Omo River, a Karo beekeeper gets ready for the harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105397

The village of Korcho on the Omo River, a Karo beekeeper gets

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Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless beesRaphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece of brood before carrying out pathological analyses. The Centre of Investigation in to Tropical Apiculture (CINAT) of Costa Rica also develops communications with the general public about the stingless bee, trains beekeepers and proposes analyses of honey and bees at minimum cost to the beekeepers. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105384

Raphael Calderon in the laboratory of the Cinat studies a piece

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The Apis Laboriosa, giant bee of the Himalayas, builds its nests under the overhanging rock of cliff faces, near a river. The combs can reach five feet in diameter. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingThe Apis Laboriosa, giant bee of the Himalayas, builds its nests under the overhanging rock of cliff faces, near a river. The combs can reach five feet in diameter. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingThe Apis Laboriosa, giant bee of the Himalayas, builds its nests under the overhanging rock of cliff faces, near a river. The combs can reach five feet in diameter. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey hunting© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105344

The Apis Laboriosa, giant bee of the Himalayas, builds its nests

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The fire is lit, setting off a massive attack by the swarms. Bolo Kesher chants an ancient prayer, one passed down from generation to generation, to the guardian spirit of the cliff. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingThe fire is lit, setting off a massive attack by the swarms. Bolo Kesher chants an ancient prayer, one passed down from generation to generation, to the guardian spirit of the cliff. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingThe fire is lit, setting off a massive attack by the swarms. Bolo Kesher chants an ancient prayer, one passed down from generation to generation, to the guardian spirit of the cliff. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey hunting© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105343

The fire is lit, setting off a massive attack by the swarms. Bolo

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Giorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Joan Evangelista Moteiro, 57 years old, in the region of Abaetetuba. Joan is a peasant. For a long time, forestry was indispensable to his life in the forest, but today, with his acai plantation producing that fruit and heart of palm, shrimp fishing and keeping of the stingless bees, he succeeds in providing a living for his family.. Stingless bees of the AmazonGiorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Joan Evangelista Moteiro, 57 years old, in the region of Abaetetuba. Joan is a peasant. For a long time, forestry was indispensable to his life in the forest, but today, with his acai plantation producing that fruit and heart of palm, shrimp fishing and keeping of the stingless bees, he succeeds in providing a living for his family.. Stingless bees of the AmazonGiorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Joan Evangelista Moteiro, 57 years old, in the region of Abaetetuba. Joan is a peasant. For a long time, forestry was indispensable to his life in the forest, but today, with his acai plantation producing that fruit and heart of palm, shrimp fishing and keeping of the stingless bees, he succeeds in providing a living for his family.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105331

Giorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Joan Evangelista

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Brazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105325

Brazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The

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Brazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The system of hives put in place by Embrapa'a program permits the bees to store the nectar in an easy to harvest part of the hive. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105324

Brazil, State of Para. Giorgio Venturieri harvesting a hive. The

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The very small Trigona fulviventris bees are flying around the entrance to their hive to protect it. These stingless bees have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. Stingless bees of the AmazonThe very small Trigona fulviventris bees are flying around the entrance to their hive to protect it. These stingless bees have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. Stingless bees of the AmazonThe very small Trigona fulviventris bees are flying around the entrance to their hive to protect it. These stingless bees have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105323

The very small Trigona fulviventris bees are flying around the

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Brazil, State of Para, Belém, at the Embrapa station. The coming-and-going at the entrance to an experimental hive of Melipona seminigra pernigra bees. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Belém, at the Embrapa station. The coming-and-going at the entrance to an experimental hive of Melipona seminigra pernigra bees. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Belém, at the Embrapa station. The coming-and-going at the entrance to an experimental hive of Melipona seminigra pernigra bees. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105322

Brazil, State of Para, Belém, at the Embrapa station. The

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Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. A shop selling honey along the national route attests to the importance of beekeeping in this region of replanted forests.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. A shop selling honey along the national route attests to the importance of beekeeping in this region of replanted forests.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. A shop selling honey along the national route attests to the importance of beekeeping in this region of replanted forests.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105321

Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. A shop selling honey along

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At the entrance to their hive, three Melipona flavolineata bees guard the platform that the colony built out of propolis.. Stingless bees of the AmazonAt the entrance to their hive, three Melipona flavolineata bees guard the platform that the colony built out of propolis.. Stingless bees of the AmazonAt the entrance to their hive, three Melipona flavolineata bees guard the platform that the colony built out of propolis.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105319

At the entrance to their hive, three Melipona flavolineata bees

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Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. Giorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Vilena Fernandes da Silva, a farmer who also grows acai, cashews, lemons, coconuts, coffee, mangoes and other fruits and nuts.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. Giorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Vilena Fernandes da Silva, a farmer who also grows acai, cashews, lemons, coconuts, coffee, mangoes and other fruits and nuts.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. Giorgio Venturieri at the apiary belonging to Vilena Fernandes da Silva, a farmer who also grows acai, cashews, lemons, coconuts, coffee, mangoes and other fruits and nuts.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105318

Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. Giorgio Venturieri at the

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Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. The association Flores da Amazonia, which brings together 60 beekeepers, has also thrown itself into the raising of stingless bees. Giorgio Venturieri is in the apiary belonging to Marron, the owner of the association's lands. Former banker, he took advantage of a restructuring to buy land and share 25 hectares with the association and local beekeepers. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. The association Flores da Amazonia, which brings together 60 beekeepers, has also thrown itself into the raising of stingless bees. Giorgio Venturieri is in the apiary belonging to Marron, the owner of the association's lands. Former banker, he took advantage of a restructuring to buy land and share 25 hectares with the association and local beekeepers. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. The association Flores da Amazonia, which brings together 60 beekeepers, has also thrown itself into the raising of stingless bees. Giorgio Venturieri is in the apiary belonging to Marron, the owner of the association's lands. Former banker, he took advantage of a restructuring to buy land and share 25 hectares with the association and local beekeepers. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105316

Brazil, State of Para, Piétropolis. The association Flores da

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Melipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the AmazonMelipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the AmazonMelipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105315

Melipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax

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Melipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the AmazonMelipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the AmazonMelipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax pockets. For five years, Giorgio Venturieri program has included twenty-odd beekeeping farmers who own 20 to 300 hives of this type. "Since 2001, I have given loads of classes and lectures in the towns and cities of Para. Nearly 400 beekeepers have followed my courses". Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105314

Melipona flavolineata bees on their honey supply stored in wax

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Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old, a beekeeping farmer who keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees, with his son in front of his concession.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old, a beekeeping farmer who keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees, with his son in front of his concession.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old, a beekeeping farmer who keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees, with his son in front of his concession.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105313

Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old, a

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Brazil, Bragança, State of Para. Professor Giorgio Venturieri has created a small-sized hive based on the hives of Western honeybees. Now it is possible for the farmers to divide the colonies to increase their stock and also to harvest nearly 4 kilos of honey a year without destroying the bees.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, Bragança, State of Para. Professor Giorgio Venturieri has created a small-sized hive based on the hives of Western honeybees. Now it is possible for the farmers to divide the colonies to increase their stock and also to harvest nearly 4 kilos of honey a year without destroying the bees.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, Bragança, State of Para. Professor Giorgio Venturieri has created a small-sized hive based on the hives of Western honeybees. Now it is possible for the farmers to divide the colonies to increase their stock and also to harvest nearly 4 kilos of honey a year without destroying the bees.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105312

Brazil, Bragança, State of Para. Professor Giorgio Venturieri

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Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, with Professor Giorgio Venturieri harvesting together the honey from a hive.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, with Professor Giorgio Venturieri harvesting together the honey from a hive.. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, with Professor Giorgio Venturieri harvesting together the honey from a hive.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105311

Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old

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Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees with the help of Professor Giorgio Venturieri who monitors the upkeep of this model apiary. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees with the help of Professor Giorgio Venturieri who monitors the upkeep of this model apiary. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old and a beekeeping farmer, keeps twenty-odd hives of Melipona fasciculate bees with the help of Professor Giorgio Venturieri who monitors the upkeep of this model apiary. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105310

Brazil, State of Para, near Bragança. Mr. Roque, 68 years old

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Giorgio Venturieri in front of an open hive of Trigona fulviventris bees, which have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. "I put in place a system of hives that allows for the colonies' easy division, to multiply the hives and carry out several honey harvests.". Stingless bees of the AmazonGiorgio Venturieri in front of an open hive of Trigona fulviventris bees, which have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. "I put in place a system of hives that allows for the colonies' easy division, to multiply the hives and carry out several honey harvests.". Stingless bees of the AmazonGiorgio Venturieri in front of an open hive of Trigona fulviventris bees, which have the particularity of keeping on their back legs little balls of resin to protect them from ant attacks. "I put in place a system of hives that allows for the colonies' easy division, to multiply the hives and carry out several honey harvests.". Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105309

Giorgio Venturieri in front of an open hive of Trigona

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Brazil, on the Rio Para channel of the Amazon Delta, Professor Giorgio Venturieri brings the mini-hives of his design to different apiaries in a 150 km radius around Belém. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, on the Rio Para channel of the Amazon Delta, Professor Giorgio Venturieri brings the mini-hives of his design to different apiaries in a 150 km radius around Belém. Stingless bees of the AmazonBrazil, on the Rio Para channel of the Amazon Delta, Professor Giorgio Venturieri brings the mini-hives of his design to different apiaries in a 150 km radius around Belém. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105305

Brazil, on the Rio Para channel of the Amazon Delta, Professor

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At the entrance to the hive, a melipone bee, Melipona flavolineata, guards its nest.. Stingless bees of the AmazonAt the entrance to the hive, a melipone bee, Melipona flavolineata, guards its nest.. Stingless bees of the AmazonAt the entrance to the hive, a melipone bee, Melipona flavolineata, guards its nest.. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105303

At the entrance to the hive, a melipone bee, Melipona

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