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Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) on a branch, Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) on a branch, Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) on a branch, Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) on a branch, Pantanal, Mato Grosso

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Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.© Sergio Pitamitz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul,

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Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) with chick, Schleswig-Holstein, GermanyNorthern Gannet (Morus bassanus) with chick, Schleswig-Holstein, GermanyNorthern Gannet (Morus bassanus) with chick, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany© Janine Brauneis / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) with chick, Schleswig-Holstein,

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Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) feeding chick, Schleswig-Holstein, GermanyNorthern Gannet (Morus bassanus) feeding chick, Schleswig-Holstein, GermanyNorthern Gannet (Morus bassanus) feeding chick, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany© Janine Brauneis / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) feeding chick,

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Western Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, IsraelWestern Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, IsraelWestern Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, Israel© Avi Meir / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Western Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, Israel

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Western Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, IsraelWestern Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, IsraelWestern Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, Israel© Avi Meir / BIA / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Western Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) eating a fish, Eilat, Israel

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African oystercatcher or African black oystercatcher (Haematopus moquini), Western Cape. South AfricaAfrican oystercatcher or African black oystercatcher (Haematopus moquini), Western Cape. South AfricaAfrican oystercatcher or African black oystercatcher (Haematopus moquini), Western Cape. South Africa© Roger de La Harpe / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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African oystercatcher or African black oystercatcher (Haematopus

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A Velociraptor mongoliensis attacks a Protoceratops andrewsi.

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Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.© Yuriy Priymak / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Velociraptors chase a Bagaceratops in a prehistoric desert.

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Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long needle-like teeth, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Early Cretaceous China about 125 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zhenyuanopterus is the genus of a moderately large pterosaur with

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Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid pterosaur with a wingspan of about 12 feet and weight of about 50 pounds. Known for its long neck and lack of a long protruding head keel typical of other pterosaurs, this flying reptile soared in the skies of Late Cretaceous China about 81 million years ago and likely fed upon fish.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Zhejiangopterus is the genus of a moderately large azhdarchid

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A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the genus Styracosaurus samples flowers of the order Ericales amidst varieties of fern 76 million years ago in North America. Flanking the Styracosaurus are willows of the genus Salix.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A 17-foot-long, three ton herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur of the

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Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago in what is today the western United States. Looking on are a pair of Camelops, true camels that resembled the slightly smaller Arabian camels of today. Pleistocene Black Vultures were very similar to today's American Black Vultures with the exception that they were 10-15% larger and had a relatively flatter and wider bill.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Pleistocene Black Vultures feed on carrion two million years ago

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A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 90 million years ago in what is today New Mexico. . . Like the better known and larger Triceratops, Zuniceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A 10 foot long, 250 pound Zuniceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Zuniceratops is 3 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 250 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Zuniceratops from 90 million years ago is compared to a

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An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Triceratops is nearly 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 25,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Triceratops from 68 million years ago is compared to a

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A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river bordered by ferns and Bald Cypress in what is today southeastern Wyoming. Torosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur from the same family as the better known Triceratops. Torosaurus had one of the largest skulls of any known land animal, reaching over 8 feet in length.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A five ton, 25 foot long male Torosaurus drinks from a river

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An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Pentaceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 13,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Pentaceratops from 75 million years ago is compared to a

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Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. 
Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant Oak tree 75 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. The ground birds on the right are from the predatory genus Avisaurus. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Nedoceratops (formerly known as Diceratops) graze beneath a giant

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A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Wyoming. Nedoceratops had two prominent horns above its eyes and a single bump above its nose. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Nedoceratops was a Ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A two ton, 15 foot long Nedoceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest

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An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Nedoceratops is a little over 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 12,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Nedoceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a

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A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later.
A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is today the Two Medicine Formation in northwestern Montana. In the distance a long-dormant volcano signals its return to activity by cauterizing snowcover into great clouds of steam. Within weeks the volcano will bury this scene beneath a massive ash fall, preserving the remains of the flora and fauna for future exhumation and examination by Homo sapiens 75 million years later. © Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A herd of plant-eating Einiosaurus roam the plains in what is

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An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Einiosaurus is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 8,000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Einiosaurus from 77 million years ago is compared to a

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A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from Early-Jurassic England 195 million years ago. In the background is the ancient Tethys Ocean. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here an adult male has been given a colorful head inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Its head and beak combined were about 9 inches long.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A close-up of a colorful large-billed Dimorphodon from

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Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys Ocean 195 million years ago in what it is today England. While Dimorphodon's coloration is unknown, here the adult males have been given colorful heads inspired by modern day puffins and toucans. . . Dimorphodon was a medium-sized pterosaur (flying reptile) with a wingspan of about four feet and a large head and puffin-like beak. Its long front teeth suggest that it was built for plucking fish from near the surface of the water. Dimorphodon also had a long tail, the end of which is speculated to have sported a soft tissue vane for enhanced stability during flight.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479026

Winged Dimorphodon pluck fish from the Early-Jurassic Tethys

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A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 70 million years ago in what is today Utah. . Like the better known Triceratops, Diabloceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A one ton, 20 foot long Diabloceratops wanders a Cretaceous

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An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Diabloceratops is 8 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 6000 pounds, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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An adult Diabloceratops from 70 million years ago is compared to

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A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million years ago in what is today the Western United States.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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A ten ton Triceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 68 million

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A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today southeastern Wyoming. . Like the better known Triceratops, Torosaurus was a ceratopsid, a family of large four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479013

2479013

A colorful Torosaurus wanders a Cretaceous forest 75 million

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A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest 75 million years ago in what is today the southwestern United States. . Like the better known Triceratops, Pentaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479012

2479012

A six ton, 27 foot long Pentaceratops wonders a Cretaceous forest

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A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77 million years ago in what is today Alberta, Canada. . . Like the better known Triceratops, Albertaceratops was a Ceratopsid, a large four-legged plant-eating dinosaur characterized by beaks, rows of shearing teeth in the back of the jaw, and elaborate horns and frills. While they resemble defensive shields, the frills are in fact relatively fragile, suggesting that they may have served a purpose other than protecting against a brute force attack. One possibility is that the frills were employed as visual displays in order to intimidate rivals and attract the opposite sex. While no color pigmentation has been preserved in the fossil remains of Ceratopsids, it's not unreasonable to suggest that they may have been very colorful, like many reptiles and birds are today.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479011

2479011

A 20 foot long Albertaceratops wanders a Cretaceous forest 77

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An adult Albertaceratops from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Albertaceratops is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder (weight unknown), while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Albertaceratops from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Albertaceratops is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder (weight unknown), while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.An adult Albertaceratops from 77 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Albertaceratops is 6 and a half feet tall at the shoulder (weight unknown), while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7,000 pounds.© Walter Myers / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2479006

2479006

An adult Albertaceratops from 77 million years ago is compared to

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Coahuilaceratops walking through a Cretaceous sunset.Coahuilaceratops walking through a Cretaceous sunset.Coahuilaceratops walking through a Cretaceous sunset.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478946

2478946

Coahuilaceratops walking through a Cretaceous sunset.

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Citipati, a Mongolian oviraptorid from the Cretaceous Period.Citipati, a Mongolian oviraptorid from the Cretaceous Period.Citipati, a Mongolian oviraptorid from the Cretaceous Period.© Vitor Silva / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478945

2478945

Citipati, a Mongolian oviraptorid from the Cretaceous Period.

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Watercolor portrait of Ajancingenia yanshini. Ajancingenia yanshini was oviraptorid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. 
Watercolor portrait of Ajancingenia yanshini. Ajancingenia yanshini was oviraptorid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Watercolor portrait of Ajancingenia yanshini. Ajancingenia yanshini was oviraptorid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. © Vladimir Nikolov / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478920

2478920

Watercolor portrait of Ajancingenia yanshini. Ajancingenia

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3D rendering of Triceratops on white background.3D rendering of Triceratops on white background.3D rendering of Triceratops on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478891

2478891

3D rendering of Triceratops on white background.

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3D rendering of Triceratops with skeleton in ghost effect, on black background.3D rendering of Triceratops with skeleton in ghost effect, on black background.3D rendering of Triceratops with skeleton in ghost effect, on black background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478883

2478883

3D rendering of Triceratops with skeleton in ghost effect, on

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3D rendering of a Triceratops, side view on white background.3D rendering of a Triceratops, side view on white background.3D rendering of a Triceratops, side view on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478882

2478882

3D rendering of a Triceratops, side view on white background.

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Triceratops morphing from skin to skeleton, isolated on white backgroundTriceratops morphing from skin to skeleton, isolated on white backgroundTriceratops morphing from skin to skeleton, isolated on white background© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478879

2478879

Triceratops morphing from skin to skeleton, isolated on white

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3D rendering of a Triceratops on white background.3D rendering of a Triceratops on white background.3D rendering of a Triceratops on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478878

2478878

3D rendering of a Triceratops on white background.

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Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478870

2478870

Archaeopteryx dinosaur isolated on white background with dropped

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Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478867

2478867

Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.

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Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478866

2478866

Duck-billed platypus on white background with drop shadow.

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Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478861

2478861

Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.

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Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478860

2478860

Eudimorphodon flying prehistoric reptile, white background.

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Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478857

2478857

Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.

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Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478855

2478855

Maiasaura dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.

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Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478837

2478837

Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background with drop shadow.

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Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background.Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background.Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background.© Leonello Calvetti / Stocktrek Images / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2478836

2478836

Dorygnathus flying dinosaur on white background.

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