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Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) walking in a meadow near Christmas lightsRed fox (Vulpes vulpes) walking in a meadow near Christmas lightsRed fox (Vulpes vulpes) walking in a meadow near Christmas lights© Frédéric Desmette / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2447214

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) walking in a meadow near Christmas lights

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Spanish moon moth (Actias isabellae) on a pine branch in front of the lights of a village in the Sierra de Albarracin, Aragon, SpainSpanish moon moth (Actias isabellae) on a pine branch in front of the lights of a village in the Sierra de Albarracin, Aragon, SpainSpanish moon moth (Actias isabellae) on a pine branch in front of the lights of a village in the Sierra de Albarracin, Aragon, Spain© Pedro Javier Pascual Hernandez / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Spanish moon moth (Actias isabellae) on a pine branch in front of

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Fireworks over the Mont Saint-Michel - FranceFireworks over the Mont Saint-Michel - FranceFireworks over the Mont Saint-Michel - France© Vincent M. & E. Studler / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by Agents

2016991

Fireworks over the Mont Saint-Michel - France

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Mouse-eared Bat flying in front of the village of SisteronMouse-eared Bat flying in front of the village of SisteronMouse-eared Bat flying in front of the village of Sisteron© Tanguy Stoecklé / BiosphotoJPG - RM

259042

Mouse-eared Bat flying in front of the village of Sisteron

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Digue de Wissant au crépuscule, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts de France, France.Digue de Wissant au crépuscule, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts de France, France.Digue de Wissant au crépuscule, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts de France, France.© Yann Avril / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Digue de Wissant au crépuscule, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts de France,

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Night storm over the Ardèche, Donzère, Drôme, FranceNight storm over the Ardèche, Donzère, Drôme, FranceNight storm over the Ardèche, Donzère, Drôme, France© Xavier Delorme / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2444730

Night storm over the Ardèche, Donzère, Drôme, France

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The Huangpu at night, Shanghai, ChinaThe Huangpu at night, Shanghai, ChinaThe Huangpu at night, Shanghai, China© Claude Balcaen / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2428705

The Huangpu at night, Shanghai, China

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This image of Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis) was made on Stewart Island, New Zealand, one evening in early November 2018. After several nights searching for kiwis with volunteers from the local Wildlife Conservation Association which task of eradicating introduced mammals (SIRCET), we had finally locate two kiwis this evening. I was able to take this image using a red lamp pointed on the bird and which does not create a disturbance because the kiwi is not sensitive to red colors. I tried to show in detail this beautiful bird which is regrettably on the UICN red list because of the introduction of rats and possums on the island. The purpose of this photo is to highlight the importance of protecting these unique natives birds species of New Zeland by their way of life and their inability to fly. The red light has been corrected in post-treatment to restore a white light for aesthetic reasons.This image of Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis) was made on Stewart Island, New Zealand, one evening in early November 2018. After several nights searching for kiwis with volunteers from the local Wildlife Conservation Association which task of eradicating introduced mammals (SIRCET), we had finally locate two kiwis this evening. I was able to take this image using a red lamp pointed on the bird and which does not create a disturbance because the kiwi is not sensitive to red colors. I tried to show in detail this beautiful bird which is regrettably on the UICN red list because of the introduction of rats and possums on the island. The purpose of this photo is to highlight the importance of protecting these unique natives birds species of New Zeland by their way of life and their inability to fly. The red light has been corrected in post-treatment to restore a white light for aesthetic reasons.This image of Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis) was made on Stewart Island, New Zealand, one evening in early November 2018. After several nights searching for kiwis with volunteers from the local Wildlife Conservation Association which task of eradicating introduced mammals (SIRCET), we had finally locate two kiwis this evening. I was able to take this image using a red lamp pointed on the bird and which does not create a disturbance because the kiwi is not sensitive to red colors. I tried to show in detail this beautiful bird which is regrettably on the UICN red list because of the introduction of rats and possums on the island. The purpose of this photo is to highlight the importance of protecting these unique natives birds species of New Zeland by their way of life and their inability to fly. The red light has been corrected in post-treatment to restore a white light for aesthetic reasons.© Lucas Mugnier / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2425043

This image of Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis) was made on

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, paua New Guinea : The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, paua New Guinea : The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, paua New Guinea : The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, Papua New Guinea: The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, Papua New Guinea: The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge of Tara, Papua New Guinea: The officer on watch (OOW) is the representative of the ship’s master and has the total responsibility of safe and smooth navigation of the ship. Jonathan Lancelot (chief hyperbaric operator Tara)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2417253

Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Night watch on the bridge

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Far from the reef, black and blue light attract masses of free-swimming worms, probably bristle worms or polychaetes. D: 3 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408019

Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407998

European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407997

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407995

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Black rock scorpion (Urodacus manicatus) under UV light, NSW Australia.Black rock scorpion (Urodacus manicatus) under UV light, NSW Australia.Black rock scorpion (Urodacus manicatus) under UV light, NSW Australia.© Adam Fletcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2401934

Black rock scorpion (Urodacus manicatus) under UV light, NSW

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Scorpion photographed at night with a UV torch, amazing the way they glow.Scorpion photographed at night with a UV torch, amazing the way they glow.Scorpion photographed at night with a UV torch, amazing the way they glow.© Adam Fletcher / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2401850

Scorpion photographed at night with a UV torch, amazing the way

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Beet / chard (Beta vulgaris) nervureBeet / chard (Beta vulgaris) nervureBeet / chard (Beta vulgaris) nervure© Frédéric Didillon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2143094

Beet / chard (Beta vulgaris) nervure

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Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120284

Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the

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Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120270

Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the

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Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120269

Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the

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Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120268

Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the

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Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120267

Eccentric stalactites, El Soplao is a cave located in the

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El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120266

El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa,

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El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120265

El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa,

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El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120264

El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa,

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El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120263

El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa,

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El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, EuropeEl Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa, Valdáliga and Herrerías, Cantabria, Spain, Europe© Juan-Carlos Muñoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale, exclusive sale possible in France

2120262

El Soplao is a cave located in the municipalities of Rionansa,

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