+33 490 162 042 Call us
Facebook About us Français

Search result Anthropogenic hazard

  • Page
  • / 6

296 pictures found

Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite imageTitan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic bottled lid. A lot of sea animals ingest plastic garbage because they think it's edible food. Huge amount of plastic garbage at the surface and in midwater. Thilafushi Island. Maldives Digital composite. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2395410

Titan triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens. Biting a plastic

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2450110

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2450109

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid. Tenerife, Canary Islands.© Sergio Hanquet / BiosphotoJPG - RM

2450108

Pilot fish (Naucrates ductor) under a drifting plastic lid.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2405318

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2405317

Microplastics on table salt. Polyester microfibres. Tiny

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2405316

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. PortugalJellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a submerged plastic bag hardly resembles a jellyfish but for a sea turtle, a ocean sunfish or a dolphin the difference will not seem so obvious. So they frequently ingest drifting plastic bags or other plastic garbage they find in the ocean. Unlike their natural food plastic is not digestible and causes them obstructions of the digestive tract and a long death with great suffering. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401767

Jellyfishes and plastic bag driffting. For us, humans, a

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401765

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401764

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401763

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401762

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401761

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401760

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. PortugalPlastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401759

Plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite imageTurtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge garbage patch floating in the ocean. The animals ingest these pieces of plastic thought it is natural food and end up with the digestive tract obstructed by plastic and end up dying in great suffering. Composite. Indian Ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401758

Turtle eating a plastic cup drifting in the middle of a huge

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite imageCommon bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in the middle of a great patch of floating plastic garbage. Six pack rings or six pack yokes are a set of connected plastic rings that are used in multi-packs of beverage, particularly six packs of beverage cans.These six pack rings cause huge entaglemets in marine animals and are often mistakenly ingested because animals think it is natural food. Its transparent appearance is very similar to that of some jellyfish and certain colonial tunicates. Dolphins, turtles and fish have already been seen in these rings unable to break free. Composite. Indian ocean. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401757

Common bottlenose dolphin playing with a six pack rings found in

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the ocean. Unlike organic debris, which biodegrades, the photodegraded plastic disintegrates into smaller and smaller pieces and it concentrates in the upper water column. As it disintegrates, the plastic ultimately becomes small enough to be ingested by aquatic organisms that reside near the ocean's surface. In this way, plastic may become concentrated in neuston, thereby entering the food chain. While eating their normal sources of food, plastic ingestion can be unavoidable or the animal may mistake the plastic as a food source.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401756

Plastic toy turtle and other plastic garbage floating in the

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic trash, like the duck of this photo, degrades under the effect of sunlight and the mechanical action of wind and waves. It begins to become brittle and slowly fractures into pieces which in turn are also crumbling into smaller and smaller particles. These micro plastics and other directly derived hygiene products are consumed by various marine animals and their larvae which mistake them for food, and can be consumed by humans too via seafood, tap water or other food. The risk to people is still not known, but there are concerns that microplastics can accumulate toxic chemicals and that the tiniest could enter the bloodstream.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401755

Concept image to ilustrate marine micopastic pollution. Plastic

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401754

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic, termed “micro plastic” in the oceans derive mainly from degradation of big plastics such as beach littering, but also from sources of direct emission from example beauty scrubbers and synthetic sand-blasting. These micro plastics are ingested by marine animals –mistaking them for plankton – or via prey. When ingested, the particles affect the animals due to their physical properties and their chemical properties (the plastic polymer itself and additives) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) gathered on their surface. The latter because micro plastics have a large hydrophobic surface, which accumulate POPs to a great extent, on micro plastics than in the surrounding water.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401753

Marine fish larvae eat microplastics. Small pieces of plastic,

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a knife and spilling microplastics from within. The image is intended to illustrate the problem of pollution of the oceans by plastic garbage. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401750

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish cut in half with a

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. PortugalPlastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with other real food elements. Plastic fish and ships. We are eating plastic on our seafood. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2401749

Plastic fish food. Concept image of a fish served on a plate with

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite imageHawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite imageHawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty plastic bottle on a beach covered with plastic garbage. Hawaii - Composite image. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2397534

Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) playing with empty

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Plastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imagePlastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite imagePlastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2395869

Plastic bag monster. Concept image. Composite image. Portugal.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393045

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes weir, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393044

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic matter content on the water and toxic chemical pollution. Note that the water is also black from "black liquor" from the kraft process: extracting cellulose fibers from pulpwood.Pulp and paper mills are considered one of the most polluting industries worldwide. Paper making process demands large amount of fresh water and produces enormous quantities of wastewater contaminated by a number of organic and inorganic chemicals. Disposal of such wastewater in aquatic bodies can have severe adverse impacts on the living organisms. Here killed all animals and aquatic plants that lived in this part of the river. Abrantes, Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2393043

River pollution. Foam in Tejo (Tagus) River from high organic

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Micro plastic debris on fish stomach. PortugalMicro plastic debris on fish stomach. PortugalMicro plastic debris on fish stomach. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents
Sale prohibited for poster and Fine art print worlwide

2167929

Micro plastic debris on fish stomach. Portugal

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxWarningDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe supplying water from the water table Crau to the wastewater treatment plant, due to the leakage of oil pipeline in August 2009Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe supplying water from the water table Crau to the wastewater treatment plant, due to the leakage of oil pipeline in August 2009© David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843506

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe supplying water from the water table Crau to the wastewater treatment plant, due to the leakage of oil pipeline in August 2009Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe supplying water from the water table Crau to the wastewater treatment plant, due to the leakage of oil pipeline in August 2009© David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843505

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Pipe

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory and pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory and pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843504

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory and pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory and pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843503

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843502

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843501

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline FranceSite clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory pipes for water decontamination of groundwater de Crau, following the leak of an oil pipeline in August 2009 © David Tatin / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1843500

Site clearance in due to a leak Crau Pipeline France ; Factory

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Otter fur used to make mattresses ; Otti mat products. The otter hair retention properties of oils and hydrocarbons. Mattresses manufactured are used in case of spill to prevent the spread of oil at sea  Otter fur used to make mattressesOtter fur used to make mattresses ; Otti mat products. The otter hair retention properties of oils and hydrocarbons. Mattresses manufactured are used in case of spill to prevent the spread of oil at sea  © Pascal Goetgheluck / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

1650235

Otter fur used to make mattresses ; Otti mat products. The otter

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Veterinary nursing a Northern Gannet  ; Ingestion of carbon Veterinary nursing a Northern Gannet Veterinary nursing a Northern Gannet ; Ingestion of carbon © Jean-Louis Le Moigne / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

1650135

Veterinary nursing a Northern Gannet ; Ingestion of carbon

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Ajka alumina plant accident Toxic Sludge Ajka Hungary ; On Oct. 4, 2010, an accident occurred at the Ajkai Timföldgyar alumina (aluminum oxide) plant in western Hungary, when a corner wall of a waste-retaining pond broke, releasing a torrent of toxic red sludge down a local stream. Several nearby towns were inundated, including Kolontar and Devecser, where the sludge was up to 6.5 feet deep in places. Four people were killed immediately, several more were missing and dozens of residents were hospitalized for chemical burns.<br><br>On Oct. 9, 2010, the Advanced Land Imager on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 satellite captured this natural-color image of the area.Ajka alumina plant accident Toxic Sludge Ajka HungaryAjka alumina plant accident Toxic Sludge Ajka Hungary ; On Oct. 4, 2010, an accident occurred at the Ajkai Timföldgyar alumina (aluminum oxide) plant in western Hungary, when a corner wall of a waste-retaining pond broke, releasing a torrent of toxic red sludge down a local stream. Several nearby towns were inundated, including Kolontar and Devecser, where the sludge was up to 6.5 feet deep in places. Four people were killed immediately, several more were missing and dozens of residents were hospitalized for chemical burns.

On Oct. 9, 2010, the Advanced Land Imager on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 satellite captured this natural-color image of the area.
© N.A.S.A. / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1480210

Ajka alumina plant accident Toxic Sludge Ajka Hungary ; On Oct.

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by Agents

1443101

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by Agents

1443100

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West PapuaFrighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua© Reinhard Dirscherl / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by Agents

1443099

Frighter dumping Oil at Sea Cenderawasih Bay West Papua

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430515

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430514

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430513

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430512

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430511

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430510

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430509

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK Bremen Maltese flag on the beach failed to Kerminihy Erdeven (Morbihan 56) on 16.12.2011 near the Etel river during the storm Joachim. © Jean-Luc & Françoise Ziegler / BiosphotoJPG - RM

1430508

Cargo TK Bremen beached classified in Kerminihy  ; Cargo TK

RMRight Managed

JPG

LightboxDownload low resolution image

Next page
1 / 6

Your request is processing. Please wait...

Galleries General conditions Legal notices Photographers area





Your request has been registered.

To use this feature you must first register or login.

Log in

To organize photos in lightboxes you must first register or login. Registration is FREE! Lightboxes allow you to categorize your photos, to keep them when you sign in and send them by email.

Log in

A Biosphoto authorization has to be granted prior using this feature. We'll get in touch shortly, please check that your contact info is up to date. Feel free to contact us in case of no answer during office hours (Paris time).

Delete permanently this lightbox?

Delete permanently all items?



The lightbox has been duplicated

The lightbox has been copied in your personal account

Your request has been registered. You will receive an e-mail shortly in order to download your images.

You can insert a comment that will appear within your downloads reports.





Your lightbox has been sent.

In case of modification, changes will be seen by your recipient.

If deleted, your lightbox won't be avalaible for your recipient anymore.