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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting sponges in an attempt to extract bioactive molecules, potentially valuable in the therapeutic field (anti-infectives, anticancer), off M’dic, Morocco. Scientific mission.© Mathieu Foulquié / BiosphotoJPG - RMSale prohibited by some Agents

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Diver-Researcher at the Nice Institute of Chemistry collecting

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Controlling nitrite (NO2) in aquariumControlling nitrite (NO2) in aquariumControlling nitrite (NO2) in aquarium© Aqua Press / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Controlling nitrite (NO2) in aquarium

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, GreeceAlessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality of olives in the olive oil pfactory in Kritsa, Crete, Greece© Antoine Boureau / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Alessandra, 7 years old, in the laboratory to measure the quality

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and chief engineer of Tara, sampling plancton for o/b scientists, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Daniel Cron, first mate and

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, selecting plancton for microscopy o/b Tara.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Plancton catch, Galapagos

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS biologist, admiring a plancton catch, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Christian Sardet, CNRS

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, specialist for plancton ecology, scientific coordinator on TARA; l: r: Dr. Stéphane PESANT, spécialiste de l'écologie du plancton, coordinateur scientifique sur TARA. Pyrosomes, or pyrosoma, are free-floating colonial tunicates that live usually in the upper layers of the open ocean in warm seas, although some may be found to great depth. Pyrosomes are cylindrical or conical shaped colonies made up of hundreds to thousands of individuals, known as zooids. Colonies range in size from less than one centimeter to several meters in length. Each zooid is only a few millimeters in size, but is embedded in a common gelatinous tunic that joins all of the individuals. Each zooid opens both to the inside and outside of the "tube", drawing in ocean water from the outside to its internal filtering mesh called the branchial basket, extracting the microscopic plant cells on which it feeds, and then expelling the filtered water to the inside of the cylinder of the colony. The colony is bumpy on the outside, each bump representing a single zooid, but nearly smooth, though perforated with holes for each zooid, on the inside. Pyrosomes are planktonic, which means that their movements are largely controlled by currents, tides and waves in the oceans. On a smaller scale, however, each colony can move itself slowly by the process of jet propulsion, created by the coordinated beating of cilia in the branchial baskets of all the zooids, which also create feeding currents. Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent, flashing a pale blue-green light that can be seen for many tens of meters. The name Pyrosoma comes from the Greek (pyro = "fire", soma = "body"). Pyrosomes are closely related to salps, and are sometimes called "fire salps." Sailors on the ocean are occasionally treated to calm seas containing many pyrosomes, all bioluminescencing on a dark night. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. l: Sophie Marinesque; r: Dr.

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas, ICM-CSIC, ES; freshly filtered plancton is wrapped o/b Tara to be stored and cooled in liquid nitrogen for later analysis, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Silvia Gonzalez-Acinas,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets, deployed from Tara, Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Surface plancton nets,

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. GalapagosTara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton nets. On "station", the boat is drifting without engine or sails. Tara Oceans, a unique expedition: Tara Oceans is the very first attempt to make a global study of marine plankton, a form of sea life that includes organisms as small as viruses and bacterias, and as big as medusas. Our goal is to better understand planktonic ecosystems by exploring the countless species, learning about interactions among them and with their environment. Marine plankton is the only ecosystem that is almost continuous over the surface of the Earth. Studying plankton is like taking the pulse of our planet. Recently, scientists have discovered the great importance of plankton for the climate: populations of plankton are affected very rapidly by variations in climate. But in turn they can influence the climate by modifying the absorption of carbon. In a context of rapid physico-chemical changes, for example the acidification observed today in the world's oceans, it is urgent to understand and predict the evolution of these particular ecosystems. Finally, plankton is an astonishing way of going back in time – a prime source of fossils. Over the eons, plankton has created several hundred meters of sediment on the ocean floors. This allows us to go back in time, to the first oceans on Earth, and better understand the history of our biosphere. More than 12 fields of research are involved in the project, which will bring together an international team of oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, geneticists, and physicists from prestigious laboratories headed by Eric Karsenti of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Galapagos© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Oceans Expeditions - May 2011. Tara with deployed plancton

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber Associate Professor, Oregon State University (Scientific coordinator on Tara Milne Bay leg 1-16 Nov 2017), Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Rebecca "Becky" Vega

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, operating the Dry Lab o/b Tara: continuous data acquisition and processing area, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, recovers the "Manta net", Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, recovers the "Manta net", Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin, oceanographic engineer, recovers the "Manta net", Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Guillaume Bourdin,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of sample proceeding o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Different stages of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State UniversityTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Dr. Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Associate Professor, Oregon State University© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, Rebecca Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator, right) and Grace Klinges (student, left)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Proceeding of coral

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b TaraTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New Guinea, Local inhabitants watching Rebecca Vega Thurber confectioning fresh samples o/b Tara© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Normanby Island, Paua New

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, pectoral fin sample : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, 2 reef fish sample species : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus, photo) and Convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus, no photo)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, 2 reef fish sample species : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus, photo) and Convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus, no photo)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea, 2 reef fish sample species : Moorish idol (Zanclus cornutus, photo) and Convict surgeonfish (Acanthurus triostegus, no photo)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Confectioning of samples

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, papua New Guinea, Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning fresh coral samples o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea. from the left: Rebecca "Becky" Vega Thurber (scientific coordinator), Emilie Boissin (CRIOBE), Grace Klinges (student)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Scientists confectioning

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets Reef "finger" (deep fore reef), Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets Reef "finger" (deep fore reef), Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 7 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets Reef "finger" (deep fore reef), Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 7 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 6 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 6 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 6 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 3 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and Muli Islets, papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site. D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef, Banban and

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 3 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 3 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site Normanby, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) collecting plancton on a sampling site, D: 2 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon, Sea Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) (l) sampling coral on a small reef, isolated from the main fringing reef. D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon, Sea Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) (l) sampling coral on a small reef, isolated from the main fringing reef. D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon, Sea Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) (l) sampling coral on a small reef, isolated from the main fringing reef. D: 20 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges sampling coral, D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges sampling coral, D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges sampling coral, D: 20 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE)(l) sampling coral, D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE)(l) sampling coral, D: 20 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon Sea, Grace Klinges (r) and Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE)(l) sampling coral, D: 20 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Nubara Island, Solomon

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) (l) and Loïc Caudan (Tara chief engineer) (r), sampling coral. D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) (l) and Loïc Caudan (Tara chief engineer) (r), sampling coral. D: 9 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief) (l) and Loïc Caudan (Tara chief engineer) (r), sampling coral. D: 9 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Scientific coordinator Rebecca Vega Thurber (l) and student Grace Klinges (r) document the sampling, D: 6 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Scientific coordinator Rebecca Vega Thurber (l) and student Grace Klinges (r) document the sampling, D: 6 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll, Papua New Guinea, Scientific coordinator Rebecca Vega Thurber (l) and student Grace Klinges (r) document the sampling, D: 6 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Outer reef of Egum Atoll,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Reef Flat, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief), water sampling in coral collecting area. D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Reef Flat, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief), water sampling in coral collecting area. D: 2 mTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets, Papua New Guinea, Reef Flat, Jonathan Lancelot (Tara dive & hyperbaric chief), water sampling in coral collecting area. D: 2 m© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Banban and Muli Islets,

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site, papua New Guinea, Water sampling on collecting site. Tara team.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site, papua New Guinea, Water sampling on collecting site. Tara team.Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba Island, 1,9 km west of bubble site, papua New Guinea, Water sampling on collecting site. Tara team.© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Reef off Suba Suba

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring specialist Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) packing the cores o/b Tara, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Underwater coring

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Porites lobata (left) Diploastrea heliopora (right), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Porites lobata (left) Diploastrea heliopora (right), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Porites lobata (left) Diploastrea heliopora (right), Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Porites lobata

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of Diploastrea heliopora core, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 detail view of

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Detail view of Porites lobata core: The thin colored layer represents the living part of the coral (5 mm). Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Detail view of Porites lobata core: The thin colored layer represents the living part of the coral (5 mm). Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Detail view of Porites lobata core: The thin colored layer represents the living part of the coral (5 mm). Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Detail view of Porites

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Diploastrea heliopora (top) Porites lobata (front), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Diploastrea heliopora (top) Porites lobata (front), Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Diploastrea heliopora (top) Porites lobata (front), Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 cores: Diploastrea

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Profile of Porites lobata core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Profile of Porites lobata core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Profile of Porites lobata core, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Profile of Porites lobata

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Surface of Porites lobata core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Surface of Porites lobata core, Papua New GuineaTara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Surface of Porites lobata core, Papua New Guinea© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Surface of Porites lobata

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Papua New Guinea, 2 completed cores being handled by Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) on deck of Tara. Diploastrea heliopora (back) Porites lobata (front)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Papua New Guinea, 2 completed cores being handled by Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) on deck of Tara. Diploastrea heliopora (back) Porites lobata (front)Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Papua New Guinea, 2 completed cores being handled by Guillaume Iwankow (CRIOBE) on deck of Tara. Diploastrea heliopora (back) Porites lobata (front)© Christoph Gerigk / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Tara Pacific expedition - november 2017 Papua New Guinea, 2

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