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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of defeating the formidable predator that is the Asian hornet Vespa velutina.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Face-off between David and Goliath. The bee has no chance of

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells. We can see the different sizes of the cells for the males and for the others bees. The males' cells are a third bigger. Their width is 8.75mm and their depth 16-17mm as opposed to 6mm and 12mm for the worker bees' cells.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103560

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - A bee on the newly-built wax cells.

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel honeycombs. The bees store the nectar in the wax cells and, fanning it, transform it into honey by lowering the moisture level from 80% to 17%. The buccal exchange between bees, the trophallaxis, plays a role in the making of the honey through the addition of enzymes.© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103468

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) - In the hive between two parallel

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Recovery of a swarm of bees in a house, FranceRecovery of a swarm of bees in a house, FranceRecovery of a swarm of bees in a house, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Recovery of a swarm of bees in a house, France

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Recovery of a swarm of bees in a house, FranceRecovery of a swarm of bees in a house, FranceRecovery of a swarm of bees in a house, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Recovery of a swarm of bees in a house, France

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Swarm of bees in a house, FranceSwarm of bees in a house, FranceSwarm of bees in a house, France© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Swarm of bees in a house, France

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Jars of honey placed on beehive frames, beekeeper Christian Becker, Miellerie des quatre Fontaines, Oppenans, Haute Saone, FranceJars of honey placed on beehive frames, beekeeper Christian Becker, Miellerie des quatre Fontaines, Oppenans, Haute Saone, FranceJars of honey placed on beehive frames, beekeeper Christian Becker, Miellerie des quatre Fontaines, Oppenans, Haute Saone, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Jars of honey placed on beehive frames, beekeeper Christian

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a window in summer, Lorraine, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) in the frame of a

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) under the roof of a house in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) under the roof of a house in summer, Lorraine, FranceNest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) under the roof of a house in summer, Lorraine, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Nest of European paper wasp (Polistes dominula) under the roof of

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German Yellowjacket (right) and Paper Wasp (left) nests under the roof tiles of a pavilion in winter, Campagne, Lorraine, FranceGerman Yellowjacket (right) and Paper Wasp (left) nests under the roof tiles of a pavilion in winter, Campagne, Lorraine, FranceGerman Yellowjacket (right) and Paper Wasp (left) nests under the roof tiles of a pavilion in winter, Campagne, Lorraine, France© André Simon / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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German Yellowjacket (right) and Paper Wasp (left) nests under the

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Paper wasp (Ropalidia merina) on its nest, Andasibe, Périnet, Région Alaotra-Mangoro, MadagascarPaper wasp (Ropalidia merina) on its nest, Andasibe, Périnet, Région Alaotra-Mangoro, MadagascarPaper wasp (Ropalidia merina) on its nest, Andasibe, Périnet, Région Alaotra-Mangoro, Madagascar© Jean-Yves Grospas / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Paper wasp (Ropalidia merina) on its nest, Andasibe, Périnet,

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cellsHoney bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees (Apis mellifera) on pollen cells

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey productionBeekeeper inspecting hives during honey production© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Beekeeper inspecting hives during honey production

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Honey bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frameHoney bees on a hive frame© Eric Guilloret / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bees on a hive frame

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Nest of wasps, Polistes Gallicus or Polistes doninulus, built in a wooden garden, windowsill, house, Belfort, Territoire de Belfort, FranceNest of wasps, Polistes Gallicus or Polistes doninulus, built in a wooden garden, windowsill, house, Belfort, Territoire de Belfort, FranceNest of wasps, Polistes Gallicus or Polistes doninulus, built in a wooden garden, windowsill, house, Belfort, Territoire de Belfort, France© Denis Bringard / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Nest of wasps, Polistes Gallicus or Polistes doninulus, built in

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New CaledoniaHoney bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New CaledoniaHoney bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New Caledonia© Nicolas-Alain Petit / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Honey bee (Apis mellifera), Honeycomb on a branch of Gaiac, New

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Wild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, BrazilWild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, BrazilWild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, Brazil© Régis Cavignaux / BiosphotoJPG - RM

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Wild Bees (Apis sp), Pantanal, Brazil

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The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126378

The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to

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The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126367

The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126352

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126351

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that

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The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126327

The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey

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The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126326

The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased

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The Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126320

The Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood.

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126318

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126316

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak

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Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105421

Sampling the honey. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia

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Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, EthiopiaSampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe, Omo valley, Ethiopia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105413

Sampling the honey after a nighttime harvest. The Honey Tribe,

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Stingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless beesStingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless beesStingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105386

Stingless bee (Tetragonisca angustula) brood cell. Panama, The

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The nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless beesThe nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless beesThe nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona guatemalensis) with a royal cell. The tropical world of stingless bees© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105379

The nest of the minuscule Stingless bee (Paratrigona

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Because of the nest’s structure, comprising a single comb, the honey storage cells of the giant Himalayan bee are five to ten times longer than those of our Apis mellifera, which measure barely more than half an inch. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingBecause of the nest’s structure, comprising a single comb, the honey storage cells of the giant Himalayan bee are five to ten times longer than those of our Apis mellifera, which measure barely more than half an inch. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingBecause of the nest’s structure, comprising a single comb, the honey storage cells of the giant Himalayan bee are five to ten times longer than those of our Apis mellifera, which measure barely more than half an inch. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey hunting© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105358

Because of the nest’s structure, comprising a single comb, the

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In the world of social insects, few spectacles are as impressive as that of a colony of giant bees, where 50,000 individuals can be seen at once, tightly amassed at the top of an immense orange disc. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingIn the world of social insects, few spectacles are as impressive as that of a colony of giant bees, where 50,000 individuals can be seen at once, tightly amassed at the top of an immense orange disc. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey huntingIn the world of social insects, few spectacles are as impressive as that of a colony of giant bees, where 50,000 individuals can be seen at once, tightly amassed at the top of an immense orange disc. Solukumbu, Nepal. The tiger men honey hunting© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105355

In the world of social insects, few spectacles are as impressive

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The queen bee, surrounded by several females, on the brood cells, which for this bee, the Melipona seminigra pernigra, are built horizontally. The melipones are semi-social bees; the colonies bring together 500 to 2000 bees and the queen bees sometimes have to ask with insistence to be fed, beating their wings to demand it. Contrary to our domestic bee, there may be several queens in a melipone bee colony, but still with only one laying eggs. Stingless bees of the AmazonThe queen bee, surrounded by several females, on the brood cells, which for this bee, the Melipona seminigra pernigra, are built horizontally. The melipones are semi-social bees; the colonies bring together 500 to 2000 bees and the queen bees sometimes have to ask with insistence to be fed, beating their wings to demand it. Contrary to our domestic bee, there may be several queens in a melipone bee colony, but still with only one laying eggs. Stingless bees of the AmazonThe queen bee, surrounded by several females, on the brood cells, which for this bee, the Melipona seminigra pernigra, are built horizontally. The melipones are semi-social bees; the colonies bring together 500 to 2000 bees and the queen bees sometimes have to ask with insistence to be fed, beating their wings to demand it. Contrary to our domestic bee, there may be several queens in a melipone bee colony, but still with only one laying eggs. Stingless bees of the Amazon© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105307

The queen bee, surrounded by several females, on the brood cells,

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Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105275

Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during

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Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeMaya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during the harvest. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105274

Maya bees (Melipona beecheii) gorge themselves with honey during

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The brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeThe brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out horizontally, unlike those of European bees. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105272

The brood cells of the bees of the meliponini family are laid out

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Unlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeUnlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeUnlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee does not store the stock of honey and pollen in hexagonal cells, but in pockets sitting outside the brood cells. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105266

Unlike the European apis mellifera, the trigona scaptotrigona bee

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Belonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeBelonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable tradeBelonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s brood cells are built on the horizontal, contrary to those of the European apis mellifera. These cells are constantly filled with new eggs. The stores of honey and pollen are placed around the brood cells in pockets. Mexico stingless honeybees and equitable trade© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105261

Belonging to the meliponini tribe, the trigona scaptotrigona’s

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The honey of the untouchables, A fragment of honeycomb is about to be hand pressed. Tamil Nadu, IndiaThe honey of the untouchables, A fragment of honeycomb is about to be hand pressed. Tamil Nadu, IndiaThe honey of the untouchables, A fragment of honeycomb is about to be hand pressed. Tamil Nadu, India© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105186

The honey of the untouchables, A fragment of honeycomb is about

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On the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, AustraliaOn the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, AustraliaOn the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a Warré hive with the bees and the honey. NSW, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105161

On the roads of perpetual honey flow, The parallel combs of a

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Honey Yellow Peril - Beekeeping and mass tourism on rapeseed field in Luoping, Yunnan. The bees have built new cells and a new wax honeycomb. ChinaHoney Yellow Peril - Beekeeping and mass tourism on rapeseed field in Luoping, Yunnan. The bees have built new cells and a new wax honeycomb. ChinaHoney Yellow Peril - Beekeeping and mass tourism on rapeseed field in Luoping, Yunnan. The bees have built new cells and a new wax honeycomb. China© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105107

Honey Yellow Peril - Beekeeping and mass tourism on rapeseed

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Boatmen's beekeepers of the Parana Delta. Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) on alveoli filled with honey, ArgentinaBoatmen's beekeepers of the Parana Delta. Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) on alveoli filled with honey, ArgentinaBoatmen's beekeepers of the Parana Delta. Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) on alveoli filled with honey, Argentina© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2105069

Boatmen's beekeepers of the Parana Delta. Italian bee (Apis

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Urban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” GermanyUrban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” GermanyUrban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles au personnes que je rencontrer./// Heinz Risse, 48 years old, on the roof of the parliament of Berlin where, without protection, he is posing with an open hive. “I love observing the bees and raising them with other habitats. I regard my hives, my bee colonies as living organisms. Beekeeping is a fantastic hobby that has allowed me to meet lots of different people and I love to explain the life of the bees to people I encounter.” Germany© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103639

Urban Beekeeping - nts et j’adore expliquer la vie des abeilles

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Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USAUrban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She started beekeeping in January. “I come from Baltimore in Maryland but my family is from the country and during my childhood, we had a garden. For me, who came to New York recently, it is also a way of meeting people with different interests. I am fascinated. I open my hive every week, watching the bees is for me like meditation, a way to relax. I work for a company that makes children’s clothing”. USA© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2103625

Urban Beekeeping - Megan Paska, 29 years old, from Brooklyn. She

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A hornet attacking the bees. FranceA hornet attacking the bees. FranceA hornet attacking the bees. France© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2103613

A hornet attacking the bees. France

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