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Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, AntarcticaWeddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, AntarcticaWeddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack ice, Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adelie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) and tourists on the pack

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During snow storms, Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks, already weakened by lack of food, are even more vulnerable to Skuas predation. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaDuring snow storms, Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks, already weakened by lack of food, are even more vulnerable to Skuas predation. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaDuring snow storms, Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks, already weakened by lack of food, are even more vulnerable to Skuas predation. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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During snow storms, Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks,

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"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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"White-out" snowstorm at the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base,

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In Antarctica Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) can be covered with snow during storms. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaIn Antarctica Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) can be covered with snow during storms. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaIn Antarctica Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) can be covered with snow during storms. Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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In Antarctica Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) can be covered

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Study of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaStudy of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaStudy of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of the marine environment in Adélie Land, by the AMMER program (field: JB Thiebot and Thierry Raclot). Monitoring of pre-flight chicks: blood taken, measurements, weighing, tagging (tesa aleon), Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Study of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) as biomarkers of

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Adelie penguin colony (Pygoscelis adeliae) in the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adélie land, AntarcticaAdelie penguin colony (Pygoscelis adeliae) in the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adélie land, AntarcticaAdelie penguin colony (Pygoscelis adeliae) in the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic base, Adélie land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Adelie penguin colony (Pygoscelis adeliae) in the Dumont

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French Antarctic base Dumont d'Urville, in Adelie Land, archipelago of Pointe Géologie, island of Petrels. In normal times, the islands of the archipelago are separated by open water in summer. For 2 years, the pack ice has not broken anymore. AntarcticFrench Antarctic base Dumont d'Urville, in Adelie Land, archipelago of Pointe Géologie, island of Petrels. In normal times, the islands of the archipelago are separated by open water in summer. For 2 years, the pack ice has not broken anymore. AntarcticFrench Antarctic base Dumont d'Urville, in Adelie Land, archipelago of Pointe Géologie, island of Petrels. In normal times, the islands of the archipelago are separated by open water in summer. For 2 years, the pack ice has not broken anymore. Antarctic© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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French Antarctic base Dumont d'Urville, in Adelie Land,

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From the lookout or "nest of magpie", the second captain of the Astrolabe Julien Duroussy observes high the pack to find the best route to follow to cross and not get stuck. For this he is in constant contact with the captain on the bridge via VHF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaFrom the lookout or "nest of magpie", the second captain of the Astrolabe Julien Duroussy observes high the pack to find the best route to follow to cross and not get stuck. For this he is in constant contact with the captain on the bridge via VHF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaFrom the lookout or "nest of magpie", the second captain of the Astrolabe Julien Duroussy observes high the pack to find the best route to follow to cross and not get stuck. For this he is in constant contact with the captain on the bridge via VHF. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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From the lookout or "nest of magpie", the second captain of the

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A tourist meets a curious baby Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) in Amsterdam Island. French Southern and Antarctic LandsA tourist meets a curious baby Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) in Amsterdam Island. French Southern and Antarctic LandsA tourist meets a curious baby Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) in Amsterdam Island. French Southern and Antarctic Lands© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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A tourist meets a curious baby Subantarctic fur seal

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The Marion Dufresne arrives to the emerged crater of St. Paul Island, three days after leaving Kerguelen Islands. French Southern and Antarctic LandsThe Marion Dufresne arrives to the emerged crater of St. Paul Island, three days after leaving Kerguelen Islands. French Southern and Antarctic LandsThe Marion Dufresne arrives to the emerged crater of St. Paul Island, three days after leaving Kerguelen Islands. French Southern and Antarctic Lands© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Marion Dufresne arrives to the emerged crater of St. Paul

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Astrolabe bow caught in a storm on the way back from Antarctica, and on the way to Australia 5 days North Sea, Southern OceanAstrolabe bow caught in a storm on the way back from Antarctica, and on the way to Australia 5 days North Sea, Southern OceanAstrolabe bow caught in a storm on the way back from Antarctica, and on the way to Australia 5 days North Sea, Southern Ocean© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Astrolabe bow caught in a storm on the way back from Antarctica,

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Unloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Serge Drapeau IPEV, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading the Astrolabe by helicopter at the Dumont D'urville

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Unloading of the Astrolabe by helicopter on the Dumont D'urville base. Bust of Paul Emile Victor, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaUnloading of the Astrolabe by helicopter on the Dumont D'urville base. Bust of Paul Emile Victor, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaUnloading of the Astrolabe by helicopter on the Dumont D'urville base. Bust of Paul Emile Victor, Terre Adélie, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading of the Astrolabe by helicopter on the Dumont D'urville

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Detail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaDetail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaDetail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Detail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal

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Detail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaDetail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, AntarcticaDetail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal administration of the Dumont D'urville Antarctic Base. Philately of the TAAF. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Detail of stamps, postmarks and mailpieces at the postal

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At sea between Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, in the famous "roaring forties". French Southern and Antarctic Lands, AntarctiAt sea between Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, in the famous "roaring forties". French Southern and Antarctic Lands, AntarctiAt sea between Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, in the famous "roaring forties". French Southern and Antarctic Lands, Antarcti© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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At sea between Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, in the famous

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Snowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, AntarcticaSnowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, AntarcticaSnowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Snowstorm blown on Dumont D'urville, Adélie Land, Antarctica

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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, AntarcticaAn Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3 systems of identification and automatic weighing (mass tracker) of the ANTAVIA program, in Dumont d'Urville. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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An Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) crosses one of the 3

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The postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaThe postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaThe postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists.

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The postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaThe postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaThe postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists. Each fold requires at least 11 manipulations from the postal manager, between the receipt by the boat and the deposit in the shipping box. Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The postal manager of DDU Xavier stamps folds of philatelists.

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Every Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaEvery Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaEvery Saturday, the population of the base participates in the replenishment of the kitchens by making a human chain between the storage shed and the kitchens ... under the curious eye of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks waiting for the return of their parent to be finally, too, fed! Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Every Saturday, the population of the base participates in the

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Ornithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaOrnithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, AntarcticaOrnithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie penguin chicks in order to implant transponders (digital tagging for life in a subcutaneous flea), before their "flight". Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Ornithologists of the ANTAVIA / ECOPHY program capture Adélie

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The winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaThe winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, AntarcticaThe winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont d'Urville the highly anticipated parcels sent by their relatives, via the Astrolabe, Terre Adélie, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The winterers come to recover at the postal management of Dumont

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally,

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, AntarcticaUnloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally, mail is one of the first things landed on the boat when it arrives. Today this is done essentially to allow the postal manager time to process the mail that must leave with the boat during the same rotation. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Unloading of the postal mail at Dumont d'Urville. Traditionally,

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Bust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, AntarcticaBust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, AntarcticaBust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base in Adelie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bust of Paul Emile Victor on the Antarctic Dumont d'Urville base

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion islandThe Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is chartered by the TAAF 4 months a year to supply the subantarctic bases of Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean. A few tourists (about fifty per year) have the opportunity to take part of these logistic operations. Reunion island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Marion Dufresne II is a french research vessel. It is

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, AntarcticaReleasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric ozone on the Dumont d'Urville Antarctic Base. The Dumont d'Urville base was built largely for the study of penguins. It was built in the middle of colonies Adélie penguins. Man and penguins therefore rub shoulders daily. Adélie Land, Antarctica© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Releasing a balloon equipped with a probe measuring atmospheric

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Crater emerged from St. Paul. French Southern and Antarctic LandsCrater emerged from St. Paul. French Southern and Antarctic LandsCrater emerged from St. Paul. French Southern and Antarctic Lands© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Crater emerged from St. Paul. French Southern and Antarctic Lands

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The two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticThe two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, AntarcticThe two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of the postal management of DDU, Dumont-d'Urville Antarctic Base, Terre Adélie, Antarctic© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The two managers of postal stewardship (TA64 - TA 65) in front of

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Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) male on the shore and Marion Dufresne in the background, Amsterdam Island, French Southern and Antarctic LandsSubantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) male on the shore and Marion Dufresne in the background, Amsterdam Island, French Southern and Antarctic LandsSubantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) male on the shore and Marion Dufresne in the background, Amsterdam Island, French Southern and Antarctic Lands© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) male on the

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Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La RéunionPetite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues marines Kelonia et baptisée "Charlie" en hommage à la tuerie de Charle Hebdo à Paris le même jour, La Réunion© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Petite tortue terrestre née au centre de soins de tortues

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Rescue of a sea turtle that weights 200kg on the Juan de Nova island (Eparses Islands, France) by soldiers from the 2nd Regiment of the Gunner Paratrooper of Tarbes while in a sovereignty mission on the island. They have been helped by the only policeman on the island and were asked by Kelonia to follow the egg-laying of the turtle on the island. A group of soldiers are carrying a green turtle to the sea as it has been caught in the rocks while coming back from egg-laying on the beach. Soldiers are taking over from each other every 45 minutes so the french sovereignty of the island can be guaranteed as it is lusted after by Madagascar. The Eparses Islands give France a 640 000 km2 (whereas it's only 44km2 wide) and an amazing natural and conserving patrimony.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Rescue of a sea turtle that weights 200kg on the Juan de Nova island (Eparses Islands, France) by soldiers from the 2nd Regiment of the Gunner Paratrooper of Tarbes while in a sovereignty mission on the island. They have been helped by the only policeman on the island and were asked by Kelonia to follow the egg-laying of the turtle on the island. A group of soldiers are carrying a green turtle to the sea as it has been caught in the rocks while coming back from egg-laying on the beach. Soldiers are taking over from each other every 45 minutes so the french sovereignty of the island can be guaranteed as it is lusted after by Madagascar. The Eparses Islands give France a 640 000 km2 (whereas it's only 44km2 wide) and an amazing natural and conserving patrimony.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Rescue of a sea turtle that weights 200kg on the Juan de Nova island (Eparses Islands, France) by soldiers from the 2nd Regiment of the Gunner Paratrooper of Tarbes while in a sovereignty mission on the island. They have been helped by the only policeman on the island and were asked by Kelonia to follow the egg-laying of the turtle on the island. A group of soldiers are carrying a green turtle to the sea as it has been caught in the rocks while coming back from egg-laying on the beach. Soldiers are taking over from each other every 45 minutes so the french sovereignty of the island can be guaranteed as it is lusted after by Madagascar. The Eparses Islands give France a 640 000 km2 (whereas it's only 44km2 wide) and an amazing natural and conserving patrimony.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Rescue of a sea turtle that weights 200kg on the Juan de Nova

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Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102654

Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade

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Inside of the stomach of a loggerhead sea turtle that weighted 48kgs and who died of internal hemorrhage due to a hook, including 217g of plastic contents. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Inside of the stomach of a loggerhead sea turtle that weighted 48kgs and who died of internal hemorrhage due to a hook, including 217g of plastic contents. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Inside of the stomach of a loggerhead sea turtle that weighted 48kgs and who died of internal hemorrhage due to a hook, including 217g of plastic contents. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102653

Inside of the stomach of a loggerhead sea turtle that weighted

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Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of Kelonia in the Reunion Island. Herbivore, carnivorous, wounded, convalescing or in great shape... every turtle receive a personal treatment in accordance to ts fondnesses and food needs. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102652

Preparing the daily individual food portion of every turtle of

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Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and administer a loggerhead sea turtle a shot. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102651

Bernardin is a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island, and

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Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a turtle out of the public aquarium so he can brush her and take the seaweeds that are growing on its shell away. This 206-kg green sea turtle was born in th ecentre in 1989 (26 years old) and named Sandrine. In the absence of their natural commensals, algaes and other parasites tend to develop on sea turtles. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102650

Alain, a healer at Kelonia in the Reunion Island is taking a

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Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion IslandStéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering turtle in a pool at the health care centre, Reunion Island© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102649

Stéphane Ciccione, manager of KELONIA, putting a recovering

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Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island, carrying a recovering loggerhead turtle in a pool with the help of a nurse. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102648

Stephane Ciccione (red tshirt), manager of the KELONIA centre in

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Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102647

Visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion

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Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in REunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102646

Visitors watching giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre in

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Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102645

Thierry is guiding the visitors in the public part of the KELONIA

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Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA centre, Reunion Island? Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102644

Visitors in front of the window of the big aquarium at KELONIA

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One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island cleaning the window of the big aquarium before the visitors arrive, next to a friendly loggerhead sea turtle, used to being pampered by the nurses. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102643

One of the nurses from the KELONIA centre in Reunion Island

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Leatherback sea turtle displayed at the museum part of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island, dedicated to raising awareness towards the protection of sea turtles among the population. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Leatherback sea turtle displayed at the museum part of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island, dedicated to raising awareness towards the protection of sea turtles among the population. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Leatherback sea turtle displayed at the museum part of the KELONIA centre on Reunion Island, dedicated to raising awareness towards the protection of sea turtles among the population. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102642

Leatherback sea turtle displayed at the museum part of the

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The rescue of a 22-kg sea turtke on Juan da Nova Island (Scattered Islands, France), by soldiers of the 2nd parachute artillery regiment of Tarbes, during a sovereignty mission on the island. Helped by the only policemen in charge of the island and appointed by KELONIA to monitor the turtles' egg-laying on Juan da Nova. The group is carrying a green sea turtle with difficulty, as it was stuck in rocks after having layed her eggs on the beach. Military detachments take shifts every 45 days on San Juan da Nova to assert French sovereignty on this small coral island ( five km by one km), coveted by Madagascar. For France, the Scattered Islands insure both a huge EEZ of 640 000 Km2 (with only 44 Km2 of dry land), and an exceptionnal natural heritage. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.The rescue of a 22-kg sea turtke on Juan da Nova Island (Scattered Islands, France), by soldiers of the 2nd parachute artillery regiment of Tarbes, during a sovereignty mission on the island. Helped by the only policemen in charge of the island and appointed by KELONIA to monitor the turtles' egg-laying on Juan da Nova. The group is carrying a green sea turtle with difficulty, as it was stuck in rocks after having layed her eggs on the beach. Military detachments take shifts every 45 days on San Juan da Nova to assert French sovereignty on this small coral island ( five km by one km), coveted by Madagascar. For France, the Scattered Islands insure both a huge EEZ of 640 000 Km2 (with only 44 Km2 of dry land), and an exceptionnal natural heritage. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.The rescue of a 22-kg sea turtke on Juan da Nova Island (Scattered Islands, France), by soldiers of the 2nd parachute artillery regiment of Tarbes, during a sovereignty mission on the island. Helped by the only policemen in charge of the island and appointed by KELONIA to monitor the turtles' egg-laying on Juan da Nova. The group is carrying a green sea turtle with difficulty, as it was stuck in rocks after having layed her eggs on the beach. Military detachments take shifts every 45 days on San Juan da Nova to assert French sovereignty on this small coral island ( five km by one km), coveted by Madagascar. For France, the Scattered Islands insure both a huge EEZ of 640 000 Km2 (with only 44 Km2 of dry land), and an exceptionnal natural heritage. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102641

The rescue of a 22-kg sea turtke on Juan da Nova Island

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Martial Tricotteux, policeman, conducting his daily surveillance patrol on the small island of Juan da Nova (Scattered Islands), also monitoring the turtles' egg-laying on the behalf of KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Martial Tricotteux, policeman, conducting his daily surveillance patrol on the small island of Juan da Nova (Scattered Islands), also monitoring the turtles' egg-laying on the behalf of KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Martial Tricotteux, policeman, conducting his daily surveillance patrol on the small island of Juan da Nova (Scattered Islands), also monitoring the turtles' egg-laying on the behalf of KELONIA centre on Reunion Island. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102640

Martial Tricotteux, policeman, conducting his daily surveillance

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Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in Reunion Island. Herbivorous, carnivorous, injured, recovering, in the best of shape... Each turtle enjoys a personalized treatment according to its needs and food preferences. Since sea turtles have become a protected species and the trade of their meat and shell has been banned, the “Ferme Corail” in the Reunion Island, specialized in sea turtle farming for human consumption, reinvented itself in 1997 into turtle’s conservation activities. The structure named “KELONIA” grew and is now dedicated to their protection via a health care center that takes in a large number of injured turtles every week in order to heal them and release them in the ocean – after several weeks of treatment in some cases. Kelonia is also trying to put emphasis on the general public’s awareness. That’s why a museum and aquariums with turtles from all around the Reunion seas were created. And, the turtles, which are living within the aquarium, enable the biologists to go further in their studies of those rare species that are difficult to observe in nature. When released, some turtles are thus equipped with Argos beacons thanks to which we can know their movement in the ocean better and so, refine the protection of their natural environment.© Thibaut Vergoz / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

2102639

Thomas feeding the giant tortoises at the KELONIA centre, in

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