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Search result :auteur:id=1137

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110 pictures found

False Eyelash Viper (Sibon argus), Panama.False Eyelash Viper (Sibon argus), Panama.False Eyelash Viper (Sibon argus), Panama.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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False Eyelash Viper (Sibon argus), Panama.

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American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eating Alkali Flies (Ephydra hians) in Mono Lake, Mono County, California. The flies, along with brine shrimp, are the only invertebrates capable of living in the highly saline and alkaline water of the lake. Many migratory birds depend on these two species for food during stop-overs in their annual flights.American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eating Alkali Flies (Ephydra hians) in Mono Lake, Mono County, California. The flies, along with brine shrimp, are the only invertebrates capable of living in the highly saline and alkaline water of the lake. Many migratory birds depend on these two species for food during stop-overs in their annual flights.American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eating Alkali Flies (Ephydra hians) in Mono Lake, Mono County, California. The flies, along with brine shrimp, are the only invertebrates capable of living in the highly saline and alkaline water of the lake. Many migratory birds depend on these two species for food during stop-overs in their annual flights.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eating Alkali Flies

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Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn

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Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola), Clear Lake, Linn

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Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding by some

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Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) swimming by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) swimming by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) swimming by some Roundstem Tule (Schoenoplectus acutus), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pair of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) swimming by some

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Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Grand Mesa, Colorado, USACedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Grand Mesa, Colorado, USACedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Grand Mesa, Colorado, USA© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Grand Mesa, Colorado, USA

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Western Spruce Budworm pupa (Choristoneura occidentalis). Photographed in northern California. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Western Spruce Budworm pupa (Choristoneura occidentalis). Photographed in northern California. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Western Spruce Budworm pupa (Choristoneura occidentalis). Photographed in northern California. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Western Spruce Budworm pupa (Choristoneura occidentalis).

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Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) larva. Photographed in central Washington. This insect is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Damage caused by the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura

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Bones recovered from an asphalt bed in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, California. These bones are from an extinct species of turkey, Parapavo californicus, from the Pleistocene period. From a collection at Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.Bones recovered from an asphalt bed in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, California. These bones are from an extinct species of turkey, Parapavo californicus, from the Pleistocene period. From a collection at Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.Bones recovered from an asphalt bed in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, California. These bones are from an extinct species of turkey, Parapavo californicus, from the Pleistocene period. From a collection at Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bones recovered from an asphalt bed in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara

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The California thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) is a large thrasher found primarily in chaparral habitat in California and Baja California. It prefers keeping hidden in deep brush and is therefore rarely seen, though common throughout its range. Males can be seen calling from high perches during springtime mating season.The California thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) is a large thrasher found primarily in chaparral habitat in California and Baja California. It prefers keeping hidden in deep brush and is therefore rarely seen, though common throughout its range. Males can be seen calling from high perches during springtime mating season.The California thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) is a large thrasher found primarily in chaparral habitat in California and Baja California. It prefers keeping hidden in deep brush and is therefore rarely seen, though common throughout its range. Males can be seen calling from high perches during springtime mating season.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The California thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) is a large thrasher

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Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) is a large New World Sparrow.Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) is a large New World Sparrow.Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) is a large New World Sparrow.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) is a large New World Sparrow.

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Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia. Their ability to curl into a ball, presenting only an armored exterior, is the best defense against predators. This animal’s large digging claws are visible.Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia. Their ability to curl into a ball, presenting only an armored exterior, is the best defense against predators. This animal’s large digging claws are visible.Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia. Their ability to curl into a ball, presenting only an armored exterior, is the best defense against predators. This animal’s large digging claws are visible.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in

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Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia.Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia.Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in parts of South America from northern Argentina to Bolivia.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is found in

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Roosevelt Elk herd (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) in Redwood National Park. The herd tends to keep the young surrounded for protection. This herd is commonly seen in or near the Park. Also known as Olympic Elk, these are the largest of the four surviving subspecies of elk in North America. They live in the rain forests of the Pacific Northwest.Roosevelt Elk herd (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) in Redwood National Park. The herd tends to keep the young surrounded for protection. This herd is commonly seen in or near the Park. Also known as Olympic Elk, these are the largest of the four surviving subspecies of elk in North America. They live in the rain forests of the Pacific Northwest.Roosevelt Elk herd (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) in Redwood National Park. The herd tends to keep the young surrounded for protection. This herd is commonly seen in or near the Park. Also known as Olympic Elk, these are the largest of the four surviving subspecies of elk in North America. They live in the rain forests of the Pacific Northwest.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Roosevelt Elk herd (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) in Redwood

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Creeping Vole (Microtus oregoni), Olympic Peninsula, Washington.Creeping Vole (Microtus oregoni), Olympic Peninsula, Washington.Creeping Vole (Microtus oregoni), Olympic Peninsula, Washington.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Creeping Vole (Microtus oregoni), Olympic Peninsula, Washington.

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Ring-necked Duck and ducklings. Ring-necked ducks are diving ducks that feed mainly by diving or dabbling at the surface. The female lays one egg per day up to 8 or 10 total. Chicks are incubated 25-29 days and the female may remain with the young until they are able to fly. Photographed on Hosmer Lake, Cascade Lakes Region, Oregon.Ring-necked Duck and ducklings. Ring-necked ducks are diving ducks that feed mainly by diving or dabbling at the surface. The female lays one egg per day up to 8 or 10 total. Chicks are incubated 25-29 days and the female may remain with the young until they are able to fly. Photographed on Hosmer Lake, Cascade Lakes Region, Oregon.Ring-necked Duck and ducklings. Ring-necked ducks are diving ducks that feed mainly by diving or dabbling at the surface. The female lays one egg per day up to 8 or 10 total. Chicks are incubated 25-29 days and the female may remain with the young until they are able to fly. Photographed on Hosmer Lake, Cascade Lakes Region, Oregon.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Ring-necked Duck and ducklings. Ring-necked ducks are diving

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Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp

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Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp habitats such as stream sides, wet meadows and alder thickets. They occur from northern California to a small portion of British Columbia. Adults are capable of jumping over 150 cm.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pacific Jumping Mice, Zapus trinotatus, are found in damp

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Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventer), Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventer), Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventer), Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventer), Rocky Mountain

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Hay Pile of American Pika (Ochotona princeps), Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and so must gather plant material for winter consumption.Hay Pile of American Pika (Ochotona princeps), Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and so must gather plant material for winter consumption.Hay Pile of American Pika (Ochotona princeps), Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and so must gather plant material for winter consumption.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hay Pile of American Pika (Ochotona princeps), Gold King Basin,

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American Pika (Ochotona princeps) collecting plant material, Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and must make hay piles for winter consumption. The species contains five subspecies, all of which can be found in western North America.American Pika (Ochotona princeps) collecting plant material, Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and must make hay piles for winter consumption. The species contains five subspecies, all of which can be found in western North America.American Pika (Ochotona princeps) collecting plant material, Gold King Basin, Colorado. Pikas do not hibernate and must make hay piles for winter consumption. The species contains five subspecies, all of which can be found in western North America.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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American Pika (Ochotona princeps) collecting plant material, Gold

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Belding’s Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beldingi), Lee Vining, Mono County, California.Belding’s Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beldingi), Lee Vining, Mono County, California.Belding’s Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beldingi), Lee Vining, Mono County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Belding’s Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beldingi), Lee Vining,

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North American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, OregonNorth American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, OregonNorth American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, Oregon© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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North American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade

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North American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, OregonNorth American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, OregonNorth American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade Lakes, Deschutes County, Oregon© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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North American Deermouse, (Peromyscus maniculatus), Cascade

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Greenmark Hermit Crabs (Pagurus caurinus) competing for a mate. Olympic Peninsula, Washington.Greenmark Hermit Crabs (Pagurus caurinus) competing for a mate. Olympic Peninsula, Washington.Greenmark Hermit Crabs (Pagurus caurinus) competing for a mate. Olympic Peninsula, Washington.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Greenmark Hermit Crabs (Pagurus caurinus) competing for a mate.

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Polychaete Benthic Bristle Worm (Scoloplos armiger), San Luis Obispo County, California.Polychaete Benthic Bristle Worm (Scoloplos armiger), San Luis Obispo County, California.Polychaete Benthic Bristle Worm (Scoloplos armiger), San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Polychaete Benthic Bristle Worm (Scoloplos armiger), San Luis

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Spittlebugs (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.Spittlebugs (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.Spittlebugs (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Spittlebugs (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of

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Damage to a Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) caused by the California Oak Moth (Phryganidia californica), the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.Damage to a Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) caused by the California Oak Moth (Phryganidia californica), the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.Damage to a Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) caused by the California Oak Moth (Phryganidia californica), the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Damage to a Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) caused by the

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Spanish Shawl Nudibranch (Flabellina iodinae), Santa Barbara County, California.Spanish Shawl Nudibranch (Flabellina iodinae), Santa Barbara County, California.Spanish Shawl Nudibranch (Flabellina iodinae), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Spanish Shawl Nudibranch (Flabellina iodinae), Santa Barbara

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Janolus fuscus is a nudibranch that ranges from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to central California. It is also known from Japan.Janolus fuscus is a nudibranch that ranges from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to central California. It is also known from Japan.Janolus fuscus is a nudibranch that ranges from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to central California. It is also known from Japan.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Janolus fuscus is a nudibranch that ranges from the Kenai

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Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San

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Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hilton’s Phidiana (Phidiana hiltoni) near a rocky shore, San

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Eastern Tiger Salamander (Amblystoma tigrinum).Eastern Tiger Salamander (Amblystoma tigrinum).Eastern Tiger Salamander (Amblystoma tigrinum).© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Eastern Tiger Salamander (Amblystoma tigrinum).

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Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the

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Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the west coast of the United States from Central California inland through Idaho. They live from sea level to more than 10,000 feet.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Sierran Chorus Frog Tadpole (Pseudacris sierra) ranges from the

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Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander (Ensatina escholtzii platensis), Yosemite National Park, California.Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander (Ensatina escholtzii platensis), Yosemite National Park, California.Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander (Ensatina escholtzii platensis), Yosemite National Park, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander (Ensatina escholtzii

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Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus), Santa Barbara County, California.Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus), Santa Barbara County,

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Northwestern Garter Snake (Thamnophis ordinoides) in Linn County, Oregon. This species is found from sw British Columbia to extreme nw California, mostly west of the Cascades. The coloration of this species varies greatly, but it usually has a well-defined dorsal stripe.Northwestern Garter Snake (Thamnophis ordinoides) in Linn County, Oregon. This species is found from sw British Columbia to extreme nw California, mostly west of the Cascades. The coloration of this species varies greatly, but it usually has a well-defined dorsal stripe.Northwestern Garter Snake (Thamnophis ordinoides) in Linn County, Oregon. This species is found from sw British Columbia to extreme nw California, mostly west of the Cascades. The coloration of this species varies greatly, but it usually has a well-defined dorsal stripe.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Northwestern Garter Snake (Thamnophis ordinoides) in Linn County,

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Night snake (Hypsiglena torquata), is a species of rear-fanged colubrid snakes. It ranges throughout the southwestern and western United States, as well as Mexico and British Columbia. Photographed in Santa Barbara County, California.Night snake (Hypsiglena torquata), is a species of rear-fanged colubrid snakes. It ranges throughout the southwestern and western United States, as well as Mexico and British Columbia. Photographed in Santa Barbara County, California.Night snake (Hypsiglena torquata), is a species of rear-fanged colubrid snakes. It ranges throughout the southwestern and western United States, as well as Mexico and British Columbia. Photographed in Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Night snake (Hypsiglena torquata), is a species of rear-fanged

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Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) mother and ducklings perching on submerged log. Clear Lake, Linn County, OregonCommon Merganser (Mergus merganser) mother and ducklings perching on submerged log. Clear Lake, Linn County, OregonCommon Merganser (Mergus merganser) mother and ducklings perching on submerged log. Clear Lake, Linn County, Oregon© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) mother and ducklings perching

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Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), Grand Mesa, Colorado.Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), Grand Mesa, Colorado.Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), Grand Mesa, Colorado.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), Grand Mesa, Colorado.

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Spittlebug (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.Spittlebug (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.Spittlebug (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of “spittle” the larval stage excretes from epidermal glands near its anus. The foam is produced from juices of their host plant, in this case Coyote Brush (Baccharis pilularis), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Spittlebug (Genus Aphrophora) are named for the mass of

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Pepsis Wasp (Pepsis chrysothemis) female, Monterey County, California. The wasp is feeding on nectar from a milkweed inflorescence.Pepsis Wasp (Pepsis chrysothemis) female, Monterey County, California. The wasp is feeding on nectar from a milkweed inflorescence.Pepsis Wasp (Pepsis chrysothemis) female, Monterey County, California. The wasp is feeding on nectar from a milkweed inflorescence.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pepsis Wasp (Pepsis chrysothemis) female, Monterey County,

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Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the

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Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the very saline Mono Lake, located on the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. The brine shrimp multiply in vast numbers which provide a food source for millions of migrating birds.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Mono Lake Brine Shrimp (Artemia monica) are endemic only to the

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California Oakworm adult (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.California Oakworm adult (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.California Oakworm adult (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California. The caterpillars can strip a tree of all leaves but the Coast Live Oak trees usually recover in subsequent years.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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California Oakworm adult (Phryganidia californica), is the most

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California Oakworm caterpillars (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California.California Oakworm caterpillars (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California.California Oakworm caterpillars (Phryganidia californica), is the most important oak-feeding caterpillar throughout its range, which extends along the coast and through the coastal mountains of California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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California Oakworm caterpillars (Phryganidia californica), is the

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California Sister Butterfly (Adelpha californica) is found from northern Baja California, most of California, western Nevada and western Oregon of the United States.California Sister Butterfly (Adelpha californica) is found from northern Baja California, most of California, western Nevada and western Oregon of the United States.California Sister Butterfly (Adelpha californica) is found from northern Baja California, most of California, western Nevada and western Oregon of the United States.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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California Sister Butterfly (Adelpha californica) is found from

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Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Desmocerus aureipennis), occurs in the United States and Canada. Photographed in Oregon.Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Desmocerus aureipennis), occurs in the United States and Canada. Photographed in Oregon.Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Desmocerus aureipennis), occurs in the United States and Canada. Photographed in Oregon.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Desmocerus aureipennis), occurs in

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Antlion larva (Myrmeleon sp.) Santa Barbara County, California. Antlion larvae dig cone shaped pits, burying themselves at the bottom of the pit, awaiting ants or other small arthropods to fall in, thereby becoming prey.Antlion larva (Myrmeleon sp.) Santa Barbara County, California. Antlion larvae dig cone shaped pits, burying themselves at the bottom of the pit, awaiting ants or other small arthropods to fall in, thereby becoming prey.Antlion larva (Myrmeleon sp.) Santa Barbara County, California. Antlion larvae dig cone shaped pits, burying themselves at the bottom of the pit, awaiting ants or other small arthropods to fall in, thereby becoming prey.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Antlion larva (Myrmeleon sp.) Santa Barbara County, California.

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Blue-eyed Katydid (Ischnomela pulchripennis), photographed at night in El Valle, Panama.Blue-eyed Katydid (Ischnomela pulchripennis), photographed at night in El Valle, Panama.Blue-eyed Katydid (Ischnomela pulchripennis), photographed at night in El Valle, Panama.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Blue-eyed Katydid (Ischnomela pulchripennis), photographed at

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Rain Beetle (Pleoccoma badia hirsuta), Santa Barbara County, California. Rain beetle males emerge from underground pupae in response to snow or rain in western North America. The males search for and mate with the flightless females.Rain Beetle (Pleoccoma badia hirsuta), Santa Barbara County, California. Rain beetle males emerge from underground pupae in response to snow or rain in western North America. The males search for and mate with the flightless females.Rain Beetle (Pleoccoma badia hirsuta), Santa Barbara County, California. Rain beetle males emerge from underground pupae in response to snow or rain in western North America. The males search for and mate with the flightless females.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Rain Beetle (Pleoccoma badia hirsuta), Santa Barbara County,

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Rhinoceros beetle (Ancognatha vexans) is a newly described species of scarab beetle from the mountains of Chiriqui Province in western Panama and from southern Costa Rica.Rhinoceros beetle (Ancognatha vexans) is a newly described species of scarab beetle from the mountains of Chiriqui Province in western Panama and from southern Costa Rica.Rhinoceros beetle (Ancognatha vexans) is a newly described species of scarab beetle from the mountains of Chiriqui Province in western Panama and from southern Costa Rica.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Rhinoceros beetle (Ancognatha vexans) is a newly described

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Big-eared Woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California. It is endemic to northern Baja California and portions of California.Big-eared Woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California. It is endemic to northern Baja California and portions of California.Big-eared Woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California. It is endemic to northern Baja California and portions of California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Big-eared Woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), Carrizo Plain National

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Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens) is endemic to California’s Central Valley and is listed as endangered by both federal and state agencies.Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens) is endemic to California’s Central Valley and is listed as endangered by both federal and state agencies.Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens) is endemic to California’s Central Valley and is listed as endangered by both federal and state agencies.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens) is endemic to

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Brush Rabbit. The Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani) is also known as Western Brush Rabbit or California Brush Rabbit. It is a species of cottontail rabbit found in western coastal regions of North America from Oregon to the southern tip of Baja California Peninsula.Brush Rabbit. The Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani) is also known as Western Brush Rabbit or California Brush Rabbit. It is a species of cottontail rabbit found in western coastal regions of North America from Oregon to the southern tip of Baja California Peninsula.Brush Rabbit. The Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani) is also known as Western Brush Rabbit or California Brush Rabbit. It is a species of cottontail rabbit found in western coastal regions of North America from Oregon to the southern tip of Baja California Peninsula.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Brush Rabbit. The Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani) is also

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Botta's Pocket Gopher. Botta’s Pocket Gopher (Thomomys bottae) is native to western North America.Botta's Pocket Gopher. Botta’s Pocket Gopher (Thomomys bottae) is native to western North America.Botta's Pocket Gopher. Botta’s Pocket Gopher (Thomomys bottae) is native to western North America.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Botta's Pocket Gopher. Botta’s Pocket Gopher (Thomomys bottae)

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Male California Quail. Male California Quail (Callipepla californica), San Luis Obispo County, California.Male California Quail. Male California Quail (Callipepla californica), San Luis Obispo County, California.Male California Quail. Male California Quail (Callipepla californica), San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Male California Quail. Male California Quail (Callipepla

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Canyon Wren feeding young. Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus) feeding young, Santa Barbara County, California.Canyon Wren feeding young. Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus) feeding young, Santa Barbara County, California.Canyon Wren feeding young. Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus) feeding young, Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Canyon Wren feeding young. Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus)

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Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard. Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia sila) is a species of lizard in the family Crotaphytidae. The species is endemic to Southern California and is listed as a federal and state endangered species.Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard. Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia sila) is a species of lizard in the family Crotaphytidae. The species is endemic to Southern California and is listed as a federal and state endangered species.Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard. Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia sila) is a species of lizard in the family Crotaphytidae. The species is endemic to Southern California and is listed as a federal and state endangered species.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard. Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia

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Western Patchnose Snake. Western Patchnose Snake (Salvadora hexalepis) from San Luis Obispo County, California.Western Patchnose Snake. Western Patchnose Snake (Salvadora hexalepis) from San Luis Obispo County, California.Western Patchnose Snake. Western Patchnose Snake (Salvadora hexalepis) from San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Western Patchnose Snake. Western Patchnose Snake (Salvadora

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Queen Snake. Queen Snake (Regina septemvittata), Telluride, Colorado, USAQueen Snake. Queen Snake (Regina septemvittata), Telluride, Colorado, USAQueen Snake. Queen Snake (Regina septemvittata), Telluride, Colorado, USA© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Queen Snake. Queen Snake (Regina septemvittata), Telluride,

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Northern Pacific Rattlesnake. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus) is a venomous pit viper species found in North America in parts of British Columbia, western United States and northwestern Mexico. Photographed in Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.Northern Pacific Rattlesnake. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus) is a venomous pit viper species found in North America in parts of British Columbia, western United States and northwestern Mexico. Photographed in Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.Northern Pacific Rattlesnake. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus) is a venomous pit viper species found in North America in parts of British Columbia, western United States and northwestern Mexico. Photographed in Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Northern Pacific Rattlesnake. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

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Habitat of Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. Typical habitat of the Southern Pacific Pond Turtle, Monterey County, CaliforniaHabitat of Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. Typical habitat of the Southern Pacific Pond Turtle, Monterey County, CaliforniaHabitat of Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. Typical habitat of the Southern Pacific Pond Turtle, Monterey County, California© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Habitat of Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. Typical habitat of the

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Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle

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Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata pallida) occurs from just south of San Francisco Bay to Baja California. These turtles do not start reproducing until 7-10 years of age. It is a species of special concern.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Southern Pacific Pond Turtle. The Southern Pacific Pond Turtle

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Northwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USANorthwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USANorthwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USA© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Northwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria

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Northwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USANorthwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USANorthwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis) found at 10,000 ft. on Grand Mesa, Colorado, USA© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Northwestern Fritillary. Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria

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Rove beetle on white backgroundRove beetle on white backgroundRove beetle on white background© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Rove beetle on white background

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Nuttall's Blister Beetle. Nuttall’s Blister Beetle (Lytta nuttallii), Granby, Colorado. These beetles can be a pest on rapeseed plants.Nuttall's Blister Beetle. Nuttall’s Blister Beetle (Lytta nuttallii), Granby, Colorado. These beetles can be a pest on rapeseed plants.Nuttall's Blister Beetle. Nuttall’s Blister Beetle (Lytta nuttallii), Granby, Colorado. These beetles can be a pest on rapeseed plants.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Nuttall's Blister Beetle. Nuttall’s Blister Beetle (Lytta

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Police car Moth. The Police-car Moth or Green Lattice moth (Gnophaela vermiculata) is in the family Erebidae. It is found in the western parts of the United States and south-western Canada.Police car Moth. The Police-car Moth or Green Lattice moth (Gnophaela vermiculata) is in the family Erebidae. It is found in the western parts of the United States and south-western Canada.Police car Moth. The Police-car Moth or Green Lattice moth (Gnophaela vermiculata) is in the family Erebidae. It is found in the western parts of the United States and south-western Canada.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Police car Moth. The Police-car Moth or Green Lattice moth

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in the family Theridiidae. Its Hawaiian name is nananana makaki’i (face-patterned spider). Photographed on big island of Hawaii.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hawaiian Happy Face Spider (Theridion grallator) is a spider in

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Flesh Fly's Head. High magnification photograph of a Flesh Fly’s head.Flesh Fly's Head. High magnification photograph of a Flesh Fly’s head.Flesh Fly's Head. High magnification photograph of a Flesh Fly’s head.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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Flesh Fly's Head. High magnification photograph of a Flesh

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Flesh Fly. Flesh Fly close up utilizing 26 images focus stacked in Photoshop.Flesh Fly. Flesh Fly close up utilizing 26 images focus stacked in Photoshop.Flesh Fly. Flesh Fly close up utilizing 26 images focus stacked in Photoshop.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Flesh Fly. Flesh Fly close up utilizing 26 images focus stacked

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Bighorn Sheep at rest, Rocky Mountain Natl. Park. Except for during the rut, bighorn sheep males tend to stay together. Here they are resting on a hillside in Rocky Mountain National Park.Bighorn Sheep at rest, Rocky Mountain Natl. Park. Except for during the rut, bighorn sheep males tend to stay together. Here they are resting on a hillside in Rocky Mountain National Park.Bighorn Sheep at rest, Rocky Mountain Natl. Park. Except for during the rut, bighorn sheep males tend to stay together. Here they are resting on a hillside in Rocky Mountain National Park.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Bighorn Sheep at rest, Rocky Mountain Natl. Park. Except for

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Catalina moth (Lophocampa indistincta) is a moth of the family Erebidae. It is found in California where it is only found on the Channel Islands.Catalina moth (Lophocampa indistincta) is a moth of the family Erebidae. It is found in California where it is only found on the Channel Islands.Catalina moth (Lophocampa indistincta) is a moth of the family Erebidae. It is found in California where it is only found on the Channel Islands.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Catalina moth (Lophocampa indistincta) is a moth of the family

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The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the

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The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the family Erebidae. The larvae feed on leaves of alder, willow and other hardwoods. It is found across Canada, the western parts of the United States, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to South Carolina and Kentucky.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Spotted Tussock Moth (Lophocampa maculata) is a member of the

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California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara,

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California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara, California. This little crustacean is found in vernal pools. It swims by waving its appendages which also serve as gills and for food gathering. It eats both plants and small aquatic organisms. It is preyed upon by amphibians and birds.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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California Clam Shrimp (Cyzicus californicus), Santa Barbara,

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Velvet worms are represented by the Phylum Onychophora of which about 200 species have been identified. They have physical features similar to Arthropods and Water Bears (Tardigrades). This individual was photographed in Panama.Velvet worms are represented by the Phylum Onychophora of which about 200 species have been identified. They have physical features similar to Arthropods and Water Bears (Tardigrades). This individual was photographed in Panama.Velvet worms are represented by the Phylum Onychophora of which about 200 species have been identified. They have physical features similar to Arthropods and Water Bears (Tardigrades). This individual was photographed in Panama.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Velvet worms are represented by the Phylum Onychophora of which

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Western Spadefoot (Spea hammondii), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.Western Spadefoot (Spea hammondii), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.Western Spadefoot (Spea hammondii), Carrizo Plain National Monument, San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Western Spadefoot (Spea hammondii), Carrizo Plain National

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The New Granada cross-banded tree frog (Smilisca phaeota) is found in Central and South America. Its upper side is normally tan during the day but can change to green during the night. Photographed in Panama.The New Granada cross-banded tree frog (Smilisca phaeota) is found in Central and South America. Its upper side is normally tan during the day but can change to green during the night. Photographed in Panama.The New Granada cross-banded tree frog (Smilisca phaeota) is found in Central and South America. Its upper side is normally tan during the day but can change to green during the night. Photographed in Panama.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The New Granada cross-banded tree frog (Smilisca phaeota) is

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American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) is native to eastern North America but has been introduced to many other areas, often with disastrous results. The bullfrog is a voracious feeder and will eat many native species when introduced to new locations. Photographed in Oregon, USA.American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) is native to eastern North America but has been introduced to many other areas, often with disastrous results. The bullfrog is a voracious feeder and will eat many native species when introduced to new locations. Photographed in Oregon, USA.American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) is native to eastern North America but has been introduced to many other areas, often with disastrous results. The bullfrog is a voracious feeder and will eat many native species when introduced to new locations. Photographed in Oregon, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) is native to eastern

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders of crustaceans in the class Branchiopoda. Photographed in a small vernal pool, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Fairy Shrimp of the Order Anostraca, which is one of four orders

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Western Mosquito Fish (Gambusia affinis) are used as a biocontrol agent to reduce mosquito populations. In some instances the fish are responsible for decimating native populations of other species such as native tree frogs. The fish are distributed free of charge in some counties in Southern California for homeowners to place in their artificial pools.Western Mosquito Fish (Gambusia affinis) are used as a biocontrol agent to reduce mosquito populations. In some instances the fish are responsible for decimating native populations of other species such as native tree frogs. The fish are distributed free of charge in some counties in Southern California for homeowners to place in their artificial pools.Western Mosquito Fish (Gambusia affinis) are used as a biocontrol agent to reduce mosquito populations. In some instances the fish are responsible for decimating native populations of other species such as native tree frogs. The fish are distributed free of charge in some counties in Southern California for homeowners to place in their artificial pools.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Western Mosquito Fish (Gambusia affinis) are used as a biocontrol

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Hatchery raised juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Santa Barbara County, California.Hatchery raised juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Santa Barbara County, California.Hatchery raised juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Santa Barbara County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Hatchery raised juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss),

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Pile Worm (Nereis vexillosa), males are irridescent blue-green, females are dull green. Its range is along the western Pacific coast from Alaska to San Diego, California.Pile Worm (Nereis vexillosa), males are irridescent blue-green, females are dull green. Its range is along the western Pacific coast from Alaska to San Diego, California.Pile Worm (Nereis vexillosa), males are irridescent blue-green, females are dull green. Its range is along the western Pacific coast from Alaska to San Diego, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Pile Worm (Nereis vexillosa), males are irridescent blue-green,

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The Northern Clingfish (Gobiesox maeandricus) is occasional but rarely observed from southern Alaska to central California, rare in southern California. Photographed in San Luis Obispo County, California.The Northern Clingfish (Gobiesox maeandricus) is occasional but rarely observed from southern Alaska to central California, rare in southern California. Photographed in San Luis Obispo County, California.The Northern Clingfish (Gobiesox maeandricus) is occasional but rarely observed from southern Alaska to central California, rare in southern California. Photographed in San Luis Obispo County, California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The Northern Clingfish (Gobiesox maeandricus) is occasional but

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The species Arrow Goby (Clevelandia ios) is the only member of its genus. It is native to marine and brackish waters of the Pacific coast of North America from British Columbia to Baja California.The species Arrow Goby (Clevelandia ios) is the only member of its genus. It is native to marine and brackish waters of the Pacific coast of North America from British Columbia to Baja California.The species Arrow Goby (Clevelandia ios) is the only member of its genus. It is native to marine and brackish waters of the Pacific coast of North America from British Columbia to Baja California.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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The species Arrow Goby (Clevelandia ios) is the only member of

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Juvenile Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Santa Barbara County, California, USAJuvenile Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Santa Barbara County, California, USAJuvenile Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Santa Barbara County, California, USA© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Juvenile Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Santa

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Signal Crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, Oregon, USA.Signal Crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, Oregon, USA.Signal Crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, Oregon, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Signal Crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, Oregon, USA.

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Plécoptère (Perlidae sp) sur fond noir, Lac Quinault, Péninsule Olympique, WashingtonPlécoptère (Perlidae sp) sur fond noir, Lac Quinault, Péninsule Olympique, WashingtonPlécoptère (Perlidae sp) sur fond noir, Lac Quinault, Péninsule Olympique, Washington© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Plécoptère (Perlidae sp) sur fond noir, Lac Quinault,

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Spiny Crawler Mayflies are a family of the order Ephemeroptera. They are distributed throughout North America as well as the UK. This individual was found in Shasta County, California, USA.Spiny Crawler Mayflies are a family of the order Ephemeroptera. They are distributed throughout North America as well as the UK. This individual was found in Shasta County, California, USA.Spiny Crawler Mayflies are a family of the order Ephemeroptera. They are distributed throughout North America as well as the UK. This individual was found in Shasta County, California, USA.© Stuart Wilson / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale

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Spiny Crawler Mayflies are a family of the order Ephemeroptera.

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