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Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, in front of diving mask. This squid lives in a symbiotic relationship with the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, which inhabits a special light organ in the squid's mantle. The bacteria are fed a sugar and amino acid solution by the squid and in return hide the squid's silhouette when viewed from below by matching the amount of light hitting the top of the mantle, (counter-illumination). From Midway IslandHawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, in front of diving mask. This squid lives in a symbiotic relationship with the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, which inhabits a special light organ in the squid's mantle. The bacteria are fed a sugar and amino acid solution by the squid and in return hide the squid's silhouette when viewed from below by matching the amount of light hitting the top of the mantle, (counter-illumination). From Midway IslandHawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, in front of diving mask. This squid lives in a symbiotic relationship with the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, which inhabits a special light organ in the squid's mantle. The bacteria are fed a sugar and amino acid solution by the squid and in return hide the squid's silhouette when viewed from below by matching the amount of light hitting the top of the mantle, (counter-illumination). From Midway Island© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2430396

Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, in front of diving

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Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. PortugalRough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2424491

Rough pomfret, Taractes asper. Composite image. Portugal

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the Alfeite Marines Squadron. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420136

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog) working at the

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of sheep. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420135

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog). Watching a flock of

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420134

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), working on the

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Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. PortugalSerra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman. Is a large breed of dog, which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela Dog. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420133

Serra da Estrela dog (Estrela Mountain dog), along with herdsman.

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Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. PortugalMaritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic bags. Resin is usually collected by causing minor damage to the tree by making a hole far enough into the trunk to puncture the vacuoles, to let sap exit the tree, known as tapping, and then letting the tree repair its damage by filling the wound with resin. This usually takes a few days. Then, excess resin is collected.Turpentine is the volatile oil distilled from pine resin, which itself is obtained by tapping trees of the genus Pinus. The solid material left behind after distillation is known as rosin. Both products are used in a wide variety of applications. Traditionally, turpentine has been employed as a solvent or cleaning agent for paints and varnishes and this is still often the case today, particularly in those countries where the pine trees are tapped. There are also some specialized uses, in the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Portugal accounts for the greater part of world trade in gum turpentine but volumes have decreased in recent years as a result of falling resin production.The pine resin is antimicrobial and works to protect the plant from disease. Those same components can help to fight bacteria and fungus on our bodies, as well. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420132

Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), resin extraction with plastic

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Estrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, PortugalEstrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, PortugalEstrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with thorns to defend him from eventual attacks by wolves. Is a large breed of dog which has been used for centuries in the Estrela Mountains of Portugal to guard herds and homesteads. The Estrela Mountain Dog is a formidable opponent for any predator. It is calm but fearless and will not hesitate to react to danger, making it an exceptional watchdog as well as an excellent guard dog. Is one of the oldest breeds in Portugal. Shepherds would have chosen to breed the dogs that had the characteristics necessary to survive in their mountain environment and to do their job: protect herds from wolf attacks. Serra da Estrela, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2420131

Estrela Mountain dog, working on the field, with iron collar with

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Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection EnglandAerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection EnglandAerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans. The basking shark has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection England© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409061

Aerial view of Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, and kayak. is

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Four-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, PortugalFour-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, PortugalFour-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish have only two eyes, but the eyes are specially adapted for their surface-dwelling lifestyle. The eyes are positioned on the top of the head, and the fish floats at the water surface with only the lower half of each eye underwater. The two halves are divided by a band of tissue and the eye has two pupils, connected by part of the iris. The upper half of the eye is adapted for vision in air, the lower half for vision in water. The lens of the eye also changes in thickness top to bottom to account for the difference in the refractive indices of air versus water. Four-eyed fish spend most of their time at the surface of the water. Their diet mostly consists of terrestrial insects which are readily available at the surface. Aquarium, Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409060

Four-eyed fish, Anableps anableps, eye detail. Four-eyed fish

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Rosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USARosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USARosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409059

Rosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea. It's a predatory air-breathing

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Rosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea eating a small snail. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USARosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea eating a small snail. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USARosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea eating a small snail. It's a predatory air-breathing land snail, a carnivorous terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk. Is a fast and voracious predator, hunting and eating other snails and slugs. Was introduced into Hawaii in 1955 as a biological control for the invasive African land snail, Achatina fulica. This snail is responsible for the extinction of an estimated eight native snail species in Hawaii. This has caused the snail to be added to the IUCN’s top 100 most invasive species. USA© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409058

Rosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea eating a small snail. It's a

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia. Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409057

Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite imageEyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon palpebratus. They have subocular bioluminescent organs which it likely uses to attract and find prey, confuse predators, and communicate with other fish. These organs are blinked on and off by the fish using a dark lid that slides up to cover them. Use of only a black lid is unique to Photoblepharon; the other members of its family either rotate the organ into a pouch or employ a pouch-and-shutter method. Indonesia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409056

Eyelight fish or one-fin flashlightfish, Photoblepharon

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Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite imageSplitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops katoptron. They have two bean shaped torch-like organs under its eyes containing bioluminescent bacteria, which the fish can turn on and off by blinking. The light organs are embedded in suborbital cavities and are connected at the anterior edge via a cartilaginous rod like attachment. The suborbital light organs are densely settled with luminous symbiotic bacteria that grow in tubular structures and produce a constant bluish light. The flashlight fish blinks up to 90 blinks per minute, but when the flashlight fish detects its living planktonic prey, their light organs open for a longer period of time and blink five times less frequently. Philippines - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409055

Splitfin flashlightfish or two-fin flashlightfish, Anomalops

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White crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South PortugalWhite crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South PortugalWhite crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the sand dunes of Southwest Portugal. It's a white-berried perennial adapted to sandy soils in the Iberian Peninsula which has been consumed by humans for many centuries. It occurs naturally on sand dunes and cliffs of the Atlantic coast from Gibraltar to Finisterre, and in the Azores on volcanic lava and ash fields. C. album subsp. azoricum exists on six of the nine islands of the Azores, and below 200 m. Recently the range has extended to the dunes of Spanish Province of Alicante, and into France. The fruit has been consumer fresh for many centuries and they are sold fresh in a few public markets in Galicia. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine to reduce fevers and to kill intestinal worms Berries contain many anti-oxidants which have been reported as low amounts of anthocyanins, and high amounts of flavinol, and chloragenic acid derivatives, and phenolic acid. In a yeast Parkinson’s Disease model, C. album anti-oxidants may have protective effects, other than radical scavenging, and had a more powerful protective effect than Ginko biloba. South Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2409054

White crowberry, Corema album. Hand showing white berries, on the

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Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408023

Fluorescent coral. Acan Brain Coral, Acanthastrea sp.. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408022

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Above photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408021

Fluorescent coral. Mushroom coral, Rhodactis sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408020

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals and anemones are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408019

Fluorescent Zoanthus sp.. Left photographed with daylight and

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Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408018

Fluorescent soft coral. Button Polyp, Protopalythoa sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408017

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408016

Fluorescent coral. Pulse coral, Xenia sp.. Above photographed

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Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408015

Fluorescent anemone. Mushroom Anemone, Actinodiscus sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia paraglabrescens. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408014

Fluorescent coral. Large-polyped Stony coral, Euphyllia

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Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408013

Fluorescent coral. Bubble coral, Plerogyra sinuosa. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408012

Fluorescent coral. Brain coral, Trachyphyllia sp.. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408011

Fluorescent coral. Candy Cane Coral, Caulastrea furcata. Above

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Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalSouthern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with daylight and right showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many animals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408010

Southern giant clam, Tridacna derasa. Left photographed with

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Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408009

Fluorescent coral. Stony Coral, Euphyllia paradivisa. Above

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Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalMediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many anemones and corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408008

Mediterranean snakelocks sea anemone, Anemonia sulcata. Above

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Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. PortugalFluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Many corals are intensely fluorescent under certain light wavelengths. Shallow water reef-building fluorescent corals seem to be more resistant to coral bleaching than other corals, and the higher the density of fluorescent pigments, the more likely to resist. This enables them to better protect the zooxanthellae that help sustain them. The pigments that fluoresce are photoproteins, and a current theory is that this acts as a type of sunscreen that prevents too much UV light damaging the zooxanthallae. These corals have the photoproteins above the zooxanthallae to protect them. Corals that grow in deeper water, where light is scarce, are using fluorescence to absorb UV light and reflect it back to the zooxanthallae to give them more light to turn into nutrients. These corals have the photoproteins below the zooxanthallae to reflect it back. Photographed in aquarium. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408007

Fluorescent coral. Bushy Gorgonian, Rumphella sp.. Above

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Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalBell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408006

Bell Heather, Erica cinerea, flowers. Above photographed with

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Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalCommon golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408005

Common golden thistle, Scolymus hispanicus, flower. Above

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Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalYellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408004

Yellow flowers. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. PortugalDandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under ultraviolet light with a Baader-U Filter. This filter enables imaging in the deep UV spectral region. Some flowers have patterns that are only visible under ultraviolet light. Those surprising patterns can only be seen by the insects. While pollinating insects can see these patterns perfectly to find the nectar and pollen, the human eye cannot without some help of special photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408003

Dandelion flower. Above photographed with daylight and bellow

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Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death wood, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolet light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408002

Fluorescent fungus. Steccherinum sp., Hydnoid fungus on death

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Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). PortugalFluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion, photographed with visible light (above) and under ultraviolete light (bellow). Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408001

Fluorescent scorpion. Buthus occitanus, European scorpion,

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Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, hidden in the middle of the floating vegetation. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, AustraliaPlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, hidden in the middle of the floating vegetation. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, AustraliaPlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, hidden in the middle of the floating vegetation. It's a semiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The male's spurs deliver venom for defense. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2408000

Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus,

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Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite imagePlatypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, eating a Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. They also eat worms, insect larvae, freshwater shrimps that it digs out of the riverbed with its snout or catches while swimming. It uses cheek-pouches to carry prey to the surface, where it is eaten. The platypus needs to eat about 20% of its own weight each day, which requires it to spend an average of 12 hours daily looking for food. They have a sense of electroreception locating their prey in part by detecting electric fields generated by muscular contractions. Queensland, Australia - Composite image© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407999

Platypus or Duck-billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus,

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European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. PortugalEuropean lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. The fluorescent protein is in the same class as those found in corals and jellyfish. The mitochondrial genome of Branchiostoma lanceolatum has been sequenced, and the species serves as a model organism for studying the development of vertebrates. Aquarium photography. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407998

European lancelet, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Showing fluorescent

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Its muscle fibres produce the first fluorescent protein identified in a vertebrate. It's totally different” from other fluorescent proteins. For example, instead of producing light with a chromophore that is part of the protein sequence, as the classical Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) does, UnaG fluoresces when it binds a naturally occurring small molecule called bilirubin, a breakdown product of haemoglobin used in hospital tests for decades to assess liver function and diagnose diseases such as jaundice. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407997

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Showing fluorescent colours when

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Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photographyJapanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels live in fresh water and estuaries where they feed and grow as yellow eels for a number of years before they begin to mature and become silver eels that migrate to the sea spawn. The spawning area of this species is in the North Equatorial Current in the western North Pacific to the west of the Mariana Islands. The Japanese freshwater eel produces a fluorescent protein. This protein is the basis of a new test to assess dangerous blood toxins that can trigger liver disease. The Japanese eel is an important food fish in East Asia, where it is raised in aquaculture ponds in most countries in the region. In Japan, where they are called unagi, they are an important part of the food culture, with many restaurants serving grilled eel, which is called kabayaki. Eels also have uses in Chinese medicine. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407996

Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. The Japanese eel and other eels

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407995

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Showing

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. Lives in Northwest Atlantic and Caribbean Sea from 30 to 800 metres deep. They spend the day resting on the bottom where their characteristic coloration gives them a good camouflage against bottom rubble. During the night and when fed they are very active. Its small size makes it a popular cold-water public aquariums where is displayed and bred. Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407994

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above photographed with daylight bellown showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407993

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer. Above

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Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photographyChain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in sand bottom. Above photographed with daylight bellow showing fluorescent colours when photographed under special blue or ultraviolet light and filter. Scyliorhinus retifer. Is one of four elasmobranch species shown to possess biofluorescent properties. They exhibit bright green fluorescence patterns resulting from the presence of fluorescent compounds in their skin. Catsharks possess the ability to detect the green biofluorescence that is emitted by their conspecifics and this fluorescence creates greater contrast with the surrounding habitat in deeper blue-shifted waters (under solar or lunar illumination). Aquarium photography© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2407992

Chain catshark or chain dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer, resting in

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Light refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. PortugalLight refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. PortugalLight refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light refraction through window glass. Portugal© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405319

Light refraction on the wall. Spectrum of colours. Light

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Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of plastic inside and among cuisine salt crystals photographed with 5x enlargement. Polyester microfibres. The presence of microplastics in the seawater has been revealed as hazardous. Three possible toxic effects of plastic particle have been indicated: first due to the plastic particles themselves, second to the release of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) adsorbed to the plastics and third to the leaching of additives of the plastics. We are eating plastic particles every day indirectly by ingesting contaminated marine animals and directly through the cooking salt with which we season the food. Saline salt collected from the west coast of Portugal.© Paulo de Oliveira / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2405318

Microplastics on table salt. Tiny fragments and filaments of

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