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The Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126414

The Honey Ants Dream. An Aborigine child shows us a honeypot ant.

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The Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the mountain chain in the center of Australia. The highest altitude of this 350 million year old mountain range is 1,531 meters. The range, situated in the center of the central desert, stretches from east to west. The plains and plateaus that surround it are the preferred habitats for the acacia aneura, called mulga, which reaches a height of 15 meters. This tree grows abundantly in the arid zones in the center of Australia. It can survive with only 50mm of rain per year. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126413

The Honey Ants Dream. Night falls over the MacDonnel Ranges, the

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child regurgitates a drop of honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126412

The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and with their antenna scratch the neck of the replete. At the end of the cleaning, the repletes open their mandibles to provide access to a sort of stopper inside their mouths and a drop of nectar comes out to feed the worker ant. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126411

The Honey Ants Dream. The worker ants clean the honeypots and

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The Honey Ants Dream. Since the time of the first contact, in the fifties or sixties around Alice Springs, the Aborigines' diet has undergone a complete change. Within one generation they went from a 70% plant-based diet, with just some lean meats and practically no sugar, to a 90% industrial diet rich in sugar and fat. Diabetes, high cholesterol, kidney and liver cancer affect a great number of the Aborigines in the northern territories. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Since the time of the first contact, in the fifties or sixties around Alice Springs, the Aborigines' diet has undergone a complete change. Within one generation they went from a 70% plant-based diet, with just some lean meats and practically no sugar, to a 90% industrial diet rich in sugar and fat. Diabetes, high cholesterol, kidney and liver cancer affect a great number of the Aborigines in the northern territories. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Since the time of the first contact, in the fifties or sixties around Alice Springs, the Aborigines' diet has undergone a complete change. Within one generation they went from a 70% plant-based diet, with just some lean meats and practically no sugar, to a 90% industrial diet rich in sugar and fat. Diabetes, high cholesterol, kidney and liver cancer affect a great number of the Aborigines in the northern territories. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126410

The Honey Ants Dream. Since the time of the first contact, in the

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The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, as we were harvesting the honey ants' nest, threw her burrowing stick at a lizard. The scene played out in a few seconds despite the outside temperature of 40°. This 59-year-old Aborigine woman threw the stick and began digging up a rabbit hole where the reptile went to hide, triumphantly dragging the lizard out and finishing it off. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, as we were harvesting the honey ants' nest, threw her burrowing stick at a lizard. The scene played out in a few seconds despite the outside temperature of 40°. This 59-year-old Aborigine woman threw the stick and began digging up a rabbit hole where the reptile went to hide, triumphantly dragging the lizard out and finishing it off. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, as we were harvesting the honey ants' nest, threw her burrowing stick at a lizard. The scene played out in a few seconds despite the outside temperature of 40°. This 59-year-old Aborigine woman threw the stick and began digging up a rabbit hole where the reptile went to hide, triumphantly dragging the lizard out and finishing it off. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126409

The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, as we were harvesting the

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The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126408

The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The

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The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126407

The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the

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The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman digging with a burrowing stick, these days made of metal. Once made of acacia aneura wood, this stick was also used as much to dig up honey ants and tubers as to throw at prey such as lizards and other small animals. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126406

The Honey Ants Dream. Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in this harvest on the plains full of mulga trees. The Aborigines locate the honey ants at the foot of the tree by the size and the yellow grooves of the worker ants but also through the discoloration of the ground due to the formic acid with which the ants impregnate their nests and surroundings. The ground thus saturated turns a more orange color. Once the women have found the nest's entrance they dig vertically, following the main tunnel. The honey ants are very placid even if they do have powerful mandibles. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126405

The Honey Ants Dream. The women and the children participate in

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The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126404

The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of

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The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of their cave with their legs as their sister workers tend to them. The workers bring food from above ground and use their small mouths and mandibles to clean the distended bodies of the honeypots. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126403

The Honey Ants Dream. Honeypot ants hold onto the ceiling of

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The Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained insects often seems to embody characteristics we wish were more apparent in ourselves, such as a selflessness on behalf of the community and the ability to plan ahead in order to replace scarcity with plenty. Of course when times are really hard ants have also been known to eat their offspring – but then no society is perfect. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126402

The Honey Ants Dream. The behaviour of these small-brained

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126401

The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange through trophallaxis with a honeypot ant. The honey ants are omnivorous ants. The storing of honeydew is indispensable for the colony's survival and its consumption represents 40% of the colony's nourishment. The honeypot ants, “repletes”, are attentively cared for by the worker ants who clean and inspect them. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126400

The Honey Ants Dream. A honey ant during a buccal exchange

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The Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de miel et à l’aide de leurs antennes grattent le cou de la fourmi réservoir. À la fin du nettoyage, les fourmis réservoirs ouvrent leurs mandibules et donnent l’accès à un bouchon à l’intérieur de leur bouche et une goutte de nectar sort de leur bouche pour nourrir les travailleuses. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126399

The Honey Ants Dream. Les travailleuses, nettoient les pots de

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The Honey Ants Dream. Portrait of Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman. Her mother's generation was the first to have contact with civilization and she still possesses the knowledge of the elders. Traditions are rapidly being lost and acculturation has been accelerating since contact with civilization. Learning about life in the desert had been gradual and depended on the youths' age. The secrets and the know-how were handed down as the person matured. The traditions linked to the boomerang were lost within one generation. Learning about and making the boomerang began when the youths were physically and spiritually ready. The elders have not been able to carry on this tradition. TV, video games, internet intensify acculturation. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Portrait of Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman. Her mother's generation was the first to have contact with civilization and she still possesses the knowledge of the elders. Traditions are rapidly being lost and acculturation has been accelerating since contact with civilization. Learning about life in the desert had been gradual and depended on the youths' age. The secrets and the know-how were handed down as the person matured. The traditions linked to the boomerang were lost within one generation. Learning about and making the boomerang began when the youths were physically and spiritually ready. The elders have not been able to carry on this tradition. TV, video games, internet intensify acculturation. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Portrait of Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old Aborigine woman. Her mother's generation was the first to have contact with civilization and she still possesses the knowledge of the elders. Traditions are rapidly being lost and acculturation has been accelerating since contact with civilization. Learning about life in the desert had been gradual and depended on the youths' age. The secrets and the know-how were handed down as the person matured. The traditions linked to the boomerang were lost within one generation. Learning about and making the boomerang began when the youths were physically and spiritually ready. The elders have not been able to carry on this tradition. TV, video games, internet intensify acculturation. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126398

The Honey Ants Dream. Portrait of Audrey Martin, a 59-year-old

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The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the hand of an Aborigine woman. The repletes' chambers are often situated more than a meter deep and the only way of finding them is to locate the Melophotus bogati ants' discreet entrances at the foot of the mulga trees and then dig, following the tunnel which goes down vertically to more than one meter below ground. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126397

The Honey Ants Dream. 14 Repletes, the “honey pots”, in the

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The Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice this harvest on the plains where the mulga tree grows. The Melophotus bogati ants live in symbiosis with this tree. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126396

The Honey Ants Dream. Aborigine women still sometimes practice

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The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine child. It is a delicacy, surprising in its sweetness and its delicate taste. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126395

The Honey Ants Dream. A honeypot ant in the mouth of an Aborigine

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The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The repletes cling to the vertical walls as well as the ceiling of the storage chamber with their front legs. They are visited by the worker ants who caress their antennas and head to receive a drop of the precious honeydew. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
Sale prohibited by some Agents

2126394

The Honey Ants Dream. In the honeypot ants' chambers. The

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The Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la chaîne de montagnes du centre de l’Australie. L’altitude maximum de cette montagne vieille de 350 millions d’années est de 1 531 mètres. Cette chaîne de montagnes située au centre du désert central s’étend d’est en Ouest. Les plaines et plateaux qui l’entourent sont le lieu de prédilection de l’acacia aneura dit mulga qui atteint 15 mètres de hauteur. Cet arbre est très présent dans les zones arides du centre de l’Australie. Il peut survivre avec seulement 50 mm de précipitation par an. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126393

The Honey Ants Dream. La nuit tombe sur les monts MacDonnel, la

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The Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange buccal par trophallaxie avec une reine vierge de la colonie. Les fourmis à miel font partie des fourmis omnivores. Le stockage du miellat est indispensable à la survie de la colonie et sa consommation représente 40 % de l’alimentation de la colonie. Les fourmis réservoirs sont l’objet de toutes les attentions de la part des ouvrières qui les nettoient et inspectent. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126392

The Honey Ants Dream. Une fourmi pot de miel lors d’un échange

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The Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, AustraliaThe Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally be found more than one meter deep. They are connected to one of the entrances to the colony by a vertical tunnel that is dug out by the worker ants in very hard earth. Northern Territory, Australia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126391

The Honey Ants Dream. The honeypot ants' chambers can generally

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The pygmy canopy honey. Honney hunters and the photographer Eric Tourneret. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honney hunters and the photographer Eric Tourneret. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honney hunters and the photographer Eric Tourneret. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126390

The pygmy canopy honey. Honney hunters and the photographer Eric

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The pygmy canopy honey. An indigenous village along a forest track. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. An indigenous village along a forest track. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. An indigenous village along a forest track. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126389

The pygmy canopy honey. An indigenous village along a forest

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The pygmy canopy honey. In Pokola, the forest city between the departments of the Sangha and the Likouala, the forest company CIB aids in the development of the native communities and employs the N’Benseles as trailblazers and a school for the young indigenes with a school calendar adapted to the forest activities has been in operation since several years. The school is quite far from the native village and this distance does not facilitate attendance. For the young indigenes who speak French, the survival of their people depends on the education of an elite who will represent and defend them. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In Pokola, the forest city between the departments of the Sangha and the Likouala, the forest company CIB aids in the development of the native communities and employs the N’Benseles as trailblazers and a school for the young indigenes with a school calendar adapted to the forest activities has been in operation since several years. The school is quite far from the native village and this distance does not facilitate attendance. For the young indigenes who speak French, the survival of their people depends on the education of an elite who will represent and defend them. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In Pokola, the forest city between the departments of the Sangha and the Likouala, the forest company CIB aids in the development of the native communities and employs the N’Benseles as trailblazers and a school for the young indigenes with a school calendar adapted to the forest activities has been in operation since several years. The school is quite far from the native village and this distance does not facilitate attendance. For the young indigenes who speak French, the survival of their people depends on the education of an elite who will represent and defend them. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126388

The pygmy canopy honey. In Pokola, the forest city between the

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The pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women come back from the stream after their bath. Lokouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126387

The pygmy canopy honey. On the forest track, a group of women

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The pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey, the “pendi” at the moment it is lowered. In general, during the big honey season, the families are in the forest and the women also participate in the harvests. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126386

The pygmy canopy honey. The women catch the basket full of honey,

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The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made out of a bundle of sticks stuffed into leaves to create a dense smoke. An exceptional harvest of several kilos of honey from the trunk of an oil palm. Today, the oil palms are planted around the villages by the Bantu farmers following slash-and-burn and we can also find them near the camps of pygmies who consume them and thus scatter the fruit and seeds in the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126385

The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter prepares the smoker made

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The pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a liana.Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126384

The pygmy canopy honey. The basket of honey is lowered with a

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The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the honey-hunters climb the lianas to harvest a bees nest that had been located in the night. The honey-hunters get up before dawn to inspect the traps but also to be able to locate in the silence the sound of the bees fanning. A branch is cut near the tree to mark their discovery. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126383

The pygmy canopy honey. In a Marantaceae forest, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126382

The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional

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The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional basket. The men make traps of wood and lianas to trap antelopes and boar. The meat is shared at the camp and the surplus sold. The pygmies also hunt with a gun for the Bantu salesmen. The hunt, with a permit, is open legally from May 1 to October 20. The natives are authorized to hunt all year for their needs with traditional means if they do not trade or sell the meat. Meat from the bush can be found in the markets year-round and throughout the country. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126381

The pygmy canopy honey. Meat from the bush in a traditional

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The pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a day. The honey-hunters devour the honey during the harvest as though to pay themselves for the effort expended. At the base of the tree, the honey is shared and the rest is brought back to the camp for the women and children. The brood cell is eaten by the men. It's man's food. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan and the big season for honey and larvae is in August and September. Then, everyone is in the forest and and no one is left in the village. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126380

The pygmy canopy honey. One, two, three trees are harvested in a

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is rudimentary. The mat is the only furniture. The fire is always kept lit to keep away insects. When they travel, the families always transport some embers to be able to quickly light a fire to smoke the bees, set up camp for the night or rapidly treat a snake bite by applying an ember to the wound. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126379

The pygmy canopy honey. In the Masseyle family's hut, comfort is

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The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to the camp in a leaf. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126378

The pygmy canopy honey. A “Bouy”, honeycomb, brought back to

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The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo” mushroom he gathered from amongst the buttress roots of the sacred tree of the ancestors. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126377

The pygmy canopy honey. A honey-hunter with the “Ndjingo”

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to prepare the smoker for the bees. In the heart of the forest, when a space is opened to the sun, thousands of gnats swarm to the men to enjoy the mineral salts from their perspiration, drawing from their skin some nourishment. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126376

The pygmy canopy honey. In the undergrowth, a fire is lit to

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The pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter who, with his basket for gathering the honey, climbs up a liana to reach the fork in a giant of the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126375

The pygmy canopy honey. A difficult climb for this honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126374

The pygmy canopy honey. Following the harvest, the joy of honey.

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The pygmy canopy honey. At the camp, the women build the structure of the hut within a few minutes. Then the hut is covered in Marantaceae leaves or some other leaves found in the immediate surroundings. At the camp, the ground is swept once a day, the fire in the huts keeps away gnats and insects and in the case of ants, red embers are scattered on the ground. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At the camp, the women build the structure of the hut within a few minutes. Then the hut is covered in Marantaceae leaves or some other leaves found in the immediate surroundings. At the camp, the ground is swept once a day, the fire in the huts keeps away gnats and insects and in the case of ants, red embers are scattered on the ground. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At the camp, the women build the structure of the hut within a few minutes. Then the hut is covered in Marantaceae leaves or some other leaves found in the immediate surroundings. At the camp, the ground is swept once a day, the fire in the huts keeps away gnats and insects and in the case of ants, red embers are scattered on the ground. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126373

The pygmy canopy honey. At the camp, the women build the

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The pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the Bantus amongst whom polygamy is widespread and the extended family plays an essential social role, the family unit is quite close knit amongst the pygmies. At the camp, the couples are very solid and solidary. Before marriage, the youths are very free. In the village, the confrontation with the Bantu destabilizes the family. Alcohol, money and cheating perturb the people of the forest. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126372

The pygmy canopy honey. Scene at the camp. As opposed to the

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The pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for basketry, for making the traditional baskets and mats that will be sold to the Bantus. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126371

The pygmy canopy honey. The stalks of Marantaceae are used for

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The pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather wild yams for the meals, some palm nuts and also Koko leaves, the leaves of a liana used to prepare a sauce. The Koko leaves are also traded or sold to the Bantu masters who sell them in the market of Pokola, the neighboring city. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126370

The pygmy canopy honey. The women go into the forest to gather

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the camp of Massila groups together 5 huts. The huts are covered in Marantaceae leaves. The opening of forest roads in the last twenty-five years has profoundly changed the N’Bensele's way of life. Their relation with the Bantu masters has been modified; clothing and distilled alcohol has arrived in the camps and the villages. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126369

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by “Libolis” trees, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the evening at the camp, the people talk to the children about the ancestors and their ways of the past. They speak of hunting elephants with assegais. The ancestors, the great elephant hunters, are called “Touma” and when a entered the forest, the people had hopes for an exceptional hunt. During the nocturnal ceremonies, the whole camp calls upon the largesse of the god “Comba”. The chants are hunting songs, of enthusiasm and thanks for the hunt or harvest to come. These ceremonies often take place after a good hunt, when the camp shares antelope or boar meat. Likiouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the evening at the camp, the people talk to the children about the ancestors and their ways of the past. They speak of hunting elephants with assegais. The ancestors, the great elephant hunters, are called “Touma” and when a entered the forest, the people had hopes for an exceptional hunt. During the nocturnal ceremonies, the whole camp calls upon the largesse of the god “Comba”. The chants are hunting songs, of enthusiasm and thanks for the hunt or harvest to come. These ceremonies often take place after a good hunt, when the camp shares antelope or boar meat. Likiouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the evening at the camp, the people talk to the children about the ancestors and their ways of the past. They speak of hunting elephants with assegais. The ancestors, the great elephant hunters, are called “Touma” and when a entered the forest, the people had hopes for an exceptional hunt. During the nocturnal ceremonies, the whole camp calls upon the largesse of the god “Comba”. The chants are hunting songs, of enthusiasm and thanks for the hunt or harvest to come. These ceremonies often take place after a good hunt, when the camp shares antelope or boar meat. Likiouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126368

The pygmy canopy honey. In the evening at the camp, the people

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The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled with the honey from the harvest. It is lowered from the tree using a rope made of lianas. Honey is important in the Likouala and for the N’Bensele clan who specializes in this activity. August and September are the big honey season in these rainforests with big marshy zones that favor the proliferation of flowers and bees' nests. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126367

The pygmy canopy honey. The honey basket, “pendi”, is filled

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The pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning honey harvest on a Marantaceae leaf. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that they make “Douma”, the honey wine, or mead, that was until only recently the only alcohol consumed by the pygmy people. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126366

The pygmy canopy honey. The honey-hunters have put the morning

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126365

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy night that has made the temperatures drop, the women of the camp sing in unison to warm themselves. A moment of sharing in which smiles and good humour win out over the cold and damp of the night. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126364

The pygmy canopy honey. In the early morning following a stormy

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The pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted the flight of bees towards a nest more than 50 metres high in an undergrowth of Mangobé plants. The big equatorial forest of Central Africa is the planets second lung. But in reality it is a very diversified ecosystem. Human presence in this forest goes back more than 20,000 years and during the last 5000 years there have been periods of drought linked to climatic changes. 2500 years ago, with the spreading of iron, and the arrival of the Bantu people, the forest cover was profoundly modified, the savannahs created. The Mangobe plants with an open undergrowth attest to ancient human occupation. These are often the spots where slash and burn has been practiced. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126363

The pygmy canopy honey. A team of honey-hunters have just spotted

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The pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has just been harvested and the honey-hunters sample their booty in the canopy. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126362

The pygmy canopy honey. A “coma”, nest of stingless bees, has

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The pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and Bantu peoples of the North-West of Congo-Brazzaville have been motivated by aesthetics, courage and prominence. Long perpetrated by the two ethnic groups, they tend to disappear among the Bantu. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126361

The pygmy canopy honey. The dental mutilation among pygmies and

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The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126360

The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the

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The pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres high, the honey-hunter perched on the trunk passes a branch with dexterity. The pygmies are excellent climbers, athletes of the forest who accomplish feats every day in harvesting the honey. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126359

The pygmy canopy honey. On an enormous mahogany tree 50 metres

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The pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of Likouala and the N’Bensele clan is known for their honey production. Sangha, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126358

The pygmy canopy honey. Honey is important in the department of

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The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter balancing on the tree trunk plunges his hand into the nest to harvest the honeycombs. In the N’Bensele clan, the best way to find a wife in the camp is to give her honey. A man has to know how to climb and not be afraid of stings. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126357

The pygmy canopy honey. Surrounded by bees, the honey-hunter

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The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, CongoThe pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the honey-hunters smoke the bees and gather the honey from the forest canopy. During the little honey season in April and May, the harvests are smaller than during the big season in August and September. Several nests are harvested each day. The period with an abundance of honey is called “Nbosso”, August September. Everybody is in the forest and there's no one left in the village. It's during this period that the “Douma”, the honey wine, is made. Likouala, Congo© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126356

The pygmy canopy honey. At over 40 metres above the ground, the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, MexicoKillers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, MexicoKillers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself on nectar and gathers pellets of pollen from a flower of the Datura arborea, Cuetzalam, Puebla, Mexico© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126355

Killers Africanized Honeybees. An Africanized bee gorges itself

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its impurities and stored in food-grade barrels. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126354

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The honey is then filtered of its

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the honey war. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126353

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Tasting the spoils following the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells full of honey is cut. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126352

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The wax that closes the wax cells

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that proves that the honey is ripe upon harvesting and, in the background, another man handles the cappings dryer. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126351

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The men cut the wax cap that

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126350

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A frame of honey. Panama

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker. After two hours of harvesting and despite his protection, his nerves are getting frayed. The venom stings the eyes and the nose and an acidic taste fills the mouth. Don't panic, don'y panic.... Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126349

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A young intern handles the smoker.

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers can finally put away the smokers and enjor a moment of rest before the next apiary. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126348

Killers Africanized Honeybees. On the road back, the beekeepers

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work, tries to limit the number of bees in front of his lens. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126347

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Eric Tourneret, hard at work,

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126346

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont l’habitude d’attaquer de façon préventive. Elles attaquent en plus grand nombre et suivent leur victime sur des centaines de mètres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126345

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Les abeilles africanisées ont

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126344

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make preventive attacks. They attack in the greatest number and follow their victim over hundreds of metres. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126343

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The Africanized bees usually make

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the hive. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126342

Killers Africanized Honeybees. A honey frame fresh out of the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the smoker and another who removes the frames of honey. The only solution for calming the killer bees' aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126341

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Teamwork: a beekeeper with the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda Batista is 50 years old; she has been working with bees for 14 years. In equatorial America, before the arrival of the Africanized bees, professional beekeepers had a stock of 1000 to 2000 ruches. Since they have been working with the Africanized bee, the beekeepers' average stock is 300 hives because managing the colony is difficult due to this hybrid bee's aggressiveness. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126340

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The team leader is a woman. Neyda

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few moments of peace. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126339

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Smoking of the camera for a few

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the photographer Eric Tourneret. The black of the camera make the bees even more aggressive and they thrust their stingers into all the camera's rubber parts. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126338

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Thousands of bees attack the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is always the beekeeper's first act. Here, it is vital. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126337

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Abundant smoking of the hives is

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant smoker from Brazil goes into action. The varroa mite, a parasite for bees, is better tolerated by the Africanized bees because they manage to delouse themselves and also because they regularly change their habitat, which limits growth of the varroa population. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126336

Killers Africanized Honeybees. Before opening the hive, the giant

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126335

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the back of the pick-up a beekeeper smokes the hives' honey-filled supers to prevent a pillage. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126334

Killers Africanized Honeybees. We leave the apiary but in the

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack has not faltered. Behind the masks, faces are drawn and the odor of the venom is everywhere. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126333

Killers Africanized Honeybees. For an hour now, the bees' attack

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret and his camera are unceasingly attacked. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126332

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The photographer Eric Tourneret

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does not really calm the enraged guard bees. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126331

Killers Africanized Honeybees. The smoke, although abundant, does

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Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. PanamaKillers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the 80-hive apiary, all the guard bees unite and together attack the intruders. Panama© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126330

Killers Africanized Honeybees. During the honey harvest at the

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The Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day has to be quick. The harvester climbs the tree, smokes abundantly with the smoker and within a few minutes cuts the end of the comb. Then he climbs back down and onto the boat that immediately sails away to avoid the many attacks and also let the bees return to their nest. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126329

The Honey Nights. The harvesting of a honey board during the day

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The Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman and beekeeper, brings the honey from his harvest to the association APDS. Eighteen tons of honey were produced in 2014 by the members of the APDS. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126328

The Honey Nights. On his 52-years-old pirogue, Suharjo, fisherman

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The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey harvester leaves a bit of honey on the comb, as well as the pollen and the brood. In the day, most of the bees chased away during the harvest return to their comb. If the flowers continue to blossom, they bring honey back to the comb again and the collectors will return a week later to again harvest the honey. This semi-domestication is an ingenious means of countering the natural instinct of the giant bees, which migrate over several hundred kilometers each year and easily change nests. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126327

The Honey Nights. The honey comb is cut cleanly. The honey

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The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased from their nest with the help of a smoker. The smoke keeps the guardian bees at bay and the leaves at the end of the smoke are used to sweep away the most recalcitrant. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126326

The Honey Nights. In the middle of the day, the bees are chased

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The Honey Nights. Portrait of Suriadi, 29 years old, member of the association APDS and owner of nearly three hundred honey boards. In 2014, the swarms of 123 tikungs produced 250 kilos of honey. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Portrait of Suriadi, 29 years old, member of the association APDS and owner of nearly three hundred honey boards. In 2014, the swarms of 123 tikungs produced 250 kilos of honey. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Portrait of Suriadi, 29 years old, member of the association APDS and owner of nearly three hundred honey boards. In 2014, the swarms of 123 tikungs produced 250 kilos of honey. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126325

The Honey Nights. Portrait of Suriadi, 29 years old, member of

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The Honey Nights. Suriadi, from the association APDS, leaves for the harvest. The beekeepers association of Danau Sentarum recommends the daily harvest to its members. To work faster and with less danger, it advises that three people participate: the boat's pilot, an assistant who retrieves the honey and the harvesters. Working in groups allows them to harvest even more nests, twenty or so in a few hours. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Suriadi, from the association APDS, leaves for the harvest. The beekeepers association of Danau Sentarum recommends the daily harvest to its members. To work faster and with less danger, it advises that three people participate: the boat's pilot, an assistant who retrieves the honey and the harvesters. Working in groups allows them to harvest even more nests, twenty or so in a few hours. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Suriadi, from the association APDS, leaves for the harvest. The beekeepers association of Danau Sentarum recommends the daily harvest to its members. To work faster and with less danger, it advises that three people participate: the boat's pilot, an assistant who retrieves the honey and the harvesters. Working in groups allows them to harvest even more nests, twenty or so in a few hours. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126324

The Honey Nights. Suriadi, from the association APDS, leaves for

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The Honey Nights. Day harvest by three people: the boat's driver, a helper who recovers the honey and harvests it. Group harvesting allows more nests to be harvested, some twenty in a few hours. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Day harvest by three people: the boat's driver, a helper who recovers the honey and harvests it. Group harvesting allows more nests to be harvested, some twenty in a few hours. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Day harvest by three people: the boat's driver, a helper who recovers the honey and harvests it. Group harvesting allows more nests to be harvested, some twenty in a few hours. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126323

The Honey Nights. Day harvest by three people: the boat's driver,

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The Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29 years old, takes care of production. He checks the honey's quality and also monitors the dehydrating process that lowers the honey's moisture content from 27% to 21%, an indispensable step that prevents rapid fermentation and thus allows for the marketing of the honey. APDS produced 18 tons of honey in 2014 in the territory covered by six villages. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126322

The Honey Nights. At the APDS association's premises, Suriadi, 29

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The Honey Nights. The making of honey boards or tikung in the village of Lubak Mawang. The boards are cut and then their lower surface is rubbed with wax to increase the chances of attracting the swarms. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The making of honey boards or tikung in the village of Lubak Mawang. The boards are cut and then their lower surface is rubbed with wax to increase the chances of attracting the swarms. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The making of honey boards or tikung in the village of Lubak Mawang. The boards are cut and then their lower surface is rubbed with wax to increase the chances of attracting the swarms. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126321

The Honey Nights. The making of honey boards or tikung in the

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The Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126320

The Honey Nights. Giant Honey bees (Apis dorsata) on their brood.

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The Honey Nights. Scenes of daily life in the fishing village of Lubak Mawang with its houses on piles. Life in the village revolves around fishing activities. The villagers get up early, fish and process their catch. Just before nightfall, they bathe themselves in the river. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Scenes of daily life in the fishing village of Lubak Mawang with its houses on piles. Life in the village revolves around fishing activities. The villagers get up early, fish and process their catch. Just before nightfall, they bathe themselves in the river. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Scenes of daily life in the fishing village of Lubak Mawang with its houses on piles. Life in the village revolves around fishing activities. The villagers get up early, fish and process their catch. Just before nightfall, they bathe themselves in the river. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126319

The Honey Nights. Scenes of daily life in the fishing village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126318

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of Lubak Mawang, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey to be sold. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126317

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, in the village of

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The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak Hamsah's family prepare the honey. They cut the combs and filter the nectar. For the start of this season, the harvest was meager: only 18kg were extracted the previous evening. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126316

The Honey Nights. The day after the harvest, the men from Pak

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The Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, IndonesiaThe Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who does not fear a few stings. The swarms are harvested at night to avoid the fury of the giant bees, which are disoriented by the darkness. Borneo, Indonesia© Eric Tourneret / BiosphotoJPG - RMNon exclusive sale
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2126315

The Honey Nights. Boni, Hamsah's brother, is a daring climber who

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